Joyce J. Scott

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Joyce J. Scott
Born 1948 (age 69–70)
Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Nationality American
Education Maryland Institute College of Art, Instituto Allende Mexico
Parent(s) Charlie Scott Jr.,
Elizabeth Talford Scott

Joyce J. Scott (born 1948) is an African-American artist, sculptor, quilter, performance artist, installation artist, lecturer and educator. Named a MacArthur Fellow in 2016,[1] Scott is best known for her figurative sculptures and jewelry using free form, off-loom bead weaving techniques, similar to a peyote stitch. One piece may be constructed with thousands of glass seed or pony beads, and incorporate various other found objects and materials such as glass, quilting, and leather. In 2018, she was hailed for working in new medium —a mixture of soil, clay, straw, and cement — for a sculpture meant to disintegrate and return to the earth.[2] Scott is influenced by a variety of diverse cultures, including Native American and African traditions, illustration and comic books, and pop culture.[3]

Scott is renowned for her social commentary on issues such as racism, sexism, violence, and stereotypes,[4] as well as themes of spiritual healing.

Biography[edit]

"I make jewelry to be worn. And if it tells about scary, icky subjects, then so much the better for the person who has the cojones to wear it in public."[5]

Joyce J. Scott was born in Baltimore in 1948 and has described herself as “a true Baltimore babe and Sandtown girl,” who has lived in a row house in that West Baltimore neighborhood more than four decades.[6] According to a 1977 interview, she spent her first few years in Illinois in a log cabin.[7] She is the daughter of Charlie Scott Jr. and noted quilt maker Elizabeth Talford Scott.[8] Her mother encouraged her creativity and Scott began drawing in elementary school in Baltimore, Maryland.[7] She has a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art (graduated 1970), and a Masters of Fine Arts from the Instituto Allende in Mexico.[9] Later, Scott pursued further education at Rochester Institute of Technology in New York and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Maine.[3]

Scott's own mother was an artist who taught Scott appliqué quilting techniques and encouraged her to pursue her career as an artist.[10] Scott is also influenced by craft traditions in her extended family of "quilters, woodworkers, basketweavers, chair caners, planters and blacksmiths," where people developed skills in more than one craft so that they could survive.[8]

Scott's African influences are manifested in her use of intricate and elaborate decoration. According to scholar Leslie King-Hammond, African arts and tradition functioned to transform every day objects into beautiful decorations.[3]

Scott's practice includes performance in addition to sculpture. Her unapologetically critical and humorous personality is often employed in her performances to critique issues such as feminism, sexism, and racism.[3] Like her jewelry and quilt works, her performance also often addresses storytelling and memory.[11]

Scott's works are held by the Baltimore Museum of Art, Detroit Institute of Arts, Michigan, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, St. Louis, Missouri, the Mint Museum of Art, North Carolina, the Spencer Museum of Art at the University of Kansas, and the Smithsonian Institution.[12]

Images Concealed[edit]

In 1995 Scott responded to the Yale University for the Museum of African Art exhibition Face of the Gods: Art and Altar of Africa and African Americans[13] with an installation titled Images Concealed at the San Francisco Art Institute.[14] Curator Jean-Edith Weiffenbach noted that Scott, "challenged by that exhibition's revelations of the impact of African traditions on Western art, belief systems, and social customs [...] fashioned a reply that uses a contemporary hybrid of craft vocabularies from several cultures in an allegorical language that confronts stereotypes as well as issues of representation and perception."[14]

Kickin' it With the Old Masters[edit]

Kickin' It with the Old Masters was an art exhibition held at the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) in January–May 2000 in collaboration with Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA).[15]

Harriet Tubman and Other Truths[edit]

Her largest exhibition to date[16] opened October 20, 2017, and was scheduled to close, April 1, 2018.[17] The works, a homage to Harriet Tubman, the abolitionist who led many enslaved people to freedom, were organized with guest curator Lowery Stokes Sims for the exhibit, which was seen as a catalyst[16] for transforming the public space created by J. Seward Johnson, the sculptor and philanthropist.[17]

Exhibitions[edit]

Scott's exhibits include:

