Washington Nationals minor league players

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Minor league players and teams affiliated with the Washington Nationals professional baseball organization include:

Players[edit]

Osvaldo Abreu[edit]

Osvaldo Abreu
Washington Nationals
Shortstop
Born: (1994-06-13) June 13, 1994 (age 24)
La Romana, Dominican Republic
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Osvaldo Manuel Abreu (born June 13, 1994) is a Dominican professional baseball shortstop in the Washington Nationals organization.

Originally signed as an international amateur free agent out of the Dominican Republic by the Nationals in 2012, Abreu spent the 2012 season with the Dominican Summer League Nationals, 2013 with the Gulf Coast League Nationals, 2014 with the Auburn Doubledays, 2015 with the Hagerstown Suns,[1] 2016 with the Potomac Nationals,[2] and 2017 with the Harrisburg Senators. His Senators tenure got off to a rough start as he was struck in the face by the bat of teammate Austen Williams in a batting practice accident on Opening Day 2017, but he avoided serious injury.[3] He was left unprotected from the Rule 5 draft after the 2017 season but was not claimed by any team.[4] The Nationals invited him to 2018 major league spring training, his first time as a participant.[5]

Abreu was an organizational All-Star with the Nationals in 2015 and has ranked among the organization's top infield prospects,[6] although some analysts downgraded his outlook after a down offensive season in the Class-AA Eastern League in 2017.[7][8] Used as both a shortstop and second baseman at High-A Potomac in 2015, he began exclusively playing shortstop in 2016.[9]

Yasel Antuna[edit]

Yasel Antuna
Washington Nationals
Shortstop / Third baseman
Born: (1999-10-26) October 26, 1999 (age 18)
Peravia, Dominican Republic
Bats: Switch Throws: Right

Yasel Eneudy Antuna (born October 26, 1999) is a Dominican professional baseball infielder in the Washington Nationals organization.

The Nationals signed Antuna to a minor league contract as an amateur free agent out of the Dominican Republic on July 2, 2016. They gave Antuna a $3.9 million signing bonus, the largest they had ever awarded an international free agent by $2.4 million to that point.[10] Antuna was described by scouts at the time as a potential five-tool player who profiled as a future everyday shortstop in the major leagues.[11]

Antuna debuted professionally in the Gulf Coast League with the GCL Nationals in 2017, appearing in games at shortstop and third base. He played in both games of a double-header on July 23, 2017, in which the GCL Nationals no-hit the GCL Marlins in both seven-inning games, committing a throwing error in the second game that accounted for one of the Marlins' two baserunners in the contest.[12] Midseason rankings that month by MLB Pipeline ranked Antuna as the Nationals' eighth-best prospect.[13] Antuna finished his 2017 season with a .301 batting average in the Gulf Coast League, playing mostly shortstop with several appearances at third base as well.[14]

Nick Banks[edit]

Nick Banks
Washington Nationals
Outfielder
Born: (1994-11-18) November 18, 1994 (age 23)
Charlotte, North Carolina
Bats: Left Throws: Left

Nicholas Matthew Banks (born November 18, 1994) is an American professional baseball outfielder for the Washington Nationals organization

Banks formerly lived in Charlotte, North Carolina, but moved to Tomball, Texas when he was eleven,[15] and graduated from Tomball High School in 2013.[16]

Banks played college baseball for the Texas A&M Aggies. He was drafted by the Washington Nationals in the 4th round of the 2016 MLB draft. He signed and began his professional career with the Auburn Doubledays, spending all of 2016 there, posting a .277 batting average with 19 RBIs and eight doubles.[17] He spent 2017 with the Hagerstown Suns and batted .252 with seven home runs and 58 RBIs.[18][19]

Ryan Brinley[edit]

Ryan Brinley
Washington Nationals
Pitcher
Born: (1993-03-09) March 9, 1993 (age 25)
Georgetown, Texas
Bats: Left Throws: Right

Ryan A. Brinley (born April 9, 1993) is an American professional baseball pitcher in the Washington Nationals organization.

Brinley started his collegiate baseball career at Temple College after attending Georgetown High School. He transferred to Sam Houston State University, where he played for the Bearkats, working as their closer in 2014 while also seeing time as a catcher.[20] Brinley was drafted in the 27th round of the 2015 Major League Baseball draft by the Nationals and elected to sign with the team. In the Nationals organization, he rose to the Class-A Hagerstown Suns of the South Atlantic League by the end of his first professional season in 2015 and progressed to the Class-AA Harrisburg Senators of the Eastern League by the end of 2016. He played for the Glendale Desert Dogs in the Arizona Fall League in 2016 and was named to the league's Fall Stars roster.[21] Brinley started his 2017 season with Harrisburg and was mentioned by The Washington Post as among a handful of young pitchers who could potentially be selected from the minor leagues to bolster the Nationals' troubled bullpen.[22] Brinley was named an Eastern League All-Star that season.[23] However, his 2017 campaign came to an early end as he was placed on the disabled list on August 15.

A right-handed pitcher, Brinley's fastball can reach the mid-90s, and he also mixes in a curveball that he developed in his 2016 season.[24]

Gage Canning[edit]

Gage Canning
Washington Nationals
Outfielder
Born: (1997-04-23) April 23, 1997 (age 21)
Ramona, California
Bats: Left Throws: Right

Gage Parker Canning (born April 23, 1997) is an American professional baseball outfielder in the Washington Nationals organization.

Originally from Ramona, California, Canning attended Arizona State University and played for the Sun Devils. Canning was a consistent offensive force in the Sun Devils' lineup, with an SB Nation fan blog describing him in 2018 as "one of the few bright spots around the program amidst the Sun Devils' back-to-back losing seasons". That season, as a junior, Canning led the NCAA in triples with 11.[25] He was drafted by the Nationals in the fifth round of the 2018 Major League Baseball draft and chose to turn pro.[26] He made his professional debut with the Auburn Doubledays of the New York–Penn League, the Nationals' Class A Short Season affiliate; in one of his first games with the Doubledays on June 22, 2018, he came a double shy of hitting for the cycle.[27] In July 2018, he was promoted to the Nationals' Class A Full Season affiliate, the Hagerstown Suns of the South Atlantic League.[28]

As an outfielder, Canning was ranked as the Nationals' thirteenth-best prospect in July 2018 by MLB Pipeline.[29]

Canning stands 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m), and while he bats from the left side, he throws right-handed.[30] After he was drafted by the Nationals, team scouting director Kris Kline compared him to Nationals outfielder Adam Eaton, describing him as a "classic over-achiever" and predicting he will play in the major leagues. Speed is a key part of his game.[31]

Jacob Condra-Bogan[edit]

Jacob Condra-Bogan
Washington Nationals
Relief pitcher
Born: (1994-08-30) August 30, 1994 (age 24)
Duncan, South Carolina
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Jacob N. Condra-Bogan (born August 30, 1994) is an American professional baseball pitcher in the Washington Nationals organization.

