Josephine Chu

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Josephine Chu
Chu Hui-liang

MLY
朱惠良
Member of the Legislative Yuan
In office
1 February 1996 – 31 January 2002
Constituency Taipei 2
Personal details
Born (1950-12-16) 16 December 1950 (age 67)
Nationality Taiwanese
Political party New Party
Alma mater Princeton University
Occupation Politician
Profession Museum director

Josephine Chu (Chinese: 朱惠良; born 16 December 1950) is a Taiwanese former politician. She served in the Legislative Yuan from 1996 to 2002. Chu and Hsu Hsin-liang formed an independent ticket in the 2000 presidential election, finishing third.

Early life, education and career[edit]

Chu, born in 1950, is of Mainlander descent.[1] She obtained a doctorate in archeology from Princeton University in the United States, and was a research fellow at the National Palace Museum.[2]

Political career[edit]

Chu served two terms in the Legislative Yuan, winning the 1995 and 1998 elections.[2] Throughout her legislative career, she was occasionally covered in local media as a New Party politician,[3] but most often as an independent.[4][5] Chu and Hsu Hsin-liang formed an independent ticket in the 2000 presidential election, won by Chen Shui-bian and Annette Lu. Chu ran for the Hsinchu district seat in the legislative elections of 2001 with the endorsement of the Gender Sexuality Rights Association, but lost.[6]

Summary of the 18 March 2000 Taiwan presidential election results
Political affiliation Candidate Votes
President Vice President Total votes Percentage
Green Taiwan in White Cross.svg Democratic Progressive Party Chen Shui-bian Vote1.png Annette Lu 4,977,737 39.3%
Independent candidate icon (TW).svg Independent James Soong Chang Chau-hsiung 4,664,932 36.8%
Emblem of the Kuomintang.svg Kuomintang Lien Chan Vincent Siew 2,925,513 23.1%
Independent candidate icon (TW).svg Independent Hsu Hsin-liang Josephine Chu 79,429 0.63%
LogoCNP.svg New Party Li Ao Elmer Fung 16,782 0.13%
Total 12,786,671 82.69% voter turnout
Valid votes 12,664,393
Invalid votes 122,278


Political stances[edit]

Chu has worked to expand LGBT rights in Taiwan,[7][8] and has advocated for rights of foreign spouses.[9]

Chu backed efforts to maintain an unbiased media, as well as cultural outreach initiatives. To this end, she supported a proposal by the Taiwan Media Watch Foundation to have government workers barred from working in the media,[10] and has criticized political interference in the Public Television Service.[11] In 2001, she expressed support for expanding the National Palace Museum to southern Taiwan,[12] a project that was not completed until 2015.

When the United States government announced that it would not ratify the Kyoto Protocol, Chu sought a meeting with the American Institute in Taiwan to argue for the ratification of the treaty.[13] In 2004, she criticized the Chen Shui-bian administration for backing a NT$610.8 billion proposal to acquire American weapons, saying that the results of the Cross-Strait referendum showed that most Taiwanese did not approve of the action.[14]

Later career[edit]

After leaving politics, Chu taught at Taipei National University of the Arts.[15] In 2009, she returned to the National Palace Museum as assistant director of educational outreach,[16] assuming the departmental head position the next year.[17][18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jacobs, J. Bruce (2012). Democratizing Taiwan. Brill Publishers. p. 143. ISBN 9789004221543. 
  2. ^ a b Low, Stephanie (21 November 1999). "Hsu chooses New Party running mate". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  3. ^ Chiu, Yu-Tzu (3 October 2000). "Japan's nuclear activists say `think again'". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  4. ^ Yu, Sen-lun (29 December 1999). "Quake group proposes new legislation to help monitor charitable donations". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  5. ^ Chu, Monique (30 May 2000). "China's protest forces new name for Taiwan art entry". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  6. ^ Chuang, Chi-ting (28 November 2001). "Gay group promotes candidates". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  7. ^ Yu, Sen-lun (15 February 2000). "Hsu's running mate `ties knot' to support gay rights". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  8. ^ "Homosexual rights association opens doors in Kaohsiung". Taipei Times. 25 June 2000. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  9. ^ Low, Stephanie (3 May 2000). "Foreign wives often denied rights". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  10. ^ Yu, Sen-lun (13 February 2000). "Watchdog group". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  11. ^ Huang, Joyce (22 April 2001). "Future of public TV uncertain". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  12. ^ Lin, Mei-chun (21 March 2001). "Debate rages on breadth of nation's cultural gap". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  13. ^ Chiu, Yu-Tzu (3 May 2001). "US urged to rethink Kyoto pact". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  14. ^ Wang, Hsiao-wen (20 September 2004). "Rally opposing new arms bill to be held". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  15. ^ Hong, Caroline (21 June 2004). "Panel criticizes military spending". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  16. ^ "National Palace Museum unveils 'night feast' tour". Taipei Times. 27 April 2009. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  17. ^ Lin, Mei-chun (8 December 2010). "National Palace Museum's procurement budget frozen". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016. 
  18. ^ Bartholomew, Ian (14 April 2010). "Funny enough for words". Taipei Times. Retrieved 30 September 2016.