Jordan Burroughs

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Jordan Burroughs
Jordan Burroughs at 2017 Men's freestyle Wrestling World Cup, Kermanshah.jpg
Personal information
NationalityAmerican
Born (1988-07-08) July 8, 1988 (age 32)
Camden, New Jersey, U.S.
Height5 ft 8 in (173 cm)
Weight74 kg (163 lb)
Sport
CountryUnited States
SportWrestling
Event(s)Freestyle
College teamNebraska
ClubSunkist Kids
TeamUSA
Turned pro2011
Coached byMark Manning

Jordan Ernest Burroughs (born July 8, 1988) is an American freestyle wrestler and graduated folkstyle wrestler. In freestyle, he is an Olympic Gold medalist, four-time World Champion, six-time World Cup champion, three-time Pan American Games Gold medalist and four-time Pan American champion. In folkstyle, Burroughs was a two-time NCAA Division I champion and was awarded the Dan Hodge Trophy (equivalent to the Heisman Trophy) in 2012.

Burroughs is widely known by his double leg takedown[1][2] and is considered one of the greatest American wrestlers of all time.[3][4][5]

Early life[edit]

Burroughs is from the Sicklerville section of Winslow Township, New Jersey.[6] When he was in elementary school, he brought a wrestling flyer home and became the first member of his family to ever wrestle, at the age of five.[7] He went on to attend Winslow Township High School, where he was a three-sport athlete, wrestling, playing American football and running. He dreamed of playing in the NFL as a wide receiver, but gave up on it to focus on wrestling, weighing 130 pounds as a freshman.[8]

As a wrestler, he became a three-time district champion, two-time regional champion, state (NJSIAA) champion and NHSCA National champion in his senior year (06').[9][10] He graduated with 115 wins and 20 losses.[11]

College career[edit]

In 2006, he accepted a scholarship to the University of Nebraska as the 52nd ranked senior in the nation.[12]

2006–07[edit]

Burroughs' freshman year ended with 16 wins and 13 losses.[13] He was also an NCAA qualifier[14] and placed third at the Big 12 Conference championships.[15]

2007–08[edit]

For his sophomore year in college, he made adjustments with which he finished regular season with a 34–6 record. He also set a single-season record, scoring 98 dual takedowns and surrendering just seven on the year, marking one of UNL's best sophomore seasons.[13] As the top-seed at the Big 12 Championships, Burroughs made his way to the title with technical fall and major decisions and was also named the Outstanding Wrestler of the tournament.[16] At the NCAAs, he capped three victories up until the semifinals, where he was downed by Hawkeyes' legend Brent Metcalf.[17] He placed third after defeating J.P. O'Connor and Josh Churella in his last matches of the season, claiming All-American honors.[18]

2008–09[edit]

During his junior year, he won the Cliff Keen title (with wins over returning AA O'Connor and defending NCAA champion Jordan Leen), where he was named the Outstanding Wrestler.[19] He also broke the school's single-season dual takedown record for the second straight year with 117 in 19 duals, only giving up one himself, to future three-time Bellator MMA World Champion Michael Chandler.[13] Burroughs then claimed his second Big 12 title with wins over Oklahoma State's Neil Erisman and once again over Chandler.[20] Entering as an undefeated (34–0) top-seed, he claimed his first NCAA title by beating fellow undefeated (17–0) second-seed Mike Poeta in the finals.[21] He also defeated future UFC fighter Gregor Gillespie in the semifinals.[22]

2009–10[edit]

Burroughs was having a 7–0 regular season, including a single win at the Las Vegas Invitational against eventual UFC Interim Champion Justin Gaethje (he was forced to forfeit the next matches due to an injury suffered in the match),[23] before suffering a season-ending injury at a dual match against Central Michigan's Steve Brown, where he dropped an overtime loss due to the injury.[24] This led to a medical redshirt for the remainder of the year.

2010–11[edit]

Burroughs started his comeback senior season strong with a Harold Nichols Classic and Midlands Championships with a win over returning NCAA champion Andrew Howe in the finals, receiving the Dan Gable Most Outstanding Wrestler award due to his performance in the tournament.[25] He capped off a perfect 29–0 to finish regular season.[13] At the Big 12's, he defeated second-ranked in the country Tyler Caldwell 2–1 to claim the championship.[26] At the NCAA's, he once again defeated Caldwell in the finals to become a two-time National Champion.[4] Post season, he was awarded the Dan Hodge Trophy as the best collegiate wrestler in the country after capping off an undefeated season.[27] He graduated with 128 wins and 20 losses, 13 of those coming in his first year.[28]

Freestyle career[edit]

Age-group[edit]

As a junior-level wrestler, Burroughs was a FILA US National Champion and World Team Trials champion in 2008, going on to place tenth at the World Championships.[29]

Senior level[edit]

2007[edit]

Burroughs made his senior level debut at the US University Nationals on April, where he placed second to Teyon Ware.[30]

2011[edit]

Just three weeks after graduating from college, Burroughs made an immediate jump into the freestyle scene, competing at the US Open on April 7–10. He dismantled all of his four opponents (which included Nick Marable and Bobby Nash) to claim the championship.[31]

On May 5, he defeated Aniuar Geduev from Russia, at the annual Beat The Streets dual.[32] At the US World Team Trials of June 9–11, Burroughs went on to defeat US University National Champion Andrew Howe twice in a row to become the US World Team Member at 74 kilograms.[4] He then went on to win the Ukrainian Memorial International tournament on July 23–24, winning every period of the five matches he competed in and coming out with a notable victory over Musa Murtazaliev.[33]

