Joon Yun

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Joon Yun
Born Anthony Joonkyoo Yun
Seoul, South Korea
Nationality United States
Alma mater Stanford University School of Medicine
Duke University School of Medicine
Harvard College
Occupation Physician
President of Palo Alto Investors[1]
Founder of Palo Alto Institute
Known for Palo Alto Longevity Prize
Website drjoonyun.com

Anthony Joonkyoo "Joon" Yun (born 1967) is a Korean-American physician, hedge-fund manager and investor.[2]

Early life, education and early career[edit]

Yun was born in Seoul, South Korea. He attended St. Albans School, a private all-boys school in Washington, D.C. He went on to study at Harvard College where he obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree in biology in 1990. He obtained his Doctor of Medicine degree from Duke University School of Medicine in 1994 and completed a fellowship and residency in radiology from Stanford Hospital in 2000. After his residency, he served on the clinical faculty at the same institution from 2000 until 2006.[3]

Career[edit]

Yun began his career as a healthcare analyst in 1998 at Palo Alto Investors, LLC, a hedge fund based in Palo Alto, California, with $1 billion assets under management invested in healthcare.[4] Palo Alto Investors was founded in 1989 by William Edwards,[5] the son of venture capitalist Bill Edwards, one of the original Silicon Valley venture capitalists. Yun has been responsible for healthcare investments for Palo Alto Investors since 1998 and in 2008 was elected president of the firm.[6]

Yun has served on several corporate and non-profit boards, including SV2.[7][8] He is a contributor to Forbes,[3][9] and a speaker and commentator on Bloomberg,[10] the SALT conference, George SorosInstitute for New Economic Thinking,[11] and numerous other media outlets and conferences.

Palo Alto Prize[edit]

Yun is also the creator and sponsor of the $1 Million Palo Alto Longevity Prize,[12] which was launched in 2014,[13] an incentive prize to encourage teams from all over the world to compete in an all-out effort to "hack the code" that regulates our health and lifespan.[14][15][16][17][18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "$1 million Palo Alto Prize seeks to 'cure' aging". Palo Alto Online. September 10, 2014. Retrieved February 19, 2015.
  2. ^ Kristen Sze (September 8, 2014). "$1 million prize offered to hack the code of aging". ABC7 News. Retrieved September 14, 2014.
  3. ^ a b "Joon Yun, M.D." Forbes. Retrieved September 8, 2014.
  4. ^ "Joon Yun at Bloomberg". Bloomberg. Retrieved September 8, 2014.
  5. ^ "William Leland Edwards Bio, Returns, Net Worth". Insider Monkey. Retrieved September 8, 2014.
  6. ^ "Palo Alto Investors Names Dr. Anthony J. Yun as President" (Press release). PR Newswire. June 9, 2014. Retrieved September 8, 2014.
  7. ^ "Leadership". ConsumerMed. Retrieved September 8, 2014.
  8. ^ "Board of Directors – Allergen Research Corporation". Allergen Research Corporation. Retrieved September 8, 2014.
  9. ^ "Introducing Joon Yun to Evolution: This View of Life". Evolution Institute. February 7, 2012. Retrieved September 8, 2014.
  10. ^ "Health Care Is an Enabler of GDP Growth: Yun". Bloomberg. November 12, 2012. Retrieved September 8, 2014.
  11. ^ "Joon Yun: Healthcare in the 21st Century". Institute for New Economic Thinking. Retrieved November 29, 2015.
  12. ^ Zoë Corbyn (January 13, 2015). "Live for ever: Scientists say they'll soon extend life 'well beyond 120'". The Guardian. Retrieved January 13, 2015.
  13. ^ Josie Ensor (February 14, 2015). "How Silicon Valley is trying to cure ageing". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved February 19, 2015.
  14. ^ Ashlee Vance (September 9, 2014). "Silicon Valley Investor Backs $1 Million Prize to End Death". Bloomberg Businessweek. Retrieved September 14, 2014.
  15. ^ Aaron Kinney (September 14, 2014). "Silicon Valley launches another bid to 'hack' aging, cheat death". Mercury News. Retrieved September 18, 2014.
  16. ^ Sarah Buhr (September 15, 2014). "The $1 Million Race For The Cure To End Aging". TechCrunch. Retrieved September 18, 2014.
  17. ^ Victoria Thorp (November 23, 2014). "The Palo Alto Prize: A 'Moonshot' at Increasing Longevity". Palo Alto Pulse. Retrieved December 8, 2014.
  18. ^ "After the last death: Doctors, academics debate the possibility, value of a 150-year lifespan". Palo Alto Online. January 9, 2015. Retrieved January 13, 2015.

External links[edit]