After being adopted out of foster care at age 15 by the same family that had previously adopted his biological sister,[32] Condra-Bogan attended Wofford College and Georgia Southern University, where he pitched for the Wofford Terriers and Georgia Southern Eagles respectively. Drafted in the 32nd round of the 2017 Major League Baseball draft by the Toronto Blue Jays, he chose not to sign with Toronto and instead signed a contract to pitch for the Washington Wild Things in the independent Frontier League.[33] After posting a 1.17 ERA over 15 innings with the Wild Things, Condra-Bogan had his rights purchased by the Kansas City Royals shortly before the start of 2018 spring training.[32][33] With the Class-A Lexington Legends, a Kansas City affiliate, Condra-Bogan pitched to a 2.08 ERA over 16 appearances, all of them in relief, before earning a mid-season promotion to the High-A Wilmington Blue Rocks.[34]

On July 22, 2018, Condra-Bogan was traded from Kansas City to the Washington Nationals in exchange for major league outfielder Brian Goodwin.[34]

Condra-Bogan is known for a fastball that has hit 99 miles per hour (159 km/h) in relief outings. Royals assistant general manager J.J. Picollo noted in 2018 that he had the ability to repeat his delivery and the physical strength to consistently throw in the mid- to upper 90s without losing command of the strike zone.[32] The Kansas City Star reported that he continued taking online courses to earn his master's degree from Georgia Southern while playing minor league baseball in the Royals organization.[32]

Aldrem Corredor[edit]

Aldrem Corredor
Washington Nationals
First baseman / Outfielder
Born: (1995-10-27) October 27, 1995 (age 22)
Miranda, Venezuela
Bats: Left Throws: Left

Aldrem Steven Corredor (born October 27, 1995) is a Venezuelan professional baseball first baseman and outfielder in the Washington Nationals organization.

Corredor agreed to a minor league contract with the Nationals in August 2012 as an international free agent out of Venezuela at the age of 16. Signed as an outfielder, he was described by the team as a player capable of handling both left and right field.[35] During his first four seasons in the Nationals farm system, playing rookie ball with the Dominican Summer League Nationals and Gulf Coast League Nationals, Corredor also saw playing time at first base and in center field. During a June 25, 2013, game against the Dominican Summer League Brewers, from the sixth inning onward, Corredor shifted to third base—a very unusual position for a left-handed fielder to play[note 1]—after third baseman Neivy Pilier exited the game due to an injury. He converted his only chance during three innings as a left-handed third baseman, earning an assist and committing no errors.[36] From 2015 onward, Corredor began seeing more playing time at first base than in the outfield.[37]

Baseball America described Corredor as a "big-bodied" player at the time he was signed by the Nationals but noted he was in better shape heading into the 2013 season.[38] While The Washington Post characterized him in 2012 as a "power hitter",[39] Corredor hit just four home runs through his first four years in rookie ball, although since 2015, both his batting average and slugging percentage have trended markedly upward.[40] With the Class-A Hagerstown Suns of the South Atlantic League, he was named an SAL All-Star in 2017 and led the Northern Division in the June 20 All-Star Game by going 2-for-3 with two runs batted in.[41]

Wil Crowe[edit]

Wil Crowe
Washington Nationals
Pitcher
Born: (1994-09-09) September 9, 1994 (age 24)
Sevierville, Tennessee
Bats: Right Throws: Right

William Chandler Crowe (born September 9, 1994) is an American professional baseball pitcher in the Washington Nationals organization.

Crowe was drafted out of Pigeon Forge High School in the 31st round of the 2013 Major League Baseball draft by the Cleveland Indians. He declined to sign, instead attending the University of South Carolina, where he pitched for the South Carolina Gamecocks.

While at South Carolina, in April 2015, Crowe tore the ulnar collateral ligament in his right throwing elbow and underwent Tommy John surgery performed by Dr. James Andrews.[42][43] He spent the next two years rehabbing with fellow Gamecocks pitcher Cody Morris, who described Crowe as "a mentor" to him during the process even though Crowe had his elbow procedure just a month sooner.[44] Crowe made his return to pitching on June 1, 2016, starting the home opener for the Lexington County Blowfish and showing off a sharp slider and a fastball that reached 95 mph.[45] The Indians again selected him in the 2016 MLB draft, using their 21st-round pick on him, but Crowe again did not sign, returning to South Carolina as a redshirt junior.[42]

Crowe led the Gamecocks in strikeouts while posting a 3.41 ERA across 92⅓ innings in 2017 before being drafted with the 65th overall pick by the Nationals in the 2017 MLB Draft, who were known for selecting amateur players who had previously had or needed to undergo Tommy John surgery.[46] Crowe received a $946,500 signing bonus from the Nationals, in line with the slot value of the selection.[47] After Crowe's signing, MLB Prospect Watch ranked him as the Nationals' sixth-best prospect,[13] with Baseball America listing him eighth.[48] Crowe made his professional debut with the GCL Nationals, and after giving up two earned runs in 3.2 innings, was promoted to the Auburn Doubledays, where he finished the season, posting a 2.61 ERA with a 1.02 WHIP in seven games started.[49] Crowe opened his season with the High-A Potomac Nationals in 2018 by winning nine straight decisions,[50] earning a berth in the Carolina League All-Star Game.[51]

Austin Davidson[edit]

Austin Davidson
Washington Nationals
Second baseman / Third baseman
Born: (1993-01-03) January 3, 1993 (age 25)
Oxnard, California
Bats: Left Throws: Right

Austin Daniel Davidson (born January 3, 1993) is an American professional baseball infielder in the Washington Nationals organization.

