Josh Roenicke

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Josh Roenicke
DSC03713 Josh Roenicke.jpg
Roenicke with the Cincinnati Reds
Uni-President Lions – No. 30
Relief pitcher
Born: (1982-08-04) August 4, 1982 (age 36)
Baltimore, Maryland
Bats: Right Throws: Right
Professional debut
MLB: September 13, 2008, for the Cincinnati Reds
CPBL: March 28, 2018, for the Uni-President Lions
MLB statistics
(through 2013 season)
Win–loss record8–3
Earned run average4.17
Strikeouts168
Teams

Joshua James Roenicke (born August 4, 1982) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Uni-President Lions of the Chinese Professional Baseball League. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Cincinnati Reds, Toronto Blue Jays, Colorado Rockies, and Minnesota Twins.

Career[edit]

Cincinnati Reds[edit]

Roenicke was drafted by the Cincinnati Reds in the 10th round of the 2006 Major League Baseball Draft out of UCLA where he was both an outfielder and a relief pitcher, as well as a defensive back and kick returner on the UCLA football team. Beginning his professional career with the Gulf Coast Reds, Roenicke pitched 8 innings and gave up only one run. He was promoted to the Rookie level Billings Mustangs where he finished 2006. He began 2007 with the High-A Sarasota Reds before being promoted to Double-A Chattanooga. Combined, he had a 3–2 record with a 2.31 ERA, 56 strikeouts, and 24 saves. Roenicke remained in Chattanooga to begin 2008, but was promoted to Triple-A Louisville after 22 appearances. In 35 games for Louisville, he had a 2.54 ERA and was promoted to the majors on September 9.

Roenicke made his major league debut on September 13, walking, striking out, and hitting 1 batter each.[1]

Toronto Blue Jays[edit]

On July 31, 2009, he was traded to the Toronto Blue Jays along with Edwin Encarnación and Zach Stewart, in exchange for Scott Rolen and cash considerations

In 2 seasons with the Blue Jays, Roenicke went 1-0 with a 6.38 ERA in 29 games

Colorado Rockies[edit]

On June 2, 2011, Roenicke was claimed off waivers by the Colorado Rockies and was optioned to Triple-A Colorado Springs.[2]

In 2 seasons with the Rockies, Roenicke went 4-2 with a 3.33 ERA in 82 games, most of them coming in 2012.

Minnesota Twins[edit]

The Minnesota Twins claimed him off waivers on November 2, 2012. He was outrighted to the Triple-A Rochester Red Wings on October 2, 2013.

Washington Nationals[edit]

Roenicke signed a minor league contract (including a spring training invitation) with the Washington Nationals on February 14, 2014.[3] After pitching in 23 games for the team's Triple-A affiliate Syracuse Chiefs, he was released on August 4, 2014.[4]

Colorado Rockies[edit]

Roenicke signed a minor league deal with the Colorado Rockies on August 12, 2014. He pitched in 6 games for their Triple-A affiliate.[4]

Milwaukee Brewers[edit]

Roenicke signed a minor league with the Brewers on February 12.[5] He was 7-12 with a 6.15 ERA for their Triple-A affiliate.[4]

Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim[edit]

Roenicke signed a minor league deal with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim on March 7, 2016. He spent 2016 split between the Angels' Advanced-A, Double-A, and Triple-A teams.[4]

Pericos de Puebla[edit]

On February 21, 2017, Roenicke signed with the Pericos de Puebla of the Mexican League.[6] He finished the season with a 7-5 record and a 2.70 ERA in 20 starts for the Pericos, getting selected to the Mexican League All-Star Game (South Division) and carrying the club to its second consecutive championship appearance.

Uni-President Lions[edit]

On February 9, 2018, Roenicke signed with the Uni-President Lions of the Chinese Professional Baseball League.[7] In 26 starts, Roenicke posted a league-leading 3.17 ERA across 156 innings pitched. He re-signed with the Uni-Lions for the 2019 season.[8]

Pitching style[edit]

Roenicke throws five pitches. He has a four-seam fastball thrown at 91–95 mph, a two-seam fastball at 91–94, a slider (82–86), a curveball (76–79), and an occasional changeup (83–85). He does not use his changeup against right-handed hitters. His primary fastball against righties is the four-seamer, while he leans toward the two-seamer against lefties.[9] Despite average to above-average whiff rates on his pitches, he strikes hitters out at a rate well below one per inning.[10]

Personal life[edit]

Roenicke, who grew up in Nevada City, California, comes from a baseball family as his brother Jason plays in Toronto's minor league system, his father Gary played 12 major league seasons from 1976 to 1988 and is currently a scout in the Baltimore Orioles organization,[11] and his uncle Ron played 8 seasons from 1981 to 1988 and was the manager of the Milwaukee Brewers from 2011 to 2015.

Roenicke is the brother-in-law of Colorado Rockies outfielder Ian Desmond, having married Desmond's sister Nikki in 2010.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Former UCLA Standout Josh Roenicke Makes Major League Debut". September 13, 2008, UCLAbruins.com. Retrieved on September 19, 2008.
  2. ^ "June 2011 Transactions". MLB.com. Retrieved June 2, 2011.
  3. ^ Wagner, James (February 14, 2014). "Nationals ink reliever Josh Roenicke, Ian Desmond's brother-in-law, to minor league deal". The Washington Post. Retrieved February 14, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c d Josh Roenicke Minor League Stats
  5. ^ http://fantasynews.cbssports.com/fantasybaseball/update/25067250/brewers-sign-josh-roenicke-to-minor-league-deal
  6. ^ "JOSH ROENICKE SE UNE A LOS PERICOS". deportes.televisa.com (in Spanish). February 21, 2017. Retrieved February 24, 2017.
  7. ^ "Uni-Lions Sign RHP Josh Roenicke". February 9, 2018. Retrieved February 9, 2018.
  8. ^ "Uni-Lions Re-Sign Josh Roenicke for 2019 Season". January 25, 2019. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  9. ^ "Brooks Baseball · Home of the PitchFX Tool - Player Card: Josh Roenicke". Brooks Baseball. Retrieved October 2, 2012.
  10. ^ "Josh Roenicke Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved October 2, 2012.
  11. ^ "Former UCLA Bruins Standout Josh Roenicke Promoted to Cincinnati Reds". September 9, 2008, UCLAbruins.com. Retrieved on September 19, 2008.
  12. ^ Rosencrans, C. Trent (June 28, 2012). "Nats' Ian Desmond takes brother-in-law deep". CBSSports.com. Retrieved March 5, 2014.

External links[edit]