Journal of Biosocial Science

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Journal of Biosocial Science  
DisciplineBiology, sociology
LanguageEnglish
Edited byC. G. Nicholas Mascie-Taylor
Publication details
Publication history
1969-present
Publisher
FrequencyBimonthly
1.188
Standard abbreviations
J. Biosoc. Sci.
Indexing
CODENJBSLAR
ISSN0021-9320 (print)
1469-7599 (web)
OCLC no.01754471
Links

The Journal of Biosocial Science is a bimonthly peer-reviewed scientific journal covering the intersection of biology and sociology. It was established in 1969 and is published by Cambridge University Press. The editor-in-chief is C. G. Nicholas Mascie-Taylor (University of Cambridge). According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2016 impact factor of 1.188, ranking it 14th out of 26 journals in the category "Demography"[1] and 24th out of 39 journals in the category "Biomedical, Social Sciences".[2]

Notable studies[edit]

The most highly cited study in the journal is A Long-term follow-up study of women using different methods of contraception— an interim report, published in 2008. As of 2017, it has been cited 186 times.[3] In 2006, the journal published a controversial study[4] arguing that Ashkenazi Jews are more intelligent than other ethnic groups as a result of human evolution.[5][6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Journals Ranked by Impact: Demography". 2016 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Clarivate Analytics. 2017.
  2. ^ "Journals Ranked by Impact: Biomedical, Social Sciences". 2016 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Clarivate Analytics. 2017.
  3. ^ Vessey, Martin; Doll, Sir Richard; Peto, Richard; Johnson, Bridget; Wiggins, Peter (31 July 2008). "A Long-term follow-up study of women using different methods of contraception? an interim report". Journal of Biosocial Science. 8 (4). doi:10.1017/S0021932000010890.
  4. ^ Cochran, Gregory; Hardy, Jason; Harpending, Henry (17 June 2005). "Natural history of Ashkenazi intelligence". Journal of Biosocial Science. 38 (5): 659. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.163.3711. doi:10.1017/S0021932005027069. PMID 16867211.
  5. ^ "Natural genius?". The Economist. 2 June 2005. Retrieved 16 June 2017.
  6. ^ Wade, Nicholas (3 June 2005). "Researchers Say Intelligence and Diseases May Be Linked in Ashkenazic Genes". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 June 2017.
  7. ^ Pinker, Steven (26 June 2006). "Groups and Genes". The New Republic. Retrieved 16 June 2017.

External links[edit]