Davidson attended Oxnard High School in his hometown of Oxnard, California, and went on to play baseball for the Pepperdine Waves at nearby Pepperdine University in Malibu, California. Before turning pro, Davidson played mostly as a third baseman.[52] Both Davidson and Waves teammate Bryan Langlois were drafted by the Nationals in the 2014 Major League Baseball draft, with Davidson being taken in the 13th round. After signing with the team, Davidson was assigned to the Auburn Doubledays in the Class-A Short Season New York–Penn League.[53] In the Nationals system, Davidson was converted to a second baseman,[54] still appearing at times at third base and also making some appearances starting in 2017 as a first baseman. After hitting .319 with the Class-A Advanced Potomac Nationals in the opening weeks of the 2018 season, Davidson was promoted to the Class-AA Harrisburg Senators on April 23, 2018, going 3-for-4 in his debut against the Trenton Thunder that same day.[55]

With his left-handed swing, ability to generate power, and some defensive flexibility around the infield, Davidson has been compared by player development staff to former Nationals infielder Danny Espinosa.[54] Though not ranked as a top prospect for the Nationals at the start of the 2017 or 2018 seasons, Fangraphs contributor and sabermetrician Carson Cistulli selected him as "Cistulli's Guy" in both years, acknowledging him as a lower-ranked but still intriguing prospect and comparing him to better-regarded former Nationals prospect Max Schrock.[56][57]

Brady Dragmire[edit]

Brady Dragmire
Brady Dragmire Dunedin 2015.jpg
Dragmire with the Dunedin Blue Jays in 2015
Washington Nationals
Pitcher
Born: (1993-02-05) February 5, 1993 (age 25)
Sacramento, California
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Brady John Dragmire (born February 5, 1993) is an American professional baseball pitcher in the Washington Nationals organization.

Dragmire attended Bradshaw Christian High School in Sacramento, California,[58] and was drafted by the Blue Jays in the 17th round of the 2011 Major League Baseball draft. He was assigned to the Rookie-level Gulf Coast League Blue Jays and made one appearance for the team that season, allowing three earned runs in one inning.[59] In 2013, Dragmire was promoted to the Rookie-Advanced Bluefield Blue Jays of the Appalachian League, where he amassed a 2.16 ERA while both starting and relieving.[59]

Dragmire continued his progression through the Blue Jays minor league organization in 2014, pitching with the Class-A Lansing Lugnuts exclusively out of the bullpen, and in 2015, when he was promoted to the Advanced-A Dunedin Blue Jays and struggled to a 5.26 ERA.[59] In the offseason, Dragmire pitched in nine games for the Salt River Rafters of the Arizona Fall League, and posted a 0.82 ERA in 11 innings.[59] On November 18, 2015, Dragmire was added to the Blue Jays' 40-man roster, to protect him from the Rule 5 draft.[60] He was assigned to the Double-A New Hampshire Fisher Cats to open the 2016 minor league season.[61]

On September 27, 2016, Dragmire was designated for assignment to make room on Toronto's 40-man roster for Chris Smith,[62] beginning a whirlwind offseason for the pitcher that saw him traded for cash considerations to the Pittsburgh Pirates and then bounced between Pittsburgh and the Texas Rangers on waiver claims multiple times, ultimately being designated for assignment five times from late September through January. He finally cleared waivers in the Rangers organization and was outrighted from the 40-man roster on January 27, assigned to the Class-AAA Round Rock Express.[63] After starting the season with the Express, Dragmire was released on June 16, 2017. He was signed by the Washington Nationals and assigned to the Class-AA Harrisburg Senators.[64] He pitched both in relief and as a starter for the Senators, racking up a 3.13 ERA for the season despite an equal number of strikeouts and walks, 21 apiece.[65]

Dragmire received an invitation to major league spring training in advance of the Nationals' 2018 season,[66] coincidentally joining Smith, for whom the Blue Jays had designated him for assignment in 2016, among Washington's non-roster invitees for the spring.[65] He did not make the team, returning to Class-AA Harrisburg as a full member of the rotation.[67] On April 28, 2018, he carried a perfect-game bid into the sixth inning and ended up pitching eight shutout, one-hit innings against the Altoona Curve.[68] He was promoted to the Class-AAA Syracuse Chiefs as a starter in June 2018.[69]

Kameron Esthay[edit]

Kameron Esthay
Washington Nationals
Outfielder
Born: (1994-12-05) December 5, 1994 (age 23)
Lake Charles, Louisiana
Bats: Left Throws: Left

Kameron Esthay (born December 5, 1994) is an American professional baseball outfielder in the Washington Nationals organization.

A graduate of Sam Houston High School near his hometown of Lake Charles, Louisiana,[70] Esthay attended Baylor University and played outfielder for the Bears. In his junior year, the Nationals drafted him in the 26th round of the 2017 Major League Baseball draft.[71] Esthay chose to forgo his senior year at Baylor and go professional, signing with the Nationals.[70] While principally used as an outfielder in his first professional season in the Nationals organization, Esthay took over as first baseman in an August 18, 2017, game with the Class A Short Season Auburn Doubledays after an ejection.[72] On September 5, 2017, Esthay came a triple shy of hitting for the cycle with Auburn.[73] Among qualifying players, he led the Doubledays in 2017 with a .273 batting average and 30 runs batted in.

Luis García[edit]

Luis García
Washington Nationals
Second baseman / Shortstop
Born: (2000-05-17) May 17, 2000 (age 18)
New York City, New York
Bats: Left Throws: Right

Luis Victoriano García (born May 16, 2000) is an American professional baseball infielder of Dominican descent in the Washington Nationals organization.

García's father, Luis Rafael García, was a Dominican-born shortstop who briefly reached the major leagues with the Detroit Tigers during their 1999 season. The younger García was born in New York City, but moved to the Dominican Republic at the age of 3. At the age of 16, he signed a contract with the Nationals on July 2, 2016, as an international free agent out of the Dominican Republic.[74] He accepted a $1.3 million signing bonus, the second-most the Nationals awarded an international player in the 2016 class behind fellow Dominican shortstop Yasel Antuna.[75]

Baseball America ranked García as the Nationals' seventh-best prospect before the 2017 season.[76] García made his professional debut in 2017 with the Gulf Coast League Nationals, appearing as both a second baseman and shortstop during the season and often forming the GCL Nationals' double-play tandem with Antuna.[77] Both players put up batting averages slightly above .300, with García's the better of the two at .302, during their 2017 campaigns.[14] García advanced quickly in the 2018 season, earning a midseason promotion from the Class-A Hagerstown Suns to the High-A Potomac Nationals, and he was the youngest player and the first ever born in the 2000s selected to the All-Star Futures Game in 2018, playing for Team World against fellow Nationals infield prospect Carter Kieboom and Team USA.[78]

Taylor Gushue[edit]

Taylor Gushue
Washington Nationals
Catcher
Born: (1993-12-19) December 19, 1993 (age 24)
Boca Raton, Florida
Bats: Switch Throws: Right

Taylor Stone Gushue (born December 19, 1993) is an American professional baseball catcher in the Washington Nationals organization.