At the World Championships on September 18, Burroughs was able to make a 5–0 mark in the stacked weight class, defeating the likes of two-time and defending World Champion Denis Tsargush, Central American and Caribbean Games champion Ricardo Roberty, Military World medalist Ashraf Aliyev and Sadegh Goudarzi, 10' World Silver medalist and Asian Games champion.[34] By this result, Burroughs became the third Cornhusker to win a World Title for the United States of America.[35]

To close the year, the recently crowned World Champion won his first Pan American Games title on October 24, after running through all of his three opponents.[36]

2012[edit]

Burroughs started off his legendary year by winning the Dave Schultz Memorial International on February 1–4, where he defeated the likes of Tyler Caldwell and Trent Paulson.[37] He travelled to Cuba for the Cerro Pelado International on February 14–15, where he once again claimed the gold medal, now with victories over Nick Marable and Paulson.[38][39] On April 21, he claimed the US Olympic spot at 74 kilograms after downing Andrew Howe once, as he was forced to forfeit the next match.[40]

Burroughs was selected to represent the United States at the World Cup on May 12–13. He collected notable wins for his resume after beating the likes of Akhmed Gadzhimagomedov, Sosuke Takatani, Sadegh Goudarzi and Davit Khutsishvili, to claim gold.[41] He also dominated Russia's Kamel Malikov at the annual Beat the Streets.[42]

At the 2012 Summer Olympics of London on August 10, Burroughs opened up with a dominant 4–0, 6–0 performance over Francisco Soler from Puerto Rico and followed up with a 2–1, 1–1 score over Matt Gentry from Canada, to advance to the semifinals. At the semifinals, he took out two-time World Champion and three-time European Champion Denis Tsargush from Russia, in a rough 3–1, 0–2, 2–1 to advance to the finale, where he was able to not get scored on by the highly accomplished Sadegh Goudarzi and end the match 1–0, 1–0 to claim his Olympic Championship.[43][44][45]

2013[edit]

Burroughs won his second World Cup on February 21–22, defeating the likes of Sosuke Takatani, Ezzatollah Akbari and Ali Shabanau.[46][47] On March 1–2, he also won the Alexander Medved Prizes International title.[48]

On April 17–19, he came back to the national circuit to claim his second US Open title, taking out Penn State legend David Taylor in the process.[49] He then defeated Saba Khubezhty in two different duals, the first one at the Rumble on the Rails and the second one at Beat the Streets, on May 15 and 19 respectively.[50][51]

Burroughs made his second US World Team on June 21–23, when he grounded recent graduate and four-time NCAA champion Kyle Dake twice, remaining un-scored (7–0) in the first match and going to overtime (8–6) in the second.[52] He then warmed up with a Stepan Sargsyan International title on August 3–4, compiling four more victories to his streak.[53]

Four weeks prior to the World Championships, Burroughs broke his ankle,[54] however, he was once again victorious at the tournament, now in even more dominant fashion. He outscored his opposition 34–3, and recorded technical falls in three of his five matches (including Narsingh Yadav and Jabrayil Hasanov), the two remaining being a disqualification win against Ali Shabanau and a 4–0 match in the finale against Ezzatollah Akbari, to crown himself as a two-time World Champion.[55][56]

In 2014, Burroughs received the 2013 John Smith Award as USA Wrestling's Freestyle Wrestler of the Year.[57]

2014[edit]

Burroughs travelled to Turkey to compete at the Yasar Dogu on February 15–16, where he won over Rashid Kurbanov (6–0) and Pürevjavyn Önörbat (TF 10–0) before his legendary 70-match win streak and undefeated 70–0 record since crossing over to freestyle full-time were broken by Nick Marable, in a criteria 4–4 loss.[58][59] He went on to claim the bronze medal.[60]

Despite his streak being snapped, Burroughs continued to dominate his opposition, now while representing the United States at the World Cup on March 15–16, where he got two falls (one over Parveen Rana), two tech falls and one 7–1 decision over Ezzatollah Akbari, helping the USA reach third-place and claiming his second individual World Cup.[61] He also claimed his third US Open title on April 15–19, after defeating two-time Dan Hodge Trophy winner David Taylor in an exciting finale.[62] Before the US WTT, Burroughs pinned Russia's Atsamaz Sanakoev on May 7 at Beat the Streets.[63]

At the US World Team Trials of May 31 – June 1, Burroughs defeated Taylor for the third and fourth times in his senior career to secure the spot, the first match being a fairly dominant performance by the Olympic Gold medalist (6–2) and the second one being as close as the US Open's match between the two (6–5).[64] To warm up, Burroughs competed in Mexico City and claimed a Pan American title on July 15–17, while picking up a win over the accomplished Liván López from Cuba in the finals.[65][66]

At the World Championships of September 8–14, Burroughs advanced to the semifinals without much problem, beating the likes of four-time African Champion Augusto Midana (spraining his MCL throughout the match) and Rashid Kurbanov, who would go on to win the Asian Games Gold medal 20 days later. Despite initial success in the tournament, he was unable to secure his fourth consecutive World/Olympic title, as he was downed by Denis Tsargush with a score of 2–9 to get thrown to the third-place match, where he captured the bronze medal by pinning Rustam Dudaiev from Ukraine.[67] The loss to Tsargush marked the first time he had been defeated by an international wrestler in over 60 international matches.[68]

2015[edit]

