Josh Levin

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Josh Levin
Born
Joshua Benjamin Levin

(1980-03-15) March 15, 1980 (age 39)[1]
EducationBrown University
OccupationExecutive editor of Slate magazine
Notable credit(s)
Slate magazine, Hang Up and Listen
Websitehttp://www.josh-levin.com/

Joshua Benjamin Levin (born March 15, 1980) is an American writer and the executive editor at Slate magazine. He also hosts the magazine's sports podcast Hang Up and Listen.

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Levin was born and raised in New Orleans. He attended Brown University, where he earned degrees in computer science and history.[2]

Career[edit]

After graduating from Brown, Levin began his journalism career as an intern at the Washington City Paper in Washington, D.C. He moved to Slate in 2003 where he is currently a senior editor. He edits the magazine's sports and technology sections.[3]

In addition to writing and editing, he also hosts Slate's sports podcast Hang Up and Listen with Stefan Fatsis.[4]

In 2013, for Slate, he wrote an article on Linda Taylor, a woman the Chicago Tribune and Ronald Reagan once termed a "welfare queen."[5][6] The article, which explored Taylor's history of criminal acts, some allegedly neglected by the authorities and more serious than those for which she was convicted,[5] was praised by media sources,[7][8] with the Washington Monthly called it "the most fascinating true crime read of the year."[6]

Levin's book about Linda Taylor, The Queen: The Forgotten Life Behind an American Myth, was published by Little, Brown in May 2019.[9]

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://twitter.com/pergam/status/47569240202547200
  2. ^ "Josh Levin (Tumblr page)". Retrieved 31 March 2010.
  3. ^ "Who We Are". Slate. Archived from the original on 20 June 2011. Retrieved 31 March 2010.
  4. ^ "Hang Up and Listen podcast". Slate. Retrieved 31 March 2010.
  5. ^ a b Levin, Josh. "The Real Story of Linda Taylor, America's Original Welfare Queen". Slate Magazine. Retrieved 2016-11-15.
  6. ^ a b "Slate.com's Josh Levin has published the most fascinating true crime read of the year — and it has an important public policy twist". Washington Monthly. 2013-12-22. Retrieved 2016-11-15.
  7. ^ Jones, Allie. "Everyone Missed the Real Story of Chicago's 'Welfare Queen'". The Atlantic. Retrieved 2016-11-15.
  8. ^ "The Truth Behind The Lies Of The Original 'Welfare Queen'". NPR.org. Retrieved 2016-11-15.
  9. ^ McClelland, Edward (May 16, 2019). "The True Story of Chicago's 'Welfare Queen'". Chicago. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  10. ^ "Awards: Media Reporting/Criticism 2004". Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. Retrieved 31 March 2010.

External links[edit]