A fourth-round pick of the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 2014 Major League Baseball draft, Gushue signed for a $388,800 bonus. Though drafted as a catcher, Gushue also played first base at the University of Florida.[79] After signing, he was assigned to the Jamestown Jammers where he batted .241 with five home runs and 29 RBIs. He spent 2015 with the West Virginia Power, batting .231 with five home runs and 47 RBIs in 99 games, and 2016 with the Bradenton Marauders, where he posted a .226 batting average with eight home runs and 38 RBIs.

Gushue was traded to the Washington Nationals on September 26, 2016, for infielder Chris Bostick.[80]

While not considered a remarkable hitter in the Pirates organization, Gushue demonstrated an immediate power surge in the Nationals organization, where he started 2017 with the Potomac Nationals.[81][82] He was named a Carolina League All-Star, alongside teammates Víctor Robles and Kelvin Gutierrez.[83] Midseason prospect rankings produced by MLB Pipeline saw Gushue vault into the Nationals' top 30 prospects, ranking as their third-best catching prospect behind Raudy Read and Pedro Severino and coming in at 25th overall among Washington prospects.[13] Gushue led the Potomac Nationals in home runs with 18 on the season along with slashing .241/.327/.437 with 67 RBIs.[14] He finished the season with the Harrisburg Senators, playing four games with them.[84] He went on to play for the Mesa Solar Sox in the Arizona Fall League after the season.[85]

Gushue was invited to participate in 2018 spring training with the Nationals.[86]

Andrew Istler[edit]

Andrew Istler
Washington Nationals
Relief pitcher
Born: (1992-09-18) September 18, 1992 (age 26)
Toledo, Ohio
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Andrew James Istler (born September 18, 1992) is an American professional baseball pitcher in the Washington Nationals organization.

A native of Toledo, Ohio, Istler pitched and played outfield for the Blue Devils at Duke University. The Los Angeles Dodgers drafted him in the 23rd round of the 2015 Major League Baseball draft as a pitcher, and he chose to sign with the organization. Despite a difficult first professional season with the Ogden Raptors of the Pioneer League, in which he posted an 8.38 ERA over 29 innings, Istler was selected to participate in the Dodgers' "DriveLine" conditioning program, where he used a weighted ball and increased his fastball velocity from the high-80s mph range up to the mid-90s.[87] Istler participated in major league spring training camp in 2017[88] and again in 2018.[89] After posting a 2.37 ERA across 79⅓ innings between the Class-A Advanced Rancho Cucamonga Quakes, the Class-AA Tulsa Drillers, and the Class-AAA Oklahoma City Dodgers, Istler was traded to the Washington Nationals on August 31, 2018, for major league pitcher Ryan Madson.[90]

Istler stands 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m), on the short side for a professional baseball pitcher, but compensates for his lack of stature with an overhand delivery. He throws a fastball and curveball.[91]

Daniel Johnson[edit]

Daniel Johnson Jr.
Washington Nationals
Outfielder
Born: (1995-07-11) July 11, 1995 (age 23)
Vallejo, California
Bats: Left Throws: Left

Daniel Johnson Jr. (born July 11, 1995) is an American professional baseball outfielder in the Washington Nationals organization.

Drafted out of New Mexico State University in the fifth round of the 2016 Major League Baseball draft by the Nationals, Johnson was a star center fielder for the Aggies, demonstrating great speed, a strong arm, and the ability to hit for both average and power in his time in collegiate baseball.[92] In his first professional season, Johnson hit .265 with a home run and 14 RBIs over 62 games for the Auburn Doubledays. The Nationals reportedly believed in Johnson's potential not just to stick in center field at higher professional levels, but to produce double-digit home runs as he developed.[93]

Johnson was assigned to the Hagerstown Suns, a step above Auburn in the Nationals' farm system, for the 2017 season.[93] Almost right away, Johnson demonstrated significantly greater power and hitting ability with the Suns, hitting 10 home runs by the end of May and posting a batting average above .300.[94] Johnson's prowess earned him a spot on the South Atlantic League's Northern Division All-Star team, alongside teammates like Carter Kieboom, the Nationals' top draft pick in 2016.[95] On July 24, 2017, he was promoted to the Advanced-A Potomac Nationals of the Carolina League.[96] A midseason ranking of prospects by MLB Pipeline that month placed Johnson as the Nationals' tenth-best prospect.[13] Johnson finished the 2017 season with a .298 batting average, 22 home runs, and 22 stolen bases across both levels, appearing in 130 total games.[14] He was named the Nationals' Minor League Player of the Year for 2017.[97]

Gabe Klobosits[edit]

Gabe Klobosits
Washington Nationals
Pitcher
Born: (1995-05-16) May 16, 1995 (age 23)
Katy, Texas
Bats: Left Throws: Right

Gabriel Michael Klobosits (born May 16, 1995) is an American professional baseball pitcher in the Washington Nationals organization.

Klobosits, a native of Katy, Texas, pitched for Pope John XXIII High School and went on to play for the Galveston College Whitecaps. In 2016, he moved to Auburn University and pitched for the Auburn Tigers.[98] In 2017, Klobosits missed the cut for the Tigers' rotation and pitched mostly in long relief.[99] He was drafted by the Nationals in the 36th round of the 2017 Major League Baseball draft[100] and chose to sign with the organization.

After signing, Klobosits began his professional career with the GCL Nationals. He was promoted to the Auburn Doubledays in July and then to the Hagerstown Suns in August.[101] In 30.2 relief innings pitched between the three clubs, he was 1-0 with a 1.47 ERA and 1.01 WHIP.[102]

With an imposing physical profile at 6 ft 7 in (2 m) and 270 pounds (120 kg),[101] Klobosits was described in 2017 by Baseball America's Carlos Collazo as having "excellent plane" and a potent mid-90s fastball.[103] He was one of several pitching prospects the Nationals brought up for a simulated game to prepare their major league hitters for the 2017 National League Division Series.[104] Klobosits underwent Tommy John surgery in May 2018 after posting eleven appearances out of the bullpen for the Potomac Nationals.[105]

A preseason prospect ranking by MLB Pipeline in 2018 listed Klobosits as the Nationals' eighteenth-best prospect, citing his "ability to dominate hitters with his blend of size, stuff and deception".[106]

Gilbert Lara[edit]

Gilbert Lara
Washington Nationals
Shortstop
Born: (1997-10-30) October 30, 1997 (age 20)
Baní, Peravia Province, Dominican Republic
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Gilbert Lara Peguero (born October 30, 1997) is a Dominican professional baseball shortstop in the Washington Nationals organization.

