Joseph W. Northrop

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I. W. Birdseye House, Bridgeport, 1886.
First Baptist Church, Bridgeport, 1893.
St. John's Episcopal Church, Essex, 1897.

Joseph Walter Northrop (1860–1940) was an American architect.

He practiced in Bridgeport, Connecticut and was prominent in that city in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Northrop was born in New Haven on July 8, 1860. In 1882 he moved to Hartford where he worked for architect George Keller. In 1885 he relocated to Bridgeport to open his own office.[1] He married Mary Alvira (Ogden) Northrop. He had a son, Joseph W. Northrop, Jr. (b. 1886), who would go on to be a prominent architect in Houston, Texas.[2] Northrop died in Bridgeport May 24, 1940.[3]

Architectural Works[edit]

  • Isaac W. Birdseye House, 733 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, CT (1886) - Demolished.[4]
  • Charles G. Downs House, 127 Broad St., Bridgeport, CT (1887) - Demolished.[5]
  • George Comstock House, 239 Park Ave., Bridgeport, CT (1887) - still extant at the corner of Park Ave and Atlantic St.[6]
  • Benjamin F. Squire House, 1601 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, CT (1888–89) - Altered.[7]
  • Edward W. Marsh House, 984 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, CT (1888) - Demolished.[8]
  • Frank Ashley Wilmot, Sr. House (President of American Tube & Stamping Mfg. Co.-formerly Wilmot & Hobbs Mfg. Co.)(1865-1915), 633 Clinton Ave., Bridgeport, CT (1889) 'Stratfield Historic District' 'Number 3 in a series titled "Our Attractive Homes", published weekly in Bridgeport Standard; appeared 31 January 1891.' Currently (2017) used as office of Dr. James Caserta, DDS.
  • Willis F. Hobbs House (President of The Bridgeport Hardware Manufacturing Co.)(1854-1939)(Brother in Law of Frank Ashley Wilmot, Sr.), 55 Sterling Pl., Bridgeport, CT (1891) - Altered.[9]
  • Mary Taylor Memorial M. E. Church, 168 S. Broad St., Milford, CT (1892)[10]
  • Thomas C. Wordin House, 1139 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, CT (1892) - Now home to the local union of the Teamsters.[11]
  • First Baptist Church, 126 Washington Ave., Bridgeport, CT (1893–94)[12]
  • Thomas C. Wordin House, 33 Yale St., Bridgeport, CT (1893) - An investment property. Altered.[13]
  • First Reformed Church, 35 S. Broadway, Yonkers, NY (1894) - Demolished.[14]
  • Taylor Memorial Library, 5 Broad St., Milford, CT (1894) - Now home to the Milford Chamber of Commerce.
  • Colin M. Ingersoll House, 475 Whitney Ave., New Haven, CT (1896) - Described as a "knowledgeable variant of the Chateauesque mansions of Richard Morris Hunt".[15]
  • Lauralton Hall, 200 High St., Milford, CT (1897) - Built as the estate of Charles H. Pond in 1864. Henry A. Taylor had Northrop redesign the entire house. Now a girls' catholic school.[16][17][18]
  • St. John's Episcopal Church, 23 Main St., Essex, CT (1897)[19]
  • Essex Public Library, 3 S. Main St., Essex, CT (1898) - No longer used as the library.[20][21]
  • Edward W. Harral House, 123 Harrison St., Bridgeport, CT (1899) - Demolished. Currently the corner of Golden Hill & Lafayette.[22]
  • St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 20 Fair St., Nantucket, MA (1901–02)[23][24]
  • Second Baptist Church, 774 Kossuth St., Bridgeport, CT (1902)[25]
  • Burroughs Home for Women, 2470 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, CT (1903) - Now the Burroughs Community Center.[26]
  • Remodeling of Bridgeport City Hall, 202 State St., Bridgeport, CT (1905) - No longer the city hall.[27]
  • William R. Webster House, 208 Brooklawn Ave., Bridgeport, CT (1906)[28][29]
