Joseph Dube

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Joseph Dube
Personal information
Full name Joseph Douglas Dube
Born February 15, 1944 (1944-02-15) (age 73)
Altha, Florida, U.S.
Competition record
Strongman
Representing  United States
World's Strongest Man
7th 1979 World's Strongest Man

Joseph Douglas "Joe" Dube (born February 15, 1944 in Altha, Florida) is an American weightlifter, world champion, Olympic Games medalist and strongman competitor. He received a bronze medal at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City.[1][2] As of 2017 he is still the last male American weightlifter to win the World Championships in Olympic weightlifting, accomplishing this feat at the World Championships in 1969 in Warsaw, Poland.[3]

Weightlifting achievements[edit]

  • First teen age weightlifter in the world to clean and press 400 lbs. accomplished Feb. 1964.
  • Gold Medal Pan American Games (1967)
  • Tied for 1st (silver medal due to bodyweight) at the Little Olympics (1967)
  • Tied for 2nd (Bronze medal due to bodyweight) in 1968 Olympics and World Championships (1968)
  • Gold Medal World Weightlifting Championships (1969)
  • America's Cup champion (1980)
  • First American weightlifter to total 1300 lbs. in three Olympic lifts
  • Set twelve American and four world records during career
  • Inducted in Weightlifting Hall of Fame, York, PA

Best official lifts[edit]

  • Press 463 lb (210 kg)
  • Snatch 369 lb (166 kg)
  • Clean & jerk 474 lb (215 kg)
  • Total 1300 lb (591 kg)

Best unofficial lifts[edit]

  • Press 475 lb
  • Snatch 385 lb
  • Clean & jerk 485 lb

Notes of interest[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1968 Summer Olympics – Mexico City, Mexico – Weightlifting". databaseOlympics.com. Archived from the original on September 29, 2008. Retrieved February 22, 2008. 
  2. ^ "Joe Dube". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved December 19, 2008. 
  3. ^ "World Championship – Weightlifting Medalists". HickokSports.com. Retrieved December 19, 2008. [permanent dead link]
  4. ^ "Art of the Olympians – Joe Dube". artoftheolympians.org. Retrieved 2015-12-22.