Jones v. North Carolina Prisoners' Labor Union

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Jones v. North Carolina Prisoners' Labor Union
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued April 19, 1977
Decided June 23, 1977
Full case name Jones, Secretary, Department of Correction of North Carolina, et al. v. North Carolina Prisoners' Labor Union, Inc.
Citations 433 U.S. 119 (more)
97 S. Ct. 2532; 53 L. Ed. 2d 629; 1977 U.S. LEXIS 136; 81 Lab. Cas. (CCH) ¶ 13,281
Prior history Appeal from the United States District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina
Holding
Prison inmates do not have a right under the First Amendment to join labor unions.
Court membership
Chief Justice
Warren E. Burger
Associate Justices
William J. Brennan, Jr. · Potter Stewart
Byron White · Thurgood Marshall
Harry Blackmun · Lewis F. Powell, Jr.
William Rehnquist · John P. Stevens
Case opinions
Majority Rehnquist, joined by Burger, Stewart, White, Blackmun, Powell
Concurrence Burger
Concur/dissent Stevens
Dissent Marshall, joined by Brennan

Jones v. North Carolina Prisoners' Labor Union, 433 U.S. 119 (1977), was a United States Supreme Court case whose ruling stated that prison inmates do not have a right under the First Amendment to join labor unions.[1][2]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "JONES v. NORTH CAROLINA PRISONERS' UNION, 433 U.S. 119 (1977)". U.S. Supreme Court. FindLaw. June 23, 1977. Retrieved 3 February 2010. 
  2. ^ Tibbs, Donald F. BLACK POWER, PRISON POWER: Race, Radicalism, and Rights in Jones v. North Carolina Prisoners' Labor Union. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press.