Joseph I. Johnson

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Joseph Inkerman Johnson
Born 1914
Hulcote, Northamptonshire,
England
Died 30 August 1940 (aged 25 or 26)
Bishopsbourne
Allegiance United Kingdom
Service/branch  Royal Air Force
Years of service 1935–1940
Rank Sergeant
Unit No. 222 Squadron RAF
Battles/wars

World War II

Joseph Inkerman Johnson was born in 1914 in Hulcote, Northamptonshire. He joined the RAF in June 1935 as an Aircrafthand (Carpenter).[1] He was later remustered as an Airman-in training Pilot and won his wings on 11 August 1939 — three weeks before Britain declared war on Germany.

In May 1940 Sgt. Johnson was posted to 222 Squadron. In June he claimed the 'probable' destruction of a He 111 over Dunkirk. By August 1940 he had flown 25 missions. The squadron was posted to RAF Hornchurch on 29 August 1940.[2]

The following day no. 222 Squadron was scrambled several times during the day, and at 16:00 hours to intercept a large formation of bombers in the direction of the Thames Estuary and were attacked by the escorting fighters. Flying a Spitfire Mk 1, R6628 Johnson was shot down at 18:02 by a Messerschmitt Bf109[3] and crashed near Bishopsbourne, south of Canterbury in Kent.[4] It is believed that Johnson died before the crash.

Johnson is buried in Towcester Cemetery in Northamptonshire. His grave is Row G, Grave 2[5] and it gives his service number — 520406.[6] His name is included on the Battle of Britain Memorial at Capel-le-Ferne.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.thesoutheastecho.co.uk/Pilots/Johnson_JI.htm
  2. ^ Battle of Britain Squadrons http://www.raf.mod.uk/bob1940/213to236.html
  3. ^ Battle of Britain Historical Society http://www.battleofbritain1940.net/0031.html
  4. ^ RAF Hornchurch - The Human Story http://www.rafhornchurch.thehumanjourney.net/squadrons.htm#222
  5. ^ Commonwealth War Graves Commission http://www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=2949658
  6. ^ Bishopsbourne Spitfire http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~nog/personal/spitfire.htm Originally published in the Kingston parish magazine based on research conducted at The Battle of Britain Museum, Hawkinge by M Joplin, a local historian