Josephine Paddock

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Josephine Paddock
Born(1885-04-18)April 18, 1885
Died1964
EducationBarnard College; Art Students League
Known forPainting

Josephine Paddock (April 18, 1885 – 1964) was an American painter born in New York City. She earned a B.A. degree at Barnard College and studied at the Art Students League with Robert Henri, Kenyon Cox, William Merritt Chase, and John Alexander.[1]

Her sister Ethel Louise Paddock was born two years later. She also studied with Henri and would also become a painter and a member of the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors.[2] Both sisters would go on to exhibit at Henri's Exhibition of Independent Artists in 1910, a show that in some ways was a prototype for the Armory Show three years later.

Armory Show of 1913[edit]

Paddock was one of the artists who exhibited at this landmark show. The show included three of her watercolors. These were: Swans on the grass ($50), Swan study-peace ($50), and Swan study-aspiration ($50).[3]

Her work was among forty-eight 19th and 20th Century paintings in the collection of Seymour R. Thaler and Mildred Thaler Cohen which was bequeathed to the Mattatuck Museum, Waterbury, Connecticut, in 2000.

Paddock was a member of the American Watercolor Society, Connecticut Academy of Fine Arts, New Haven Paint & Clay Club, Grand Central Art Gallery, NYC, North Shore Art Association, Gloucester, MA, American Artist Professional League.[4]

The Josephine Paddock Fellowship is the highest award for graduate studies in the arts at Barnard College, Columbia University, in New York City.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Josephine Paddock, 1885-1964". Retrieved 2013-06-14.
  2. ^ Opitz, Glenn B., Mantle Fielding's Dictionary of American Painters, Sculptors & Engravers, Apollo Books, Poughkeepsie, NY, 1988
  3. ^ Brown, Milton W., "The Story of the Armory Show", The Joseph H. Hirshhorn Foundation, 1963, pp. 274–75
  4. ^ "Paddock, Josephine, b. 1885". Archives Directory for the History of Collecting in America, The Frick Collection. Retrieved 2013-06-14.

External links[edit]