The Milwaukee Brewers signed Lara for a $3.1 million signing bonus.[107][108] Lara made his professional debut with the Arizona Brewers of the Rookie-level Arizona League in 2015,[109] and he was promoted to the Helena Brewers in August. Lara ended 2015 with a .240 batting average, with one home run and 30 RBIs in 63 games. Lara returned to Helena for the whole 2016 season where he batted .250 with two home runs and 28 RBIs. In 2017, Lara played for the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers where he posted a .193 average, three home runs and 22 RBIs.[110]

Lara was acquired by the Washington Nationals on August 31, 2018, along with catcher and first baseman KJ Harrison, his Timber Rattles teammate, for starter Gio Gonzalez.[111]

José Marmolejos[edit]

José Marmolejos
Washington Nationals
First baseman / Left fielder
Born: (1993-01-02) January 2, 1993 (age 25)
Dominican Republic
Bats: Left Throws: Left

José Ramon Marmolejos (born January 2, 1993), sometimes referred to as José Marmolejos-Diaz, is a Dominican professional baseball first baseman in the Washington Nationals organization.

Marmolejos signed with the Washington Nationals as an international free agent in June 2011.[112] After hitting .310 over 124 games with 11 home runs for the Class-A Hagerstown Suns of the South Atlantic League in 2015, Marmolejos was named the Nationals' Minor League Player of the Year.[113] He repeated in 2016, earning organizational Minor League Player of the Year honors with a combined .289 batting average and 13 home runs with the High-A Potomac Nationals and the Class-AA Harrisburg Senators.[114]

The Nationals added Marmolejos to their 40-man roster after the 2016 season.[115] On February 24, 2017, Marmolejos was placed on the 60-day disabled list with a left forearm strain.[116] While rehabbing, Marmolejos went 5-for-6 with the Harrisburg Senators in a May 22, 2017, game visiting the Erie SeaWolves. He capped off his day by hitting a two-out, go-ahead grand slam in the ninth inning, and the Senators won the ballgame 14–13.[117][118] He was activated from the disabled list and assigned to continue playing for Class-AA Harrisburg on June 1, 2017.[119] He was named to participate in the Eastern League All-Star game in 2017.[120] In total, he hit .288 with 14 home runs in 107 games in Class-AA for the 2017 season.[14] Marmolejos was designated for assignment on July 26, 2018.

Andruw Monasterio[edit]

Andruw Monasterio
Washington Nationals
Second baseman / Shortstop
Born: (1997-05-30) May 30, 1997 (age 21)
Caracas, Venezuela
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Andruw Monasterio (born May 30, 1997) is a Venezuelan professional baseball infielder in the Washington Nationals organization.

In 2014, at age 17, Monasterio tried out for the Chicago Cubs at the organization's Venezuelan academy. The Cubs were impressed and signed him to a contract. Originally a shortstop, Monasterio began seeing regular time as a second baseman starting in the 2016 season with the South Bend Cubs.[121] On August 21, 2018, the Cubs traded Monasterio for Washington Nationals infielder Daniel Murphy and cash considerations.[122] Monasterio was assigned to the Potomac Nationals of the Class-A Advanced Carolina League, contributing key offense to the Potomac lineup within days of joining the Nationals organization.[123]

Baseball scout Adam McInturff of 2080 Baseball described Monasterio in 2018 as a "high-floor prospect" with "above-average" defense, but not much power on offense.[124]

Jake Noll[edit]

Jake Noll
Washington Nationals
Third baseman / Second baseman
Born: (1994-03-08) March 8, 1994 (age 24)
Punta Gorda, Florida
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Jacob Noll (born March 8, 1994) is an American professional baseball infielder in the Washington Nationals organization.

Noll did not receive a Division I baseball scholarship out of high school. He was accepted onto the Eagles baseball team at Florida Gulf Coast University as a walk-on player in 2014.[125] That year, he was named the Louisville Slugger National Freshman of the Year, among other honors.[126] He played for the Lakeshore Chinooks in the collegiate summer baseball Northwoods League in 2014, contributing to their championship drive.[127] In 2016, he was named the Atlantic Sun Conference Player of the Year.[128]

The Nationals selected Noll in the seventh round of the 2016 Major League Baseball draft, making him the fifth-highest draft pick in Florida Gulf Coast history and the second-highest among position players. Many prognosticators had expected him to be drafted a round or two higher.[129] Noll chose to sign with the Nationals[125] and was named among the organization's Minor League Baseball All-Stars at the end of the 2016 season, progressing from the Class A Short Season Auburn Doubledays up to the Class A Full Season Hagerstown Suns over the course of his campaign.[130] Noll continued his development in 2017, ending the year with the Class A-Advanced Potomac Nationals. Noll was one of six Potomac Nationals honored as Carolina League All-Stars in 2018.[51]

Nick Raquet[edit]

Nick Raquet
Washington Nationals
Pitcher
Born: (1995-12-12) December 12, 1995 (age 22)
Boalsburg, Pennsylvania
Bats: Right Throws: Left

Nicholas Robert Raquet (born December 12, 1995) is an American professional baseball pitcher in the Washington Nationals organization.

A Centre County, Pennsylvania, native, Raquet attended State College Area High School and went on to pitch for the Tar Heels at the University of North Carolina in 2015. He transferred to the College of William & Mary for the 2017 spring season, where he struggled to a 4.66 ERA,[131] although he led the Tribe in strikeouts.[132] Despite his high ERA, the Nationals used their third-round selection in the 2017 Major League Baseball draft on Raquet, with CBS Sports opining that the left-hander "has much better stuff than his spring stats would suggest".[133] His drafting by the Nationals made him the third-highest-drafted William & Mary baseball player at the time.[134] Raquet signed with the Nationals on June 20, 2017,[135] and was assigned to the Gulf Coast League Nationals,[136] quickly moving up to the Auburn Doubledays and finishing the season there.[14] In 12 combined starts between the Nationals and the Doubledays, he posted a 3-2 record with a 2.36 ERA and a 1.22 WHIP.[137] In 2018, Raquet progressed through Class-A baseball, earning a June promotion from the Hagerstown Suns to the more advanced Potomac Nationals.[138]

MLB Pipeline ranked Raquet as the Nationals' sixteenth-best prospect before the start of the 2018 season.[106]

At the time he was drafted, Raquet's fastball sat in the low 90s but could touch 96 mph for extended periods. He compliments the fastball with secondary pitches that include a changeup.[133]

Jhon Romero[edit]

Jhon Romero
Washington Nationals
Pitcher
Born: (1995-01-17) January 17, 1995 (age 23)
Cartagena, Colombia
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Jhon Jairo Romero (born January 17, 1995) is a Colombian professional baseball pitcher in the Washington Nationals organization.

