Joseph Keckler

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Joseph Keckler
JosephKeckler-TimHailand.png
Born
OccupationSinger, Writer, Songwriter

Joseph Keckler is an American singer, musician, and writer.[1] In 2016 he was named a "major vocal talent" by the New York Times.[2] Keckler's concerts have been presented at Lincoln Center, Centre Pompidou, SXSW, The Adult Swim Festival, and many other venues. Keckler's voice is unique in the sense that it spans three octaves. [3] In 2017 he released his first book, Dragon at the Edge of a Flat World (Turtle Point Press), a collection of essays and stories. [4]

As a teenager, Keckler set out to become a blues singer. He subsequently trained classically as an operatic bass-baritone and now works in multiple styles.[5]

Keckler's work has included original baroque pop songs,[6] classical and experimental vocalization,[7] videos, and performed stories, dreamlike monologues, and essays.[8]

He has worked in music, comedy, and the art world. In June 2015, Keckler appeared in Dave Malloy's Preludes at the Lincoln Center Theater 3. He portrayed Feodor Chaliapin, a famous opera singer and long time friend to Sergei Rachmaninoff.

References[edit]

  1. ^ McCabe, Bret. Joseph Keckler: A multi-hyphenate finds a singular outlet in performance. Baltimore Citypaper, 2010.
  2. ^ Holden, Stephen (2016-05-27). "Review: Joseph Keckler Shares Operatic Overtones and Tales at Pangea". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-10-28.
  3. ^ "Joseph Keckler’s New Musical Is an Enigmatic Highlight of NYC’s Prototype Festival". Observer. 2019-01-07. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  4. ^ "Joseph Keckler by Olivia Laing - BOMB Magazine". bombmagazine.org. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  5. ^ La Rocco, Claudia. "Interview with Joseph Keckler: From a Tricycle to many vehicles". New York Times, 2013.
  6. ^ Schulte, Tom. "Joseph Keckler on Outsight Radio Hours, 2011.
  7. ^ Luber, Stephen. "A Minotaur Enters, Shirtless, Wearing Tight Black Levis." Obscene Jester, 2014. Archived 2016-10-28 at the Wayback Machine.
  8. ^ Callahan, Dan. "I Was Born and Opera and Society Has Just Got to Deal With That." The L Magazine, 2013.

External links[edit]