Burroughs came back to competition on March 6–7, at the Alexander Medved Prizes International. He made his way to the gold medal in the stacked bracket, defeating the likes of Rashid Kurbanov, Ali Shabanau and Jakob Makarashvili in the process.[69]

Burroughs then competed on April 11–12 at the 15' World Cup. He powered through Cuba's representative Liván López, Russia's Iakubali Shikhdzhamalov, Mongolia's Pürevjavyn Önörbat and Iran's Morteza Rezaei Ghaleh to claim his fourth-straight World Cup.[70] He also downed Luis Quintana in his fifth-consecutive appearance at Beat the Streets, now on May 12.[71] At the US World Team Trials of June 12–14, Burroughs defeated the challenger Kyle Dake twice, winning by decision in the first match (6–3) and dismantling the later 15' US National champion with a technical fall (14–4).[72] To warm up, Burroughs won his second Pan American Games title on July 18, defeating Liván López (for the third time in his career), Jevon Balfour and Yoan Blanco.[73]

At the World Championships of September 12, Burroughs had a tough six-match run, being dominant on his way to the semifinals (scores of 5–2, TF 10–0, TF 11–0, 5–0) before bumping into European Games champion Aniuar Geduev, whom he was able to defeat in a close 4–3 match. At the finals, Burroughs outclassed his opponent Pürevjavyn Önörbat with a technical fall to help the USA place second at the tournament.[74]

2016[edit]

To start off the Olympic year, Burroughs won his second Yasar Dogu gold medal February 4–6, racking up notable wins over Soner Demirtaş and Zelimkhan Khadjiev.[75] He also won his second Pan American title on February 26–28, with dominant performances at the tournament.[76] At the US Olympic Team Trials of April 10, Burroughs dismantled 12' opponent Andrew Howe with a 9–3 in the first match and a technical fall in the second to make his second Olympic Team.[77] He also competed at Beat the Streets for the sixth time, now on May 19 against 15' Asian Champion Peyman Yarahmadi, whom he almost tech'd with an 11–2 score.[78]

Burroughs was then expected to compete at the World Cup on June 11–12, however, he chose to withdraw from the tournament as the birth of his second child was coming up.[79] Burroughs won his last tournament before the Summer Olympics at the Germany Grand Prix, on July 2, soundly defeating Bekzod Abdurakhmonov and Martin Obst.[80]

On August 19, Burroughs competed at the 2016 Summer Olympics, entering the tournament as a heavy-favorite to win his second gold medal.[81] After an 8–3 win in the Round of 16 against eight-time African Championships medalist Augusto Midana,[82] he wrestled Aniuar Geduev (whom he was 2–0 against) in the quarterfinals. After a match full of emotions, Burroughs was violently upset with a close 2–3 loss, which stunned the United States and sent him to the consolation bracket.[83] At the consolation semifinals, Burroughs was defeated in an impressive fashion, as Bekzod Abdurakhmonov (whom he had comfortably beaten a month prior) was able to pick up the win by technical fall over the American.[84] After being sent home, an emotional Burroughs with tears on his eyes, stated:

“I left my wife at home with two kids in Nebraska for long periods of time to go to training camps and tournaments in foreign countries, but she did that joyfully, not begrudgingly, because she knew on days like these I always performed. Now I feel like I let her down and I let my family down."[85]

2017[edit]

After a long lay-off, Burroughs came back to the scene at the World Cup on February 16–17, where he was able to put his name back on notice once with four victories over foreigner opponents.[86] He then went back to the National scene, as he competed at the US Open on April 26–29.[87] At the tournament, he outscored his opponents 32 points to 2 up until the finals, where he was able to edge long-time rival Kyle Dake with a 2–2 criteria win to claim his fourth US Open title.[88][89] On May 17, he defeated Sosuke Takatani at Beat the Streets.[90]

Burroughs then faced his US Open opponent Kyle Dake at the US World Team Trials on June 9–10. He lost the first match of the best-of-three via criteria, 6–6, but was able to conquer the spot in the two following bouts with convincing decisions, 8–4 and 6–2.[91][92] He travelled to Madrid to compete at the Spain Grand Prix on July 15–16, where he picked up four victories and notable ones over Taimuraz Friev and Jevon Balfour, winning all of his matches with the same score, 10–0.[93]

At the World Championships of August 26, Burroughs had a tough challenge in the first round, despite defeating the two-time World Championship bronze medalist Ali Shabanau with a close score of 7–5. He then advanced to the second round and quarterfinals, where he tech'd his opposition, downing his BTS opponent Sosuke Takatani with a score of 12–2 and Zelimkhan Khadjiev with a score of 13–2, respectively. He then proclaimed redemption at Bekzod Abdurakhmonov, whom he was tech'd by at the Olympics, with a score of 6–5 to pass on to the finale. At the finals, he faced Russian National Champion Khetag Tsabolov and was able to beat him 9–6 to reclaim his throne at 74 kilograms .[94][95]

After his World Championship run, Burroughs was named a Comeback Wrestler of the Year by United World Wrestling on December 27.[96]

2018[edit]

Burroughs started off the year strong by winning his sixth World Cup on April 7–8 at Iowa City, Iowa, bumping up his record at such tournament to 27–0 and clinching the team title for Team USA.[97] He then faced Frank Chamizo for the first time, going to a close and exciting come-from-behind 6–5 decision win,[98] giving birth to one of the best rivalries in recent wrestling history.[99]

