José Bordalás

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Pepe Bordalás
Personal information
Full name José Bordalás Jiménez
Date of birth (1964-03-05) 5 March 1964 (age 53)
Place of birth Alicante, Spain
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current team
Getafe (coach)
Youth career
SCD San Blas
1976–1980 Hércules
1977–1978 → Contestano (loan)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1980–1987 Hércules
1980–1981 Español San Vicente (loan)
1981–1982 Orihuela Deportiva (loan)
1982–1983 Villajoyosa (loan)
1983–1984 → Rayo Ibense (loan)
1984–1987 Benidorm (loan)
1987–1988 Dénia
1988 Torrevieja
1989–1990 Petrelense
1990–1991 Español San Vicente
1991–1992 Altea
Teams managed
1993–1994 Alicante B
1994–1995 Alicante
1995–1996 Benidorm
1996–1997 Eldense
1997–1998 Mutxavista
1998–2002 Alicante
2002–2003 Novelda
2004–2006 Alicante
2006 Hércules
2007–2009 Alcoyano
2009–2012 Elche
2012–2013 Alcorcón
2014–2015 Alcorcón
2015–2016 Alavés
2016– Getafe
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Bordalás and the second or maternal family name is Jiménez.

José "Pepe" Bordalás Jiménez (born 5 March 1964 in Alicante, Valencian Community) is a Spanish retired footballer who played as a striker, and the current manager of Getafe CF.

Playing career[edit]

During his career, Bordalás never played in higher than the fourth division and regional championships. He was under contract with Hércules CF for seven years, but never appeared officially for the team, being loaned five times which included a three-season spell with neighbouring Benidorm CF.

Released in 1988, Bordalás subsequently represented CD Dénia, FC Torrevieja, Petrelense, FC Jove Español San Vicente and UD Altea, retiring from football at only 28 due to injury.

Coaching career[edit]

As he had done whilst a player, Bordalás worked exclusively in the Valencian Community,[1] his first job being at Alicante CF's reserves in 1993, being appointed at the main squad the following year.

After three years with as many teams, Bordalás returned to Alicante in 1998, taking them from the regional leagues to the third division in only three seasons. His first experience in the second level arrived with former club Hércules, replacing fired Juan Carlos Mandiá midway through the 2005–06 season and being sacked himself only seven games into the following campaign.

Bordalás returned to division three in 2007–08 with CD Alcoyano, leading the side to the first position in the following season and the subsequent failure in the promotion playoffs. In early October 2009 he terminated his contract amicably, signing with Elche CF in the second tier.[2]

After two spells at AD Alcorcón,[3][4] Bordalás was named Deportivo Alavés manager on 11 June 2015.[5] He led the team back to La Liga after ten years in his first season, as champions,[6] but was still sacked on 21 June 2016.[7]

Personal life[edit]

Bordalás' cousin, Juan Ignacio Martínez, is also a football coach.[8]

Managerial statistics[edit]

As of 22 January 2017
Team Nat Year Record
P W D L Win %
Alicante B[9] Spain 1993–94 38 26 9 3 68.42
Alicante[10] Spain 1994–95 38 13 13 12 34.21
Benidorm[11] Spain 1995–96 40 11 13 16 27.50
Eldense[12] Spain 1996–97 40 17 11 12 42.50
Mutxavista Spain 1997–98 38 17 6 15 44.74
Alicante[11] Spain 2004–06 78 42 20 16 53.85
Hércules[11] Spain 2006 27 11 4 12 40.74
Alcoyano[11] Spain 2007–09 74 33 24 17 44.59
Elche[11] Spain 2009–12 118 52 30 36 44.07
Alcorcón[11] Spain 2012–13 46 22 7 17 47.83
Alcorcón[11] Spain 2014–15 61 21 22 18 34.43
Alavés[13] Spain 2015–16 44 22 12 10 50.00
Getafe Spain 2016– 15 8 6 1 53.33

Honours[edit]

Manager[edit]

Alavés

References[edit]

  1. ^ Interview-chat; Diario Información, 10 February 2009 (in Spanish)
  2. ^ Bordalás: "Vengo ilusionado" (Bordalás: "I arrive with the illusion"); Diario AS, 5 October 2009 (in Spanish)
  3. ^ "José Bordálas, nuevo entrenador del Alcorcón" [José Bordalás, new manager of Alcorcón] (in Spanish). Sport. 27 June 2012. Retrieved 12 June 2016. 
  4. ^ "El Alcorcón prescinde de Miguel Álvarez y recupera a José Bordalás" [Alcorcón make do without Miguel Álvarez and bring back José Bordalás] (in Spanish). Europa Press. 5 February 2014. Retrieved 12 June 2016. 
  5. ^ "El Deportivo Alavés cierra el fichaje de José Bordalás" [Alavés complete signing of José Bordalás] (in Spanish). Deportivo Alavés. 11 June 2015. Retrieved 12 June 2016. 
  6. ^ "El Alavés vuelve a Primera" [Alavés returns to Primera] (in Spanish). El País. 29 May 2016. Retrieved 21 June 2016. 
  7. ^ "Bordalás deja de pertenecer a la disciplina del Alavés" [Bordalás leaves Alavés] (in Spanish). Deportivo Alavés. 21 June 2016. Retrieved 11 August 2016. 
  8. ^ "Somos como hermanos, pero buscaremos ganar" ("We are like brothers, but we will play to win"); Diario AS, 25 March 2010 (in Spanish)
  9. ^ "Primera Regional Valenciana (Grupo 5) 1993–94" [Primera Regional Valenciana (Group 5) 1993–94] (in Spanish). Futbolme. Retrieved 17 February 2016. 
  10. ^ "Tercera División (Grupo 6) 1994–95" [Tercera División (Group 6) 1994–95] (in Spanish). Futbolme. Retrieved 17 February 2016. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g "Bordalás: José Bordalás Jiménez". BDFutbol. Retrieved 29 February 2016.  For start and end dates, click on club name.
  12. ^ "Tercera División (Grupo 6) 1996–97" [Tercera División (Group 6) 1996–97] (in Spanish). Futbolme. Retrieved 17 February 2016. 
  13. ^ "Bordalás: José Bordalás Jiménez". BDFutbol. Retrieved 17 July 2016.  For start and end dates, click on club name.


External links[edit]