Jorge Orosmán da Silva

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This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is da Silva and the second or maternal family name is Echeverrito.
Jorge da Silva
Jorge da Silva.jpg
Da Silva as manager of Peñarol in 2012
Personal information
Full name Jorge Orosmán da Silva Echeverrito
Date of birth (1961-12-11) 11 December 1961 (age 55)
Place of birth Montevideo, Uruguay
Height 1.82 m (5 ft 11 12 in)
Playing position Striker
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1977 Fénix
1977 Danubio
1978–1982 Defensor
1982–1985 Valladolid 62 (24)
1985–1987 Atlético Madrid 58 (21)
1987–1988 River Plate 58 (23)
1989–1990 Palestino
1991–1994 América Cali 172 (65)
1995 Millonarios 10 (3)
1995–1997 Defensor 43 (7)
National team
1982–1993 Uruguay 26 (6)
Teams managed
2007–2009 Defensor
2009–2010 Al Nassr
2010–2011 Godoy Cruz
2012 Banfield
2012–2013 Peñarol
2013–2014 Baniyas
2014–2015 Al Nassr
2016 Peñarol
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Jorge Orosmán da Silva Echeverrito (born 11 December 1961) is a Uruguayan former footballer who played as a striker, and a current manager.

Nicknamed "Polilla" ("Moth" in English),[1] he played professionally in four countries his own notwithstanding. In 2007, he embarked in a managerial career.

Da Silva played nearly 30 times with Uruguay, representing the nation at the 1986 World Cup and the 1993 Copa América tournaments.

Club career[edit]

Born in Montevideo, da Silva made his debut in 1977 for Centro Atlético Fénix. He then had a short spell with Danubio F.C. before joining Defensor Sporting in 1978.

In late 1982, da Silva moved to Spain, where he started playing for Real Valladolid and won the Pichichi Trophy (for the league's top scorer) in 1983–84, with 17 goals in 30 matches. He was only the second club player ever to win the award,[2] and he also help add its first piece of silverware in the same season, the Copa de la Liga; he then represented Atlético Madrid after Hugo Sánchez left for Real Madrid,[3] and netted 21 La Liga goals in two seasons, helping the team to the Copa del Rey and the Supercopa de España, both in 1985.

In 1987, da Silva returned to South America and signed for Club Atlético River Plate of Argentina. Two years later he went to Colombia to play for América de Cali, winning the Categoría Primera A twice during his four-year spell.

After another year in the country, with Millonarios FC, da Silva returned to his native land and joined Defensor Sporting, where he retired at nearly 36. The following decade he began his coaching career, with Uruguay's youth teams; in 2007, he returned to his last club.

Da Silva led Defensor to the Uruguayan League in 2008, and reached the quarter-finals of the following year's Copa Libertadores.[4] After two years, he moved to the Saudi Professional League with Al-Nassr FC.

On 15 December 2010, Argentine Primera División team Godoy Cruz Antonio Tomba announced the hiring of da Silva as Omar Asad's replacement.[5] On 27 February 2012 he left fellow league side Club Atlético Banfield to return to his country and join C.A. Peñarol,[6] where he went on to conquer two titles including the 2013 national championship.[7]

On 19 June 2013, da Silva was appointed head coach at Baniyas Club in the UAE Arabian Gulf League.[8] He returned to Peñarol in January 2016[9] following a second spell with Al-Nassr,[10] leaving the former on 9 October due to poor results.[11]

International career[edit]

Having made his debut for Uruguay on 20 February 1982, in a 2–2 draw against South Korea for the Nehru Cup, da Silva went on to earn a further 25 caps. He was part of the squad at the 1986 FIFA World Cup, going scoreless in three matches (out of four) and being booked twice.[12]

Honours[edit]

Player[edit]

Valladolid
América Cali

Manager[edit]

Defensor
Peñarol
Al-Nassr

Individual[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Da Silva y Yañez dos estrellas en prestamo" [Da Silva and Yañez two stars on loan]. El País (in Spanish). 1 December 1983. Retrieved 27 March 2017. 
  2. ^ "Se cumplen 27 años del debut de Da Silva con el Valladolid" [27th birthday of Da Silva's debut with Valladolid]. El Día de Valladolid (in Spanish). 7 January 2011. Retrieved 27 March 2017. 
  3. ^ "Luis no seguirá como entrenador del Atlético" [Luis will not continue as Atlético manager]. El País (in Spanish). 30 June 1987. Retrieved 27 March 2017. 
  4. ^ "Defensor eliminado en cuartos" [Defensor ousted in quarter-finals]. El Espectador (in Spanish). 18 June 2009. Retrieved 28 March 2017. 
  5. ^ "Godoy Cruz reemplazó al Turco por el Polilla Da Silva" [Godoy Cruz replaced the Turk with Moth Da Silva]. La Nación (in Spanish). 15 December 2010. Retrieved 15 December 2010. 
  6. ^ Da Silva dejó Bánfield y se fue a Peñarol (Da Silva left Banfield and went to Peñarol); Urgente24, 27 February 2012 (in Spanish)
  7. ^ "¡Peñarol es el campeón uruguayo 2012–2013!" [Peñarol is 2012–2013 Uruguayan champion!] (in Spanish). CA Peñarol. 2013. Retrieved 28 March 2017. 
  8. ^ "Bani Yas name Jorge da Silva as new head coach". UAE Pro League Committee. 19 June 2013. Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  9. ^ "Jorge "Polilla" Da Silva, nuevo técnico de Peñarol" [Jorge "Polilla" Da Silva, new Peñarol manager]. El Espectador (in Spanish). 22 January 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2017. 
  10. ^ "El Al Nassr anuncia el fichaje del italiano Cannavaro como nuevo técnico" [Al Nassr announce signing of Italian Cannavaro as new manager]. Sport (in Spanish). 22 November 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2017. 
  11. ^ "Jorge Da Silva renunció como entrenador de Peñarol" [Jorge Da Silva renounced as Peñarol manager] (in Spanish). Teledoce. 9 October 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2017. 
  12. ^ Jorge da SilvaFIFA competition record
  13. ^ "25 años de la Copa de la Liga" [25 years from the League Cup]. El Norte de Castilla (in Spanish). 2009. Retrieved 27 March 2017. 
  14. ^ "Spain – List of Topscorers ("Pichichi") 1929–2015". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 27 March 2017. 

External links[edit]