Joseph A. McChristian

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Joseph Alexander McChristian (October 12, 1914[1] – May 13, 2005) was a United States Army Brigadier General and the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (J2, MACV) (then commanded by General William Westmoreland) from July 13, 1965 to June 1, 1967.[2]

From August 5, 1968 to his retirement on April 30, 1971, he served, in the rank of Major General, as the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence, Headquarters, Department of the Army. As J2, MACV, he predicted that the North Vietnamese would attack in full force, which they did during the Tet offensive of 1968. His prediction was unpopular because the official policy was that the war was being won by the US and South Vietnamese forces.

McChristian is a member of the Military Intelligence Hall of Fame.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Cullum, George Washington; Edward S. Holden. Biographical register of the officers and graduates of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. 8 (3 ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 1276. 
  2. ^ Major General Joseph A. McChristian, The Role of Military Intelligence 1965-1967 (Vietnam Studies), Department of the Army, Washington DC, 1974 (Library of Congress Catalogue Card number 74-600003)

References[edit]

  • Major General Joseph A. McChristian, The Role of Military Intelligence 1965-1967 (Vietnam Studies), Department of the Army, Washington DC, 1974 (Library of Congress Catalogue Card number 74-600003)
  • Jake Blood, The Tet Effect: Intelligence and the Public Perception of War (Cass Military Studies) Routledge 2005. ISBN 0-415-34997-4