As a boy, Romero played catcher, but he began finding success as a pitcher as he matured. Older than most international amateurs when he joined a professional baseball organization, Romero was 20 years old when the Chicago Cubs signed him out of Colombia in 2015 and assigned him to their Dominican Summer League affiliate. At the time, Cubs scout Manuel Esquivia said the organization envisioned him as a possible future closer, as he touched 94 miles per hour (151 km/h) in his tryout with the Chicago organization.[139]

After spending two seasons in the Dominican Summer League, Romero was assigned to the Cubs' stateside affiliates in the 2017 season and shot through the low minors, rising from the Arizona League Cubs to the short-season Eugene Emeralds of the Northwest League before finishing out the season with the South Bend Cubs of the Midwest League. He led Cubs relief prospects with a 0.86 ERA[140] and led all minor league pitchers who pitched at least 25 innings with a 0.62 WHIP that year, across the three levels.[141]

Promoted to the Myrtle Beach Pelicans in the Advanced-A Carolina League to begin the 2018 season, Romero posted a 3.27 ERA and 1.30 WHIP over 32 appearances through July.[142] Hours before the Major League Baseball trade deadline on July 31, 2018, the Cubs traded Romero to the Washington Nationals for Brandon Kintzler.[143]

Karlo Seijas[edit]

Karlo Seijas
Washington Nationals
Pitcher
Born: (2000-09-06) September 6, 2000 (age 18)
La Victoria, Venezuela
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Karlo Domingo Seijas (born September 6, 2000) is a Venezuelan professional baseball pitcher in the Washington Nationals organization.

Ranked #48 on Baseball America's list of amateur international free agents for the 2017 signing period, Seijas was signed by the Nationals with a $300,000 bonus on July 2, 2017.[144] A right-handed pitcher, by the age of 16, Seijas reportedly sat around 92 miles per hour (148 km/h) with his fastball. He drew comparisons from scouts to countrymen Félix Hernández[145] and Carlos Zambrano. He started his baseball career at the AQAgency Academy in Maracay, near his hometown of San Mateo, Aragua, and reportedly began playing baseball at age 3.[146]

Seijas made his professional debut for the Dominican Summer League Nationals on June 6, 2018.[147]

Sterling Sharp[edit]

Sterling Sharp
Washington Nationals
Pitcher
Born: (1995-05-30) May 30, 1995 (age 23)
Farmington Hills, Michigan
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Sterling Sharp (born May 30, 1995) is an American professional baseball pitcher in the Washington Nationals organization.

Sharp was originally selected by the Atlanta Braves in the 30th round of the 2013 Major League Baseball draft out of North Farmington High School. He elected not to sign, instead honoring a commitment to Eastern Michigan University.[148] Three years later, Sharp was drafted by the Washington Nationals in the 22nd round of the 2016 Major League Baseball draft and elected to sign.[149] At the time he was drafted by the Nationals, Sharp was playing for the Drury University Panthers after transferring from Eastern Michigan. He was only the second player from Drury to be drafted by a Major League Baseball team at the time of his signing.[150] He made his professional debut with the GCL Nationals, and after posting a 3-0 record with a 3.24 ERA and 1.27 WHIP, was promoted to the Auburn Doubledays, where he made one start to end the season.

Sharp began 2017 with the Hagerstown Suns and was later promoted to the Potomac Nationals. In 24 total games (22 starts) between both teams, he pitched to a 6-11 record, a 3.97 ERA and a 1.33 WHIP in 124⅓ combined innings.[151] He was also called upon by the major league club toward the end of the year to pitch to hitters rehabbing from injury or preparing for the 2017 National League Division Series.[152] In 2018, Sharp returned to the Potomac Nationals and was named a Carolina League All-Star.[51] He was promoted to the Class-AA Harrisburg Senators for the first time in June 2018. He also cracked MLB Pipeline's list of top Nationals prospects, being ranked as the organization's fourteenth-best prospect the following month, the Nationals' fastest riser on the list.[153]

Sharp pitches right-handed.[149][154] In 2017, after studying footage of Blake Treinen, Zach Britton, and others, he developed a sinker that had become his primary pitch by the 2018 season, largely supplanting his low-90s fastball in his arsenal.[155] In addition to his sinker and straight fastball, Sharp also throws an above-average changeup[149] and a slider.[156]

In the media, Sharp has drawn some attention for the similarity of his name to retired National Football League wide receiver Sterling Sharpe.[149]

Rodney Theophile[edit]

Rodney Theophile
Washington Nationals
Pitcher
Born: (1999-09-16) September 16, 1999 (age 19)
Pearl Lagoon, Nicaragua
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Rodney Darien Theophile Cuthbert (born September 16, 1999) is a Nicaraguan professional baseball pitcher in the Washington Nationals organization.

Theophile grew up on the Mosquito Coast of Nicaragua, in the town of Pearl Lagoon.[157] He began playing baseball at age 12. Originally a first baseman, Theophile was discovered by professional baseball scout Alex Mongrío, who recognized his potential as a pitcher.[158] In 2015, Theophile traveled to the Dominican Republic to train at the MVP Rivera Sport Academy. He participated in an international showcase for Major League Baseball organizations in early 2016 in the Dominican Republic—the only Nicaraguan prospect at that showcase, El Nuevo Diario reported at the time.[159] While training in the Dominican Republic, Theophile sharpened his curveball and improved the velocity of his fastball to top out above 90 miles per hour (140 km/h).[157][158]

The San Francisco Giants expressed interest in Theophile, reportedly signing him as an international amateur free agent in 2017, shortly after Theophile's 18th birthday.[157] However, the deal was never finalized and ultimately fell through.[160] Theophile, an admirer of Washington Nationals pitcher Max Scherzer, subsequently signed with Washington for a $20,000 bonus.[158] He made his professional debut with the Nationals' Gulf Coast League affiliate in July 2018.

