Jose Parica

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Jose Parica
Jose Parica Smiling.JPG
Born (1949-04-18) 18 April 1949 (age 73)
Manila, Philippines
Sport country Philippines
Nickname"Amang", "The Giant Killer"
Professional1974
Tournament wins
Other titles100

Jose Parica (born April 18, 1949)[1] is a Filipino professional pool player from Manila, nicknamed "Amang" (English: "Father") and "the Giant Killer." As a Filipino Hall of Famer, he pioneered the "Filipino invasion" in the United States in the late 70s, especially in the game of Nine-ball. Also known as "the King" in the Philippines, Parica is considered one of the greatest money players of all time. He became the Billiards Digest Player of the Year in 1997. He scored a perfect match with no mistakes in 9-ball race to 11 format in 1997 at the PBT Legends of Nine-ball.

Career[edit]

In 1976, Parica, hoping to get a better deal for Filipino billiard players, organized the Philippine Pocket Billiards Association and became its first president. The same year he was invited to the All Japan Championship and finished second in the Rotation division to Tetsuro Kakuto. In 1978, he was invited to his first tournament in the United States, the World Straight Pool Championship were he placed 11th. He was the first Filipino to travel to the United States. In 1979, Parica was the Philippine National 3-Cushion, Rotation, and Snooker Champion.

Filipino players Efren Reyes and Rodolfo Luat joined Parica in the mid 1980s in what is now known as the "Filipino invasion". Parica competed under the Professional Billiards Association (PBA) for a few years, but did not win a major U.S. title until 1986, when he won the Clyde Childress Memorial 9-Ball Open, followed up with a victory in the Classic Cup V title.

Parica had won close to one hundred tournaments in the U.S., a dozen in Japan, and several titles in the Philippines. In 1988, Parica participated in the Japanese circuit, winning the All Japan Championship in 9-Ball. That same year in Japan, he won the World Pro 9-Ball Tournament, the largest tournament at the time, beating Efren Reyes 9–3 in the finals. The tournament had 900 players compete, which was a record number of participants in a tournament. Parica earned the first prize of $41.000, the biggest first prize money in a tournament at the time.

In 1994, Parica married his wife Aurora and became less active on the Professional Tour. In 1996, Parica resumed playing full time on the Tour winning four tournaments that year, Beating rival Efren Reyes three times in the finals. In 1997, Parica won five tournaments and was ranked number 1 in the professional tour rankings as well as winning the Camel tour overall bonus of $50K defeating Buddy Hall. He was chosen Player of the Year in 1997 by the Billiards Digest Magazine.

Allegations of crime[edit]

In the early 1990s, Parica attacked a man who he said was troubling his wife. The battered man had a different story, stating that Parica robbed him of his belongings. Parica was imprisoned for one day. After paying fines and testifying in court, Parica won the case and was released.[2]

Hall of Fame[edit]

Many fans and pundits of the game believed that Parica should have been inducted in to the Billiard Congress of America Hall of Fame long before his induction. Due to this Parica played professionally in to his 60s, until he was finally inducted into the Billiard Congress of America Hall of Fame in 2014, at the age of 65.

Career Titles & Achievements[edit]