He then made his eight World or Olympic team on June 8–9, at the 18' Final X: Lincoln,[100] where he was the crowd-favorite as Lincoln, Nebraska is the city where he attended college.[101] He did so by defeating US Open champion and NCAA legend Isaiah Martinez, with a 4–1 score in the first match and a case-closing 11–1 technical fall in the second.[102] Burroughs took a trip to Istanbul, Turkey to compete at the Yasar Dogu tournament on July 27–29, where he made the finale comfortably, to face Frank Chamizo.[103] In a high-scoring match packed with action, Burroughs found himself defeated by the Italian via criteria, 10–10 to make the series a tie and claim his first silver medal in his entire freestyle career since crossing over.[104]

At the World Championships of October 20–21, he defeated Mostafa Hosseinkhani from Iran in the opening round, 4–3, but suffered an upset in the quarterfinals to two-time and reigning Russian National champion and eventual winner of the championship Zaurbek Sidakov in a close 5–6 loss.[105] However, he came back in the consolation semis, where he defeated Miroslav Kirov from Belarus by a 9–0 decision. At the bronze medal match, he faced Frank Chamizo and was able to break the tie with a 4–4 criteria win to claim the third-place, therefore his sixth medal from Worlds.[106]

2019[edit]

Burroughs started off his athletic year in Bulgaria, at the Dan Kolov – Nikola Petrov Memorial of February 28 to March 3. In this tournament, he closed the Chamizo series with a convincing 9–2 win[107] and also got a notable victory over Bekzod Abdurakhmonov to claim the championship.[108] On April 19–21 Burroughs competed at his first Pan American Championships since 2016, and was able to claim his third title with notable victories over Franklin Gómez and Jevon Balfour.[109]

On May 6, Burroughs competed at Beat the Streets against UFC undefeated star and former Dan Hodge Trophy winner Ben Askren.[110] He was able to outclass the long-time retired wrestler via 11–0 technical fall.[111][112] On June 14–15, Burroughs made his seventh US World Team by claiming the spot at 19' Final X: Lincoln. Just like last year, he faced Isaiah Martinez, World Cup champion and two-time US Open champion, who pushed Burroughs to a closer series to last year's. In the first match, Burroughs won a close 5–4 decision, but was defeated via criteria in the second match (5–5) and was forced to come back with a dominant 7–1 to claim the series.[113]

On July 11–14, Burroughs claimed his second Yasar Dogu title, beating 18' U23 World champion Tajmuraz Salkazanov and Yakup Gör in the process. In the finals, he was scheduled to face Frank Chamizo,[114] however, Chamizo pulled out of the bout and Burroughs claimed gold.[115] On August 10, Burroughs took home his third Pan American games title with notable wins over Geandry Garzón and Franklin Gómez, helping to clinch the team title for the United States.[116]

At the World Championships of September 20–21, Burroughs started off with two close victories, coming from behind in both of them and winning 11–10 and 6–4 respectively. He then picked up a solid win to make his way into the semifinals, where he was once again stopped by Zaurbek Sidakov by one point scored in the last second in a 3–4 match, forcing him to compete for the bronze medal.[117] In the third-place match, he was able to defeat Mao Okui with a dominant 10–0 technical fall.[118]

2020[edit]

On March 6–9, Burroughs claimed his fourth Pan American Championship with dominant scores of 10–0, 3–0 and 8–1 over Jorge Llano, Geandry Garzón and Franklin Gómez.[109][119]

Burroughs was scheduled to compete at the 20' US Olympic Team Trials on April 4 at State College, Pennsylvania.[120] However, the event was postponed for 2021 along with the Summer Olympics due to the COVID-19 pandemic, leaving all the qualifiers unable to compete.[121]

After months of not being able to compete due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Burroughs wrestled two-time NCAA champion and '19 US National Champion at 86 kilos Zahid Valencia, at a catchweight of 185 pounds in the headline of FloWrestling: Burroughs vs. Valencia, on November 14.[122] At the weigh-ins, Burroughs weighed 178.2 pounds, while Valencia marked 184.1 pounds on the scale.[123] After being topped 0–4 in the first period, Burroughs overcame Valencia and took the lead, outscoring him 8–1 in the second period to mark the final score 8-5 and claim the dual.[124]

2021[edit]

After downing the number two-ranked 86 kilogram'er in the country, Burroughs had been booked to wrestle former rival and '18 World Champion David Taylor at 86 kilos, while headlining FloWrestling: Burroughs vs. Taylor, which would take place on January 9.[125] However, it was announced on January 8 that Taylor was unable to travel to Austin, Texas due to COVID-19 restrictions and the bout was subsequently postponed for four days later and changed its location for Lincoln, Nebraska, thus moving to a different card also named FloWrestling: Burroughs vs. Taylor.[126] After a 0-4 period, Burroughs rallied late to score four points of his own, but was unable to secure the victory as Taylor had criteria, defeating Burroughs for the first time in five matches.[127]

Personal life[edit]

Burroughs is a Christian. He has spoken about his faith saying, "A gold medal is always going to leave you empty. ... There's no other thing in life that's more fulfilling than a relationship with Jesus Christ. Contentment is one of the biggest things I've learned, knowing that regardless of where you are in life, it's all about being content with God's provision."[128] Burroughs is married to Lauren Burroughs (née Mariacher) and has three children, Beacon, Ora, and Rise.[129][130]

Burroughs is a football fan and supports the Buffalo Bills.[131]

Freestyle record[edit]

Freestyle matches
Res. Record Opponent Score Date Event Location
Loss 195–11 United States David Taylor 4-4 January 13, 2021 FloWrestling: Burroughs vs. Taylor