At the time he signed with the Nationals, Theophile was listed at 6 feet 5 inches (1.96 m) and topped out at a reported 94 miles per hour (151 km/h) on his fastball, with a Nationals scout telling La Prensa he expected Theophile to further increase his velocity during the course of his development.[158]

Theophile is a cousin of Kansas City Royals infielder Cheslor Cuthbert on his mother's side.[161] His parents separated when he was 8 years old. His father instilled in him an interest in baseball, taking him to games when he was a boy, while his mother, a former member of the Nicaragua women's national basketball team, preferred that he take up basketball instead.[161] At age 39, Theophile's father died of a heart attack in September 2016 while Theophile was abroad for training in Panama and the Dominican Republic,[161] an event that affected Theophile deeply.[158]

Trey Turner[edit]

Trey Turner
Washington Nationals
Pitcher
Born: (1996-06-15) June 15, 1996 (age 22)
Fort Scott, Kansas
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Trey Eugene Daniel Turner (born June 15, 1996) is an American professional baseball pitcher in the Washington Nationals organization. He was drafted in the 10th round of the 2017 Major League Baseball draft by the Nationals.[162]

Turner was a two-way player at Neosho High School, seeing time as an outfielder as well as a catcher while also pitching.[163] He went on to attend Crowder College, where he was a position player for the Crowder Roughriders, before attending Missouri State University.[164] He primarily worked out of the bullpen as a right-handed relief pitcher for the Missouri State Bears, racking up 22 strikeouts in 13⅓ innings with a 2.03 ERA and a 2–0 record in his junior year[165] before an injury ended his season in April 2017. Turner underwent Tommy John surgery on his right elbow.[166] The Nationals, who drafted him in June, were known for their tendency to draft pitchers who needed to have or had already undergone Tommy John surgery, including 2012 draft first-round pick Lucas Giolito[167] and 2016 draft third-round pick Jesus Luzardo,[168] and the team's scouting director told The Washington Post that the organization would "rehab him the right way".[166] He returned to action for the 2018 season, making his professional debut with the Auburn Doubledays on June 16, one day after his 22nd birthday.[169]

Upon being drafted by the Nationals, Turner also attracted some tongue-in-cheek media attention due to the similarity of his name to Nationals shortstop Trea Turner, who finished second in the voting for 2016 National League Rookie of the Year. Both Turners pronounce their name the same way, with the only difference being in the spelling of the first name.[170]

Phillips Valdez[edit]

Phillips Valdez
Washington Nationals
Pitcher
Born: (1991-11-16) November 16, 1991 (age 26)
San Pedro de Macorís, Dominican Republic
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Phillips Valdez (born November 16, 1992) is a Dominican professional baseball pitcher in the Washington Nationals organization.

Valdez was signed out of the Dominican Republic by the Cleveland Indians in 2009 as an amateur free agent. After playing in the Dominican Summer League for the Indians in 2009 and 2010, he was released. After a brief stint in the Tampa Bay Rays organization, Valdez was signed by the Nationals in 2012 and worked his way up to the Class A Hagerstown Suns by 2014.[171] Valdez pitched for the High-A Potomac Nationals in 2015, advanced to the Double-A Harrisburg Senators in 2016,[172] and finished the 2017 season with the Triple-A Syracuse Chiefs.[173]

Valdez's fastball sits in the 93-95 mph range. He complements it with a changeup and a breaking ball that Potomac Nationals manager Tripp Keister described in 2016 as "slurvy" and improving.[172]

Jacob Wilson[edit]

Jacob Wilson
Washington Nationals
Infielder / Outfielder
Born: (1990-11-14) November 14, 1990 (age 27)
Bartlett, Tennessee
Bats: Right Throws: Right

Jacob Clinton Wilson (born November 14, 1990) is an American professional baseball utility player in the Washington Nationals organization.

Wilson played college baseball at the University of Memphis for the Tigers from 2009 to 2012. As a senior, he was the Conference USA Player of the Year after hitting .320 with 17 home runs and a 1.009 OPS.[174][175]

Wilson was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 10th round of the 2012 Major League Baseball Draft.[176] He signed with the Cardinals and made his professional debut with the Batavia Muckdogs. In 2013, he played for the Peoria Chiefs and Palm Beach Cardinals.[177] He started 2014 with Springfield and was then promoted to the Double-A Springfield Cardinals.[178] His season came to an end after 66 games due to a knee injury.[179] During the 2016 season, he split time between the Memphis Redbirds and the Springfield Cardinals. He finished the 2016 season batting .223 with 14 home runs.[180] Wilson spent 2017 with the Springfield Cardinals, posting a .248 batting average with 17 home runs and 66 RBIs.

The Washington Nationals selected Wilson with one of their two picks in the minor league Rule 5 draft in December 2017.[181] Wilson retooled his swing over the off-season and emerged as a more successful hitter in 2018, quickly progressing in the Nationals organization from the Class-AA Harrisburg Senators to the Class-AAA Syracuse Chiefs while playing multiple infield and outfield positions. With a batting average above the .300 mark near the International League season's midway point, Wilson was named to represent the Chiefs in the 2018 Triple-A All-Star Game.[182]

Team rosters, by league[edit]

Below are the rosters of the minor league affiliates of the Washington Nationals:

Triple-A[edit]

Fresno Grizzlies roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders


Manager

Coaches

60-day disabled list

Injury icon 2.svg 7-day disabled list
* On Washington Nationals 40-man roster
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporary inactive list
Roster updated September 6, 2018
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • Pacific Coast League
Washington Nationals minor league players

Double-A[edit]

Harrisburg Senators roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders


Manager

Coaches


Injury icon 2.svg 7-day disabled list
* On Washington Nationals 40-man roster
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporary inactive list
Roster updated June 29, 2018
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • Eastern League
Washington Nationals minor league players

Class A-Advanced[edit]

Potomac Nationals roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

  • 18 Joan Baez
  • -- A.J. Bogucki
  • 28 Grant Borne Injury icon 2.svg
  • 38 James Bourque
  • 40 Ben Braymer
  • 24 Wil Crowe Injury icon 2.svg
  • 17 Matthew Crownover
  • 35 Matthew DeRosier
  • 31 Steven Fuentes
  • 21 Taylor Guilbeau
  • 34 Hayden Howard
  • -- José Jiménez
  • 44 Gabe Klobosits Injury icon 2.svg
  • 30 Jeremy McKinney
  • 39 Jordan Mills
  • 45 Jorge Pantoja
  • 30 Tommy Peterson Injury icon 2.svg
  • 22 Nick Raquet

Catchers

  • 33 Tres Barrera
  • 12 Jakson Reetz

Infielders

  •  6 Brandon Boggetto
  • 29 Aldrem Corredor
  • -- Grant DeBruin ‡
  • 10 Edwin Lora
  •  8 David Masters
  •  2 Bryan Mejia
  •  1 Ian Sagdal

Outfielders


Manager

  •  7 Tripp Keister

Coaches


Injury icon 2.svg 7-day disabled list
* On Washington Nationals 40-man roster
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporary inactive list
Roster updated June 27, 2018
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • Carolina League
Washington Nationals minor league players

Class A[edit]

