Joshua Madaki

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Joshua Mamman Madaki
Governor of Bauchi State
In office
December 1987 – August 1990
Preceded by Chris Abutu Garuba
Succeeded by Abu Ali
Governor of Plateau State
In office
August 1990 – January 1992
Preceded by Aliyu Kama
Succeeded by Fidelis Tapgun
Personal details
Born July 6, 1947
Kaura LGA, Kaduna State, Nigeria
Died May 7, 2003

Major General (retired) Joshua Mamman Madaki (1947–2003) was Governor of Bauchi State, Nigeria from December 1987 to August 1990 and then of Plateau State from August 1990 to January 1992 during the military regime of Major General Ibrahim Babangida.[1]

Background[edit]

Joshua Mamman Madaki was born on 6 July 1947 in Manchok, Kaura Local Government Area of Kaduna State. He attended St. Paul's College Wusasa. After joining the army, he was among the fourth intake to the Nigerian Defence Academy.[2]

Military career[edit]

During the coup of 27 August 1985 when General Ibrahim Babangida took power, Lt. Colonel Madaki was in command of the 6th Guards Battalion in Bonny Camp. His battalion was placed on standby on Lagos Island, and charged with securing the eastern approaches to Victoria Island.[3] Madaki was promoted to Commander of the Brigade of Guards after the coup.[4]

Babangida promoted Madaki to Colonel and appointed him Governor of Bauchi State in December 1987.[5] He was transferred to Plateau State from August 1990 to January 1992.[1] There was a crisis among the Dong, Tudun Wada and Kabong communities in Jos North, Plateau State during the census of 1991 which prevented the census creating records of these areas. Colonel Madaki set up a judicial commission to determine the ownership of those areas.[6]

Later career[edit]

After retiring from the army, Madaki became a member of the National Democratic Coalition (NADECO), a predominantly Yorubu group pressing the Sani Abacha regime for return to democracy.[7] In the lead-up to the Nigerian Fourth Republic, Madaki became a member of the People's Democratic Party (PDP). In August 2001 Madaki was appointed President of the Nigeria Rugby Football Association.[8] In June 2002 it was reported that he was planning to run for governor of Kaduna State in April 2003 on the All People's Party) (APP) platform, allied with the All Nigeria People's Party.[9]

In October 2002 he moved to the Alliance for Democracy (AD).[10] He planned to run for governor of Kaduna on that platform.[11]

Madaki died in a car crash on 8 May 2003 when one of the tires on his jeep burst, causing the vehicle to somersault.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Nigerian States". WorldStatesmen. Retrieved May 10, 2010. 
  2. ^ Charles Onyekamuo, Ali M. Ali and Agaju Madugba (May 9, 2003). "Joshua Madaki, Ex-Gov, Dies in Road Crash". ThisDay. Archived from the original on September 30, 2007. Retrieved May 10, 2010. 
  3. ^ Nowa Omoigui. "The Palace Coup of August 27, 1985 (PART 2)". Dawodu. Retrieved May 10, 2010. 
  4. ^ Nowa Omoigui. "The Vasta Coup of 1985". Dawodu. Retrieved May 10, 2010. 
  5. ^ Nowa Omoigui. "The Palace Coup of August 27, 1985 (PART 3)". Dawodu. Retrieved May 10, 2010. 
  6. ^ Andrew Agbese, Ahmed Mohaamed Mahmud Lalo (July 29, 2009). "In Jos, the Beroms Must Submit to us - Anaguta Leader". Daily Trust. Retrieved May 10, 2010. 
  7. ^ Eghosa E. Osaghae (1998). Crippled giant: Nigeria since independence. Indiana University Press. p. 300. ISBN 0-253-21197-2. 
  8. ^ Nnamdi Okosieme (September 4, 2001). "Madaki Unfolds Plans for Rugby". P.M. News. Retrieved May 10, 2010. 
  9. ^ George Oji (June 8, 2002). "SCORE-CARD!!!". Thisday. Archived from the original on June 21, 2007. Retrieved May 10, 2010. 
  10. ^ Yusuph Olaniyonu; Frank Kintum; Utibe Uko; Constance Ikokwu; Pius Anakali (October 27, 2002). "2003: The Road Blocks". ThisDay. Archived from the original on April 24, 2005. Retrieved May 10, 2010. 
  11. ^ Wale Olaleye (October 12, 2002). "Bamidele to George: Go to Court And Put Yourself on Trial". ThisDay. Archived from the original on April 24, 2005. Retrieved May 10, 2010. 
  12. ^ Abdullahi M. Gulloma (May 17, 2003). "Mourned by all: Late Major General Joshua Madaki (rtd)". Weekly Trust. Retrieved July 30, 2010.