United States Lincoln, Nebraska

Win 195–10 United States Zahid Valencia 8-5 November 14, 2020 FloWrestling: Burroughs vs. Valencia

United States Austin, Texas

2020 Pan American Championships 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74 kg
Win 194–10 Puerto Rico Franklin Gómez 8–1 March 6–9, 2020 2020 Pan American Wrestling Championships Canada Ottawa, Canada
Win 193–10 Cuba Geandry Garzón 3–0
Win 192–10 Argentina Jorge Llano TF 10–0
2019 World Championships 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 191–10 Japan Mao Okui TF 10–0 September 20–21, 2019 2019 World Wrestling Championships Kazakhstan Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan
Loss 190–10 Russia Zaurbek Sidakov 3–4
Win 190–9 Azerbaijan Khadzhimurad Gadzhiyev 8–1
Win 189–9 Hungary Murad Kuramagomedov 6–4
Win 188–9 Belarus Azamat Nurykau 11–10
2019 Pan American Games 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 187–9 Puerto Rico Franklin Gómez 4–1 August 10, 2019 2019 Pan American Games Peru Lima, Perú
Win 186–9 Cuba Geandry Garzón TF 15–4
Win 185–9 Peru Abel Herrera TF 10–0
2019 Yaşar Doğu 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 184–9 Turkey Yakup Gör TF 12–2 July 11–14, 2019 2019 Yaşar Doğu Turkey Istanbul, Turkey
Win 183–9 Slovakia Tajmuraz Salkazanov 6–4
Win 182–9 Hungary Csaba Vida TF 10–0
2019 Final X: Lincoln 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 181–9 United States Isaiah Martinez 7–1 June 14–15, 2019 2019 US World Team Trials United States Lincoln, Nebraska
Loss 180–9 United States Isaiah Martinez 5–5
Win 180–8 United States Isaiah Martinez 5–4
Win 179–8 United States Ben Askren TF 11–0 May 6, 2019 2019 Beat The Streets: Grapple at the Garden

United States New York City, New York

2019 Pan American Championships 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 178–8 Canada Jevon Balfour 7–0 April 19–21, 2019 2019 Pan American Wrestling Championships Argentina Buenos Aires, Argentina
Win 177–8 Venezuela Adonis Arroyo TF 10–0
Win 176–8 Puerto Rico Franklin Gómez 5–2
Win 175–8 Ecuador Freddy Vera 9–0
2019 Dan Kolov – Nikola Petrov 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 174–8 Uzbekistan Bekzod Abdurakhmonov 4–3 February 28 – March 3, 2019 2019 Dan Kolov – Nikola Petrov Memorial Bulgaria Ruse, Bulgaria
Win 173–8 Bulgaria Ali Umarpashaev 7–2
Win 172–8 Italy Frank Chamizo 9–2
Win 171–8 India Jitender 9–0
2018 World Championships 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 170–8 Italy Frank Chamizo 4–4 October 20–21, 2018 2018 World Wrestling Championships Hungary Budapest, Hungary
Win 169–8 Belarus Miroslav Kirov 9–0
Loss 168–8 Russia Zaurbek Sidakov 5–6
Win 167–7 Iran Mostafa Hosseinkhani 4–3
2018 Yaşar Doğu 2nd place, silver medalist(s) at 74kg
Loss 166–7 Italy Frank Chamizo 10–10 July 27–29, 2018 2018 Yaşar Doğu Turkey Istanbul, Turkey
Win 166–6 Kazakhstan Bolat Sakayev 9–4
Win 165–6 Belarus Nurykan Azamat TF 10–0
Win 164–6 Iraq Saeed Zervanatareq TF 10–0
2018 Final X: Lincoln 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 163–6 United States Isaiah Martinez TF 11–1 June 8–9, 2018 2018 US World Team Trials United States Lincoln, Nebraska
Win 162–6 United States Isaiah Martinez 4–1
Win 161–6 Italy Frank Chamizo 6–5 May 17, 2018 2018 Beat The Streets: Team USA vs. The World All-Stars

United States New York City, New York

2018 World Cup 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 160–6 Azerbaijan Gasjimurad Omarov Fall April 7–8, 2018 2018 World Cup United States Iowa City, Iowa
Win 159–6 Georgia (country) Tarzan Maisuradze TF 10–0
Win 158–6 Japan Yuhi Fujinami 7–1
2017 World Championships 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 157–6 Russia Khetag Tsabolov 9–6 August 21–27, 2017 2017 World Wrestling Championships France Paris, France
Win 156–6 Uzbekistan Bekzod Abdurakhmonov 6–5
Win 155–6 France Zelimkhan Khadjiev TF 13–2
Win 154–6 Japan Sosuke Takatani TF 12–2
Win 153–6 Belarus Ali Shabanau 7–5
2017 Spain Grand Prix 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 152–6 Canada Jevon Balfour TF 10–0 July 15–16, 2017 2017 Grand Prix of Spain Spain Madrid, Spain
Win 151–6 Iran Seyedali Mousavi TF 10–0
Win 150–6 Kazakhstan Nurgaliy Zholayev TF 10–0
Win 149–6 Spain Taimuraz Friev TF 10–0
2017 US World Team Trials 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 148–6 United States Kyle Dake 6–2 June 9–10, 2017 2017 US World Team Trials United States Lincoln, Nebraska
Win 147–6 United States Kyle Dake 8–4
Loss 146–6 United States Kyle Dake 6–6
Win 146–5 Japan Sosuke Takatani 9–2 May 17, 2017 2017 Beat The Streets: Times Square

