Joseph Caryl

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Joseph Caryl.

Joseph Caryl (November 1602 – 25 February 1673) was an English ejected minister.[1]

Life[edit]

He was born in London, educated at Merchant Taylors' School, and graduated at Exeter College, Oxford, and became preacher at Lincoln's Inn. He frequently preached before the Long Parliament, and was a member of the Westminster Assembly in 1643. By order of the parliament he attended Charles I in Holmby House, and in 1650 he was sent with John Owen to accompany Cromwell to Scotland. In 1662, following the Restoration, he was ejected from his church of St Magnus-the-Martyr near London Bridge. He continued, however, to minister to an Independent congregation in London till his death in March 1673, when John Owen succeeded him.

Works[edit]

His piety and learning are displayed in his commentary on Job (12 vols., 1651–1666; 2nd ed., 2 vols., fol. 1676–1677).

Family[edit]

Joseph Caryl married, and his daughter Elizabeth married the merchant Benjamin Shute; their child John Shute, the lawyer and theologian, was born at Theobalds, Essex. He changed his name, and became John Barrington, 1st Viscount Barrington.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Seaver, P. S. "Caryl, Joseph". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4846.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)

External links[edit]

Attibution