  • Maplewood Avenue School Annex, 434 Maplewood Ave., Bridgeport, CT (1908)[30]
  • Richard I. Neithercut House, 180 Brooklawn Ave., Bridgeport, CT (1908)[31][32]
  • George T. Hatheway House, 800 Clinton Ave., Bridgeport, CT (1910)[33]
  • Henry C. Stevenson House, 57 Coleman St., Bridgeport, CT (1912)[34][35]
  • Read School, North Ave. between Garland & Reamer Sts., Bridgeport, CT (1914) - Demolished.[36]
  • Edwin M. Jennings Co. Building, 2 Lafayette Square, Bridgeport, CT (1919) - Altered beyond recognition.[37][38]
  • Stone Bridge, Beardsley Park, Bridgeport, CT (1921) - Connects Bunnell Island to the park mainland.
  • Summerfield M. E. Church, 110 Clermont Ave., Bridgeport, CT (1922)[39]
  • D. M. Read Co. Department Store, 1142 Broad St., Bridgeport, CT (1924–25) - With Monks & Johnson of Boston as engineers.[40]
  • Golden Hill Apartments, 225 Golden Hill St., Bridgeport, CT (1925)[41]
  • Lexington Tower, 369 Lexington Ave., New York, NY (1926)[42]
  • Shelton (Cambridge) Apartments, 2209 Main St., Bridgeport, CT (1931–32)[43]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ransom, David F. Geo. Keller, Architect. 1978.
  2. ^ Encyclopedia of American Biography. 1970
  3. ^ https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/102541726
  4. ^ Sanitary Engineer 4 June 1887: 10.
  5. ^ American Architect and Building News 31 Dec. 1887.
  6. ^ Marina Park Historic District NRHP Nomination. 1982.
  7. ^ Architecture and Building 3 Nov. 1888: 3.
  8. ^ American Architect and Building 27 July 1889.
  9. ^ American Architect and Building News 18 July 1891: 44.
  10. ^ American Architect and Building News 26 March 1892: 206.
  11. ^ American Architect and Buildings 19 Aug. 1893.
  12. ^ "First Baptist Church of Bridgeport (1893)". http://historicbuildingsct.com/. 29 July 2012.
  13. ^ Scientific American Jan. 1894: 2.
  14. ^ Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide 26 May 1894: 846.
  15. ^ Caplan, Colin M. A Guide to Historic New Haven, Connecticut. 2007.
  16. ^ Plumbers Trade Journal, Gas, Steam and Hot Water Fitters' Review 1 Jan. 1898: 18.
  17. ^ Historical Sketches of the Town of Milford. New Haven (CT): Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Co., 1914.
  18. ^ "The Governor Charles H. Pond House (1845)". http://historicbuildingsct.com/. 16 Dec. 2010.
  19. ^ Church Standard 27 Nov. 1897: 132.
  20. ^ "History of the Library". www.youressexlibrary.org.
  21. ^ Architectural Review Jan. 1902: 52.
  22. ^ Engineering Record 22 July 1899: 186.
  23. ^ American Architect and Building News 29 March 1902: 103.
  24. ^ "Parish History". http://www.stpaulschurchnantucket.org/. n.d.
  25. ^ American Architect and Building News 2 Aug. 1901: x.
  26. ^ Connecticut Historical Society Bulletin 1991: 81.
  27. ^ Connecticut Historical Society Bulletin 1991: 81.
  28. ^ International Studio Feb. 1910: 34-36.
  29. ^ Stratfield Historic District NRHP Nomination. 1979.
  30. ^ American Architect 30 Sept. 1908: 17.
  31. ^ International Studio Feb. 1910: 34-36.
  32. ^ Stratfield Historic District NRHP Nomination. 1979.
  33. ^ Paint, Oil and Drug Review Dec. 15 1915: 33.
  34. ^ Domestic Engineering 3 Aug. 1912: 148.
  35. ^ Merchant Plumber and Fitter 1912: 154.
  36. ^ History of Bridgeport. New York: S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1917.
  37. ^ Lumber 7 July 1919: 53.
  38. ^ "An Automobile Sales and Service Building, Bridgeport, Conn." Architecture March 1921: 100.
  39. ^ American Contractor 30 Sept. 1922: 49.
  40. ^ Engineering News-record 1924: 267.
  41. ^ Engineering News-record 1925: 67.
  42. ^ Power 1926: 394.
  43. ^ Engineering News-record 1931: 1229.