United States New York City, New York

2017 US Open 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 145–5 United States Kyle Dake 2–2 April 26–29, 2017 2017 US Open Championships United States Las Vegas, Nevada
Win 144–5 United States Kevin Levalley TF 12–2
Win 143–5 United States Dan Vallimont 6–0
Win 142–5 United States Michael Moreno 4–0
Win 141–5 United States Jeremy Anderson TF 10–0
2017 World Cup 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 140–5 Iran Peyman Yarahmadi 3–2 February 16–17, 2017 2017 World Cup Iran Kermanshah, Iran
Win 139–5 Azerbaijan Murad Suleymanov DQ
Win 138–5 Russia Atsamaz Sanakoev 10–1
Win 137–5 Georgia (country) Jumber Kvelashvili 2–2
2016 Summer Olympics 9th at 74 kg
Loss 136–5 Uzbekistan Bekzod Abdurakhmonov TF 1–11 August 19, 2016 2016 Summer Olympics Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Loss 136–4 Russia Aniuar Geduev 2–3
Win 136–3 Guinea-Bissau Augusto Midana 8–3
2016 Germany Grand Prix 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 135–3 Germany Martin Obst 3–1 July 2, 2016 2016 Grand Prix of Germany Germany Dortmund, Germany
Win 134–3 Uzbekistan Bekzod Abdurakhmonov 9–3
Win 133–3 Poland Andrzej Sokalski TF 10–0
Win 132–3 Germany Markus Knobel TF 10–0
Win 131–3 Iran Peyman Yarahmadi 11–2 May 19, 2016 2016 Beat The Streets: United In The Square

United States New York City, New York

2016 US Olympic Team Trials 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 130–3 United States Andrew Howe TF 10–0 April 10, 2016 2016 US Olympic Team Trials United States Iowa City, Iowa
Win 129–3 United States Andrew Howe 9–3
2016 Pan American Championships 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 128–3 Colombia Carlos Izquierdo TF 12–2 February 26–28, 2016 2016 Pan American Championships United States Frisco, Texas
Win 127–3 Canada Ilya Abelev TF 13–0
Win 126–3 Puerto Rico Francisco Soler Fall
Win 125–3 Guatemala Pedro Martinez 11–5
2016 Yaşar Doğu 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 124–3 France Zelimkhan Khadjiev TF 14–3 February 4–6, 2016 2016 Yaşar Doğu Turkey Istanbul, Turkey
Win 123–3 Turkey Soner Demirtaş 5–0
Win 122–3 Turkey Abdullah Arslan TF 10–0
Win 121–3 Puerto Rico Pedro Soto TF 10–0
2015 World Championships 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74 kg
Win 120–3 Mongolia Pürevjavyn Önörbat TF 10–0 September 12, 2015 2015 World Wrestling Championships United States Las Vegas, Nevada
Win 119–3 Russia Aniuar Geduev 4–3
Win 118–3 Iran Alireza Ghasemi 5–0
Win 117–3 Hungary Mihály Nagy TF 11–0
Win 116–3 Ukraine Oleg Zakharevych TF 10–0
Win 115–3 Poland Krystian Brzozowski 5–2
2015 Pan American Games 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74 kg
Win 114–3 Ecuador Yoan Blanco TF 11–0 July 18, 2015 2015 Pan American Games Canada Toronto, Ontario
Win 113–3 Canada Jevon Balfour TF 11–0
Win 112–3 Cuba Livan Lopez TF 13–3
2015 US World Team Trials 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 111–3 United States Kyle Dake TF 14–4 June 12–14, 2015 2015 US World Team Trials United States Madison, Wisconsin
Win 110–3 United States Kyle Dake 6–3
Win 109–3 Cuba Luis Esteban Quintana Martinez Fall May 12, 2015 2015 Beat The Streets: Salsa in the Square

United States New York City, New York

2015 World Cup 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 108–3 Iran Morteza Rezaei Ghaleh TF 10–0 April 11–12, 2015 2015 World Cup United States Los Angeles, California
Win 107–3 Mongolia Pürevjavyn Önörbat 6–0
Win 106–3 Russia Iakubali Shikhdzhamalov TF 10–0
Win 105–3 Cuba Liván López 6–2
2015 Alexander Medved International 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 104–3 Georgia (country) Jakob Makarashvili TF 12–1 March 6–7, 2015 2015 Alexander Medved International Belarus Minsk, Belarus
Win 103–3 Belarus Ali Shabanau 10–6
Win 102–3 Uzbekistan Rashid Kurbanov 6–5
Win 101–3 Russia Askhab Geriev TF 10–0
Win 100–3 Russia Gadzhi Gadzhiev 5–0
Win 99–3 Uzbekistan Islomiddin Rakhimov TF 10–0
2014 World Championships 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 98–3 Ukraine Rustam Dudaiev Fall September 8–14, 2014 2014 World Wrestling Championships Uzbekistan Tashkent, Uzbekistan
Loss 97–3 Russia Denis Tsargush 2–9
Win 97–2 Uzbekistan Rashid Kurbanov 5–0
Win 96–2 South Korea Lee Yun-seok TF 13–2
Win 95–2 Guinea-Bissau Augusto Midana 4–3
2014 Pan American Championship 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 94–2 Cuba Livan Lopez TF 13–2 July 15–17, 2014 2014 Pan American Championships Mexico Mexico City, Mexico
Win 93–2 Venezuela Adonis Arroyo TF 10–0
Win 92–2 Peru Jose Santos Ambrocio TF 10–0
Win 91–2 Bolivia Elio Zenteno TF 10–0
2014 US World Team Trials 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 90–2 United States David Taylor 6–5 May 31 – June 1, 2014 2014 US World Team Trials United States Madison, Wisconsin
Win 89–2 United States David Taylor 6–2
Win 88–2 Russia Atsamaz Sanakoev Fall May 7, 2014 2014 Beat The Streets: Team USA vs. The World

