Joris Voorhoeve

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Joris Voorhoeve

Joris Voorhoeve - bevrijdingsfestival 2014 (3).JPG
Joris Voorhoeve in 2014
Advisory Member of
the Council of State
In office
1 September 2010 – 1 January 2011
Extraordinary Member
of the Council of State
In office
1 October 2006 – 1 September 2010
Member of the Council of State
In office
1 December 1999 – 1 October 2006
Vice PresidentHerman Tjeenk Willink
Minister of Defence
In office
22 August 1994 – 3 August 1998
Prime MinisterWim Kok
Preceded byRelus ter Beek
Succeeded byFrank de Grave
Minister for Netherlands
Antilles and Aruba Affairs
In office
22 August 1994 – 3 August 1998
Prime MinisterWim Kok
Preceded byRuud Lubbers
Succeeded byBram Peper
(as Minister of the Interior
and Kingdom Relations
)
Leader of the People's Party
for Freedom and Democracy
In office
15 December 1986 – 30 April 1990
Preceded byRudolf de Korte
Succeeded byFrits Bolkestein
Parliamentary leader in the
House of Representatives
In office
9 July 1986 – 30 April 1990
Preceded byEd Nijpels
Succeeded byFrits Bolkestein
Parliamentary groupPeople's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Member of the House of Representatives
In office
19 May 1998 – 1 December 1999
In office
16 September 1982 – 10 January 1991
Parliamentary groupPeople's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Personal details
Born
Joris Jacob Clemens Voorhoeve

(1945-12-22) 22 December 1945 (age 73)
The Hague, Netherlands
NationalityDutch
Political partyDemocrats 66
(from 2009, 1969–1971)
Other political
affiliations
People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy

(1975–2010)
Spouse(s)
Judith Jaffe (m. 1976)
ResidenceThe Hague, Netherlands
Alma materWageningen University
(Bachelor of Economics)
Leiden University
(Bachelor of Social Science, Master of Social Science, Bachelor of Engineering, Master of Engineering)
Johns Hopkins University
(Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy)
OccupationPolitician · Political scientist · Researcher · Nonprofit director · Author · Professor

Joris Jacob Clemens Voorhoeve (born 22 December 1945) is a retired Dutch politician of the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD).

Voorhoeve, a Political scientist by occupation, was elected as a Member of the House of Representatives on 16 September 1982 after the general election of 1982. After the general election of 1986 the Leader of the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy and Parliamentary leader in the House of Representatives Ed Nijpels resigned and Voorhoeve was chosen to succeed him in both positions. He later served as Minister of Defence and Minister for Netherlands Antilles and Aruba Affairs in the First Kok cabinet from 22 August 1994 until 3 August 1998. He received severe criticism[1] for his role in the Srebrenica massacre but did not resign. He served as Member of the Council of State from 1 December 1999 until 1 January 2011.

In 2010 he left the VVD and joined the Democrats 66 party.[2]

Voorhoeve is also a member of the Dutch Foreign Ministry's Advisory Council on International Affairs and of the Trilateral Commission.[3]

His son is the political philosopher Alex Voorhoeve.[4]

Joris Voorhoeve served as Co-Chair of the Board of the Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict, GPPAC, from 2010 till 2017, and as Chair of the Board of the foregoing institution, the European Centre for Conflict Prevention, ECCP, from 2007.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-02-22. Retrieved 2012-11-14.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Rutte betreurt vertrek Voorhoeve - archief". Nrc.nl. 2010-09-20. Retrieved 2016-05-19.
  3. ^ "Adviesraad Internationale Vraagstukken". Aiv-advies.nl. Retrieved 2016-05-19.
  4. ^ Jonathan Witteman, "Zoon Kadhafi schreef dissertatie over democratie 'en pleegde plagiaat'," de Volkskrant, February 24, 2011.

External links[edit]

Official
Party political offices
Preceded by
Rudolf de Korte
Leader of the People's Party
for Freedom and Democracy

1986–1990
Succeeded by
Frits Bolkestein
Preceded by
Ed Nijpels
Parliamentary leader of the
People's Party for Freedom and Democracy
in the House of Representatives

1986–1990
Political offices
Preceded by
Ruud Lubbers
Minister for Netherlands
Antilles and Aruba Affairs

1994–1998
Succeeded by
Bram Peper
Preceded by
Relus ter Beek
Minister of Defence
1994–1998
Succeeded by
Frank de Grave