Hagerstown Suns roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

  • 19 Carlos Acevedo
  • 11 Tomas Alastre
  • 28 Frankie Bartow
  • 33 Jared Brasher
  • 43 Sam Held
  • 15 Brigham Hill
  • -- Jacob Howell Injury icon 2.svg
  • 20 Jared Johnson
  • 21 Kyle Johnston
  • 44 Andrew Lee
  • 26 Phil Morse
  • 48 Carlos Peña
  • 40 Seth Romero
  • 35 Jackson Tetreault
  • -- Rodney Theophile
  • 31 Alex Troop

Catchers

  • 15 Jeyner Baez Injury icon 2.svg
  • 37 Alex Dunlap
  • 47 Alejandro Flores
  • 27 Joey Harris Injury icon 2.svg
  • 29 Adderling Ruiz Injury icon 2.svg

Infielders

  •  5 Yasel Antuna
  • 13 Anderson Franco
  •  8 Cole Freeman
  •  7 Luis Garcia
  •  2 Omar Meregildo
  •  6 Paul Panaccione
  • 16 Jake Scudder

Outfielders


Manager

  • 22 Patrick Anderson

Coaches


Injury icon 2.svg 7-day disabled list
* On Washington Nationals 40-man roster
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporary inactive list
Roster updated June 29, 2018
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • South Atlantic League
Washington Nationals minor league players

Short A[edit]

Auburn Doubledays roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

  • 30 Aaron Barrett
  • 25 Tim Cate
  • 10 Gilberto Chu
  • 45 Jose De Los Santos
  • -- Tanner Driskill
  • -- Aaron Fletcher
  • 23 Nelson Galindez
  • 32 Jhonatan German
  • 44 Angel Guillen
  • -- Andrew Karp
  • -- Chase McDowell ‡
  • 38 Francys Peguero
  • 24 Malvin Pena
  • 12 Nector Ramirez
  • 13 Yonathan Ramirez
  • 21 David Smith
  • 22 Jackson Stoeckinger
  • -- Michael Sylvestri ‡
  • 36 Ryan Tapani
  • 37 Connor Zwetsch

Catchers

  •  8 Adalberto Carrillo
  • 43 Nic Perkins
  • 20 Israel Pineda

Infielders

  • 26 Jamori Blash
  •  1 Phil Caulfield
  •  7 Cole Daily
  • -- Kyle Marinconz
  • 27 Jason Martinson
  •  6 Juan Pascal
  •  9 Jose Sanchez

Outfielders

  • 14 Gage Canning
  • 17 Ricardo Mendez
  • 16 Jonathan Pryor
  • 18 Jacob Rhinesmith
  • 19 Cody Wilson


Manager

Coaches

  • -- Franklin Bravo (pitching)
  •  2 Mark Harris (hitting)


Injury icon 2.svg 7-day disabled list
* On Washington Nationals 40-man roster
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporary inactive list
Roster updated June 27, 2018
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • New York–Penn League
Washington Nationals minor league players

Rookie[edit]

Gulf Coast League Nationals roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

  • 53 Sean Adler
  • 60 Jose De Los Santos
  • 59 Nelson Galindez
  • 45 Jhonatan German
  • 68 Darly Infante
  • 65 Jose Jimenez
  • 53 Francys Peguero
  • 45 Jairon Peguero
  • 37 Malvin Pena
  • 48 Nector Ramirez
  • 57 Leif Strom
  • 49 Trey Turner
  • 41 Ryan Williamson
  • 64 Connor Zwetsch

Catchers

  • 22 Jose Cabello
  • 32 Adalberto Carrillo
  • -- Anthony Peroni
  • 20 Israel Pineda

Infielders

  • 30 Jamori Blash
  •  3 Phil Caulfield
  •  8 Jose Sanchez

Outfielders

  • 11 Justin Connell
  •  2 Juan Evangelista
  • 17 Santo Falcon
  • 16 Ricardo Mendez
  • 10 Eric Senior
  • 15 Edwin Ventura


Manager

Coaches

  • 29 Jorge Mejia (batting)
  • -- Larry Pardo (pitching)


Injury icon 2.svg 7-day disabled list
* On Washington Nationals 40-man roster
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporary inactive list
Roster updated April 16, 2018
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • Gulf Coast League
Washington Nationals minor league players

Foreign Rookie[edit]

Dominican Summer League Nationals roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

  • 24 Thony Amoroso
  • 34 Bryan Caceres
  • 44 Yimy Carty
  • 31 Manuel De La Rosa
  • 48 Jose A. Ferrer
  • 39 Pedro Gonzalez
  • 58 Charls Jameson
  • 21 Adrian Martinez
  • 30 Yohanse Morel
  • 49 Osvaldo Oquel
  • 52 Bryan Pena
  • 40 Eric Pena
  • 55 Miguel Pozco
  • 43 Jose Rodriguez
  • 36 Carlos Romero
  • 38 Karlo Seijas
  • 37 Wilson Severino
  • 50 Alejandro Vallejo
  • 46 Eddy Yean

Catchers

  •  4 Geraldi Diaz
  • 27 Ivan Murzi

Infielders

  • 18 Daniel Hernandez
  • 13 Addiel Matias
  •  3 Wilfrido Matos
  • 22 Viandel Pena
  • 11 Guillermo Tatis

Outfielders

  • 25 Andry Arias
  • 32 Christopher De La Cruz
  • 10 Leandro Emiliani
  •  2 Braian Fernandez
  • 14 Tristan Hansack
  • 15 Jorge Hurtado
  • 23 Diony Joseph
  • 16 Edangel Tovar


Manager

Coaches

  • 11 Emmiliano Alcantara (coach)
  • 45 Pablo Frias (pitching)
  •  4 Freddy Guzmán (hitting)
  • 51 Javier Guzman (infield)
  • 39 Michael Moscat (assistant pitching)


Injury icon 2.svg 7-day disabled list
* On Washington Nationals 40-man roster
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporary inactive list
Roster updated June 3, 2018
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • Dominican Summer League
Washington Nationals minor league players

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The most recent left-handed third baseman in a Major League Baseball game, as of Corredor's brief appearance at the position, was Mario Valdez of the Chicago White Sox for one inning on July 2, 1997. He had no defensive chances in the inning. (See "Left-handers playing third base (and catcher, second, and shortstop)," Baseball-Reference.com, April 25, 2011.)

References[edit]

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  33. ^ a b Brennan, Patrick (February 12, 2018). "Royals pick up Indy League arm, sign Jacob Condra-Bogan". Royals Farm Report. Retrieved July 22, 2018. 
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