United States New York City, New York

2014 US Open 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 87–2 United States David Taylor 7–6 April 15–19, 2014 2014 US Open Championships United States Las Vegas, Nevada
Win 86–2 United States Quinton Godley TF 10–0
Win 85–2 United States Taylor West TF 12–2
Win 84–2 United States Chance Goodman TF 10–0
Win 83–2 United States Matt Donohoe TF 11–0
2014 World Cup 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 82–2 Turkey Murat Erturk Fall March 15–16, 2014 2014 World Cup United States Los Angeles, California
Win 81–2 Iran Ezzatollah Akbari 7–1
Win 80–2 Ukraine Chikhladze Giya TF 15–4
Win 79–2 India Parveen Rana Fall
Win 78–2 Armenia Varuzhan Kajoyan TF 16–6
2014 Yaşar Doğu 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 77–2 Russia Batuhan Demircin 10–2 February 15–16, 2014 2014 Yaşar Doğu Turkey Istanbul, Turkey
Win 76–2 Russia Khabib Batyrov TF 10–0
Loss 75–2 United States Nick Marable 4–4
Win 75–1 Mongolia Pürevjavyn Önörbat TF 10–0
Win 74–1 Uzbekistan Rashid Kurbanov 6–0
2013 World Championships 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 71–1 Iran Ezzatollah Akbari 4–0 September 16–22, 2013 2013 World Wrestling Championships Hungary Budapest, Hungary
Win 70–1 Belarus Ali Shabanau DQ
Win 69–1 Azerbaijan Jabrayil Hasanov TF 7–0
Win 68–1 India Narsingh Pancham Yadav TF 7–0
Win 67–1 Tajikistan Gamid Dzhalilov TF 9–2
2013 Stepan Sargsyan International 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 66–1 Russia Akamaz Sanakoev 7–6 August 3–4, 2013 2013 Stepan Sargsyan International Armenia Vanadzor, Armenia
Win 65–1 Russia Stanislav Khachirov TF 9–1
Win 64–1 Armenia Gevorg Hambarcumyan TF 10–3
Win 63–1 Georgia (country) Giorgi Sanodze TF 8–0
2013 US World Team Trials 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 62–1 United States Kyle Dake OT 8–6 June 21–23, 2013 2013 US World Team Trials United States Stillwater, Oklahoma
Win 61–1 United States Kyle Dake 7–0
Win 60–1 Russia Saba Khubezhty TF 14–3 May 19, 2013 2013 Beat The Streets: United 4 Wrestling

United States Los Angeles, California

Win 59–1 Russia Saba Khubezhty 1–1, 5–0, 7–3 May 15, 2013 2013 Rumble on the Rails

United States New York City, New York

2013 US Open 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 58–1 United States David Taylor 3–1, 1–0 April 17–19, 2013 2013 US Open Championships United States Las Vegas, Nevada
Win 57–1 United States Colton Sponseller 1–0, 4–0
Win 56–1 United States Nate Carr 2–0, 6–0
Win 55–1 United States Joe Latham TF 6–0, 6–0
2013 Alexander Medved International 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 54–1 Ukraine Dmitry Rochnyak March 1–2, 2013 2013 Alexander Medved International Belarus Minsk, Belarus
Win 53–1 Russia Magomed Zubairov
Win 52–1 Ukraine Andri Nagornyi
Win 51–1 Kazakhstan Ablaikhan Mursultanov
Win 50–1 United States Colt Sponseller
2013 World Cup 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 49–1 Belarus Ali Shabanau 1–1, 5–0 February 21–22, 2013 2013 World Cup Iran Tehran, Iran
Win 48–1 Bulgaria Miroslav Kirov TF 7–0, 6–0
Win 47–1 Iran Ezzatollah Akbari 4–0, 2–0
Win 46–1 Japan Sosuke Takatani 2–0, 7–1
Win 45–1 Georgia (country) Jakov Makarashvili 2–0, 1–0
2012 Summer Olympics 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 44–1 Iran Sadegh Goudarzi 1–0, 1–0 August 5–12, 2012 2012 Summer Olympics United Kingdom London, United Kingdom
Win 43–1 Russia Denis Tsargush 3–1, 0–2, 2–1
Win 42–1 Canada Matt Gentry 2–1, 1–1
Win 41–1 Puerto Rico Francisco Soler 4–0, 6–0
Win 40–1 Russia Kamel Malikov 8–0, 5–0 June 7, 2012 2012 Beat The Streets: Grapple in the Apple