  • 2014 Billiard Congress of America Hall of Fame
  • 2011 Arizona State One Pocket
  • 2011 Chuck Markulis Memorial One Pocket
  • 2011 Empire State Championship
  • 2010 Jay Swanson Memorial 9-Ball
  • 2009 One Pocket Hall of Fame
  • 2009 National Championship Series 10-Ball
  • 2008 Joss Northeast Tour
  • 2007 Blaze 9-Ball Tour
  • 2008 Southern California 14.1 Tournament
  • 2006 Pechauer Nine-ball West Coast Tour
  • 2004 Joss Northeast Nine-ball Tour[3]
  • 2003 Great Seminole Senior Open[1]
  • 2003 Pechauer Nine-ball West Coast Tour[1]
  • 2003 Derby City Classic One-Pocket[1]
  • 2002 Joss Northeast Nine-ball Tour.[4][5]
  • 2002 Joss Northeast Nine-ball Tour[6]
  • 2002 Derby City Classic Master of the Table[4]
  • 2002 Capital City Classic One-Pocket[4]
  • 2002 Hard Times Summer Jamboree, One-pocket[4]
  • 2001 Joss Northeast Tour (Stop 10)
  • 2001 Derby City Classic Bank Pool[7]
  • 2000 Hard Times Winter Jamboree, 9-Ball[8]
  • 2001 Joss Northeast Tour (Stop 11)
  • 1998 Andy Mercer Memorial 9-Ball
  • 1997 Billiards Digest Player of the Year
  • 1997 Camel Overall Bonus[9]
  • 1997 Camel Boston Open[9]
  • 1997 Camel South Jersey Open[9]
  • 1997 PCA One Pocket Open
  • 1997 PCA Sharky's Challenge[9]
  • 1997 PBT Legends of Nine-ball[9]
  • 1996 PBT Darafeev Pro Nine-ball Classic
  • 1996 PCA Shooter's 9-Ball Open
  • 1996 Lion's Den Tournament
  • 1995 U.S. Open One Pocket Championship
  • 1995 Gomez Challenge 9-Ball
  • 1995 US Bar Table One Pocket Championship
  • 1995 Roanoke One Pocket
  • 1995 On Cue Billiards Tournament
  • 1994 Tommy's Billiards Tournament
  • 1993 South Philly Billiards One Pocket
  • 1993 PBT World Team Billiards (Team Philippines)
  • 1992 Kiss Shot Billiards Tournament
  • 1992 Philippine Nine-ball Championship
  • 1992 Lexington All-Star Nine-ball
  • 1991 Florida State 9-Ball Open
  • 1991 Ohio State 9-Ball Open
  • 1990 Tennessee Bar Table Championship
  • 1990 Florida State 9-Ball Open
  • 1990 Ohio State 9-Ball Open
  • 1990 Jupiter 9-Ball Open
  • 1990 Baxter 9-Ball Tournament
  • 1989 International Open Nine-ball
  • 1989 Philippine Nine-ball Championship
  • 1988 JPPA World Pro 9-Ball Tournament[9]
  • 1988 All Japan Championship Nine-ball
  • 1988 Japan International Open 9-Ball
  • 1988 Gandy Open 9-Ball
  • 1987 Pepsi Cola Open 9-Ball
  • 1986 Great American 9-Ball Open
  • 1986 Classic Cup V 9-Ball
  • 1986 Clyde Childress Memorial 9-Ball Open
  • 1980 Philippine Nine-ball Championship
  • 1980 Taiwan International All-around
  • 1979 Philippine 3-Cusion Championship
  • 1979 Philippine Rotation Championship
  • 1979 Philippine Snooker Championship
  • 1979 Philippine Eight-Ball Championship
  • 1979 All Japan Championship 14.1
  • 1979 Philippines-Japan Team Rotation Competition
  • 1978 Philippines-Japan Team Rotation Competition
  • 1976 President of the Philippine Pocket Billiards Association

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "2003 Player Profiles: Jose 'Amang' Parica" Archived 2007-02-02 at the Wayback Machine, AZBilliards.com, 2003; accessed February 10, 2007
  2. ^ "What About Parica?". Billiards Digest. Retrieved May 2, 2010.
  3. ^ "2004 Player Profiles: Jose 'Amang' Parica" Archived 2007-02-02 at the Wayback Machine, AZBilliards.com, 2004; accessed February 10, 2007
  4. ^ a b c d "2002 Player Profiles: Jose 'Amang' Parica" Archived 2007-02-02 at the Wayback Machine, AZBilliards.com, 2002; accessed February 10, 2007
  5. ^ "2003 Joss Northeast Tour Stop 2, September 21–22, 2002, Break Time Billiards, Salisbury, MD" Archived 2007-02-02 at the Wayback Machine, AZBilliards.com, 2002; accessed February 10, 2007. Event was held in 2002, but was part of the "2003 Tour"; it is listed as a 2003 event for purposes of this article.
  6. ^ "2003 Joss Northeast Tour Stop 4, October 12–13, 2002, Eight Bill Billiard Parlor, Quincy, MA" Archived 2007-02-02 at the Wayback Machine, AZBilliards.com, 2002; accessed February 10, 2007. Event was held in 2002, but was part of the "2003 Tour"; it is listed as a 2003 event for purposes of this article.
  7. ^ "2001 Player Profiles: Jose 'Amang' Parica" Archived 2007-02-02 at the Wayback Machine, AZBilliards.com, 2001; accessed February 10, 2007
  8. ^ "2000 Player Profiles: Jose 'Amang' Parica" Archived 2007-02-02 at the Wayback Machine, AZBilliards.com, 2000; accessed February 10, 2007
  9. ^ a b c d e f "2004 Player Profiles: Jose 'Amang' Parica: Previous Titles" Archived 2007-02-02 at the Wayback Machine, AZBilliards.com, 2004; accessed February 10, 2007; stats originate with Billiards Digest magazine

External links[edit]