United States New York City, New York

2012 World Cup 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 39–1 Georgia (country) Davit Khutsishvili May 12–13, 2012 2012 World Cup Azerbaijan Baku, Azerbaijan
Win 38–1 Iran Sadegh Goudarzi
Win 37–1 Turkey Demirsin Batuhan
Win 36–1 Japan Sosuke Takatani 4–5, 3–1, 3–2
Win 35–1 Russia Akhmed Gadzhimagomedov
2012 US Olympic Team Trials 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 34–1 United States Andrew Howe 4–2, 1–2, 1–0 April 21, 2012 2012 US Olympic Team Trials United States Iowa City, Iowa
2012 Cerro Pelado International 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 33–1 United States Trent Paulson 2–1, 5–1 February 14–15, 2012 2012 Cerro Pelado International Cuba Habana, Cuba
Win 32–1 United States Nick Marable 1–0, 1–1
Win 31–1 Argentina Ivan Llano 7–0, 6–0
2012 Dave Schultz M. International 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 30–1 United States Trent Paulson 1–0, 6–0 February 1–4, 2012 2012 Dave Schultz Memorial International United States Colorado Springs, Colorado
Win 29–1 United States Tyler Caldwell 1–0, 1–0
Win 28–1 Uzbekistan Muzaffar Abdurakhmanov 1–0, 5–0
Win 27–1 Italy Carmelo Lumia Fall
Win 26–1 Japan Kohei Kitamura 1–0, 3–0
2011 Pan American Games 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 25–1 Cuba Yunierki Blanco 3–2, 3–2 October 20–24, 2011 2011 Pan American Games Mexico Guadalajara, Mexico
Win 24–1 Venezuela Ricardo Roberty 2–1, 1–1
Win 23–1 Ecuador Jose Mercado 7–0, 6–0
2011 World Championships 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 22–1 Iran Sadegh Goudarzi 3–2, 4–1 September 12–18, 2011 2011 World Wrestling Championships Turkey Istanbul, Turkey
Win 21–1 Azerbaijan Ashraf Aliyev 0–2, 5–4, 3–0
Win 20–1 Venezuela Ricardo Roberty 2–1, 1–0
Win 19–1 Russia Denis Tsargush 1–3, 1–0, 2–1
Win 18–1 Ukraine Dmytro Rochniak 3–1, 4–2
2011 Ukrainian Memorial International 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 17–1 Russia Alibek Agbayev 3–1, 6–0 July 23–24, 2011 2011 Ukrainian Memorial International Ukraine Kyiv, Ukraine
Win 16–1 Armenia Musa Murtazaliev 1–0, 4–1
Win 15–1 Ukraine Giya Chikhladze 2–1, 5–0
Win 14–1 Russia Zelim Perisayev 3–1, 4–0
Win 13–1 Kyrgyzstan Ilgiz Jakupbekov
2011 US World Team Trials 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 12–1 United States Andrew Howe 3–1, 1–0 June 9–11, 2011 2011 US World Team Trials United States Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Win 11–1 United States Andrew Howe 1–0, 1–2, 3–2
Win 10–1 Russia Aniuar Geduev 1–0, 2–1 May 5, 2011 2011 Beat The Streets: USA vs. Russia

United States New York City, New York

2011 US Open 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 74kg
Win 9–1 United States Nick Marable 0–3, 1–0, 3–0 April 7–10, 2011 2011 US Open Championships United States Cleveland, Ohio
Win 8–1 United States Kirk White 4–2, 3–2
Win 7–1 United States Lloyd Rogers 3–0, 8–0
Win 6–1 United States Bobby Nash Fall
2007 US University Nationals 2nd place, silver medalist(s) at 66kg
Loss 5–1 United States Teyon Ware 1–1, 0–1 April 22, 2007 2007 US University National Championships United States Akron, Ohio
Win 5–0 United States Ryan Needle 4–2, 3–2
Win 4–0 United States Nathaniel Holt TF 8–2, 6–0
Win 3–0 United States Ryan Williams 4–3, 7–0
Win 2–0 United States David Christian 9–1, 6–1
Win 1–0 United States Gabriel Mooney 3–0, 3–0

NCAA record[edit]

NCAA Championships Matches
Res. Record Opponent Score Date Event
2011 NCAA Championships 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 165 lbs
Win 15–3 Tyler Caldwell MD 11–3 March 17–19, 2011 2011 NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships
Win 14–3 Colt Sponseller MD 14–6
Win 13–3 Ryan Leblanc TF 23–8
Win 12–3 Ethan Headlee TF 23–7
2009 NCAA Championships 1st place, gold medalist(s) at 157 lbs
Win 11–3 Mike Poeta 5–1 March 19–21, 2009 2009 NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships
Win 10–3 Gregor Gillespie MD 12–4
Win 9–3 Cyler Sanderson MD 14–6
Win 8–3 Colton Salazar Fall
Win 7–3 Hadley Harrison TF 23–7
2008 NCAA Championships 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) at 149 lbs
Win 6–3 Josh Churella 4–2 March 20–22, 2008 2008 NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships
Win 5–3 J.P. O'Connor 5–3
Loss 4–3 Brent Metcalf 4–8
Win 4–2 Josh Churella 3–2
Win 3–2 Ed McCray TF 21–5
Win 2–2 Cesar Grajales 4–1
2007 NCAA Championships at 149 lbs
Loss 1–2 Matt Storniolo SV-4 1–6 March 15–17, 2007 2007 NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships
Win 1–1 Matt Dunn 8–2
Loss 0–1 Dustin Schlatter 2–3

Awards and honors[edit]

2020
  • 1st place, gold medalist(s) Pan American Championships (74 kg)
2019
2018
2017
2016
  • 1st place, gold medalist(s) Pan American Championships (74 kg)
  • 1st place, gold medalist(s) Grand Prix of Germany (74 kg)
  • 1st place, gold medalist(s) Yasar Dogu (74 kg)
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2009
2008

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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