  • 2018 Joyce J. Scott: Harriet Tubman and Other Truths, Grounds for Sculpture, Hamilton, N.J.
  • 2016 Generations: Joyce J. Scott | Sonya Clark, Goya Contemporary Gallery, Baltimore, MD. Curator: Amy Eva Raehse
  • 2016 Joyce J. Scott, Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA. Curator: Bruce Hoffman
  • 2015 Joyce J. Scott: Truths & Visions, Sarah Moody Gallery, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa AL(catalog). Curator: Patterson Sims
  • 2015 Joyce J. Scott: Truths and Visions, Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland, OH(Catalogue). Curator: Patterson Sims
  • 2014 Can’t We All Just Get Along?, Goya Contemporary, Baltimore MD (Catalogue). Curator: Amy Eva Raehse
  • 2014 Maryland to Murano: Neckpieces and Sculptures by Joyce J. Scott, Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY (catalogue). Curator: Lowery Stokes Sims
  • 2012 On Kilter, Goya Contemporary, Baltimore, MD (Catalogue). Curator: Amy Eva Raehse
  • 2012 Joyce J. Scott: A Solo Exhibition of Prints, Film and Performance, The Creative Alliance, Baltimore, MD
  • 2010-2011 Li’l Lies and Purty Thangs, Goya Contemporary, Baltimore, MD (Catalogue). Curator: Amy Eva Raehse
  • 2010 McColl Center for Visual Art, Charlotte, NC
  • 2010 The Wine Dark Sea, The Mitchell Gallery at St. John's College, Annapolis, MD (Catalogue)
  • 2010 Love Letters, Mobilia, Cambridge MA
  • 2008 Joyce J. Scott: PAINFUL DEATH/PAINLESS LIFE, Goya Contemporary, Baltimore, MD (Catalogue) Curator: Amy Eva Raehse
  • 2008 Joyce J. Scott in Tampa, Scarfone/Hartley Gallery, Tampa University, Tampa, FL
  • 2007 Kickin’ It with Joyce J. Scott, Houston Center for Contemporary Art, Houston, TX. Curator: George Ciscle/ Exhibits USA
  • 2007 Kickin’ It with Joyce J. Scott, Polk Art Museum, Lakeland, FL. Curator George Ciscle/ Exhibits USA
  • 2007 Joyce J. Scott: Breathe, Goya Contemporary, Baltimore, MD (Catalogue) Curator: Amy Eva Raehse
  • 2005 Joyce J. Scott, Dirtwork, C. Grimaldis Gallery, Baltimore, MD.
  • 2005 This Hand Washes That Hand Too, Mesa Contemporary Arts at the Mesa Art Center, Mesa, AZ.
  • 2004 Kickin' It with Joyce J. Scott, California African American Museum, Los Angeles, CA. Curator George Ciscle/ Exhibits USA
  • 2004 Joyce J. Scott, Snyderman Gallery, Philadelphia, PA
  • 2004 Joyce J. Scott, Walter Gropius Artist, Huntington Museum of Art, Huntington, WV
  • 2004 Still Alive in 2004, Ward Center for the Arts, St. Paul Schools, Brooklandville, MD
  • 2003 Joyce J. Scott, Untethered, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA
  • 2003 What a Long, Strange, Bumpy Trip it’s Been!, Sculpture & Monoprints by Joyce J. Scott, Center of Contemporary Arts (COCA), St. Louis, MO
  • 2001 Joyce J. Scott, In Search of Self-Unfathomable, Susan Cummins Gallery, Mill Valley, CA
  • 2001 Joyce J. Scott, WTC Series, Goya Contemporary, Baltimore, MD
  • 2000 Joyce J. Scott, Kickin' it With The Old Masters, Baltimore Museum of Art Baltimore, MD (catalogue). Curator: George Ciscle and the students at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA)
  • 2000 Life After Fifty, Noel Gallery, Charlotte, NC
  • 2000 Treacherous Tickles: Recent Sculpture & Prints, Main Gallery, University of Texas, El Paso, TX
  • 2000 Joyce J. Scott, Sybaris Gallery, Royal Oak, MI
  • 1999 Incognegroism, Richard Anderson Gallery, New York, NY
  • 1999 Joyce J. Scott, A Muse, American Craft Museum, New York, NY
  • 1999 Joyce J. Scott, The Radiance of What Is, Contemporary Art Center of Virginia, Virginia Beach, VA
  • 1999 Joyce J. Scott: New Lithographs and Monoprints, Goya Contemporary, Baltimore, MD[18]
  • 1998 Things That Go Bump in the Night II, Gallery 181, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
  • 1996 Joyce Scott, Mixed Bag, Leedy Voulkos Gallery, Kansas City, MO
  • 1995 Images Concealed, San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, CA (catalogue)
  • 1995 Joyce J. Scott, The Hand and the Spirit, Scottsdale, AZ
  • 1994 Hard Choices, Laumeier Sculpture Park, St. Louis, MO (catalogue)
  • 1992 Joyce J. Scott, Brooklyn College of Art Gallery, Brooklyn, NY (traveling, catalogue)
  • 1992 Dimensional Objects and Jewelry, Politics of the Body, Esther Saks Fine Art, Ltd, Chicago, Illinois[10]
  • 1991 I-con-no-body / I-con-o-graphy, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (catalogue)
  • 1988 Thru the Veil-, Textile Center for the Arts, Chicago, Illinois[10]
  • 1985 Dreamweaver, The Cultural Center, Chicago Public Library, Illinois[10]
  • 1981 Something Got a Hold on Me, Washington Project for the Arts, Washington, DC[10]
  • 1981 Something Got a Hold on Me, Washington Project for the Arts, Washington, DC[18]

Select honors and awards[edit]

Below are a few selected awards, honors and fellowships Scott has received so far in her career:[19]

  • MacArthur Fellow, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Chicago, IL (2016)
  • Masters of the Medium, James Renwick Alliance, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (2006)
  • Governor's Arts Award at Artsalute: Maryland Citizens for the Arts Foundation, Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, MD (2002)
  • Fellow, American Craft Council, New York, NY (2001)
  • National Living Treasure Award, Maryland Nominee (1996)
  • Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation Award (1994)
  • Pace Roberts Fellowship (1994)
  • National Printing Fellowship (1992)
  • Mid Atlantic Consortium Award (1990)
  • Maryland State Arts Council Fellowship (1987, 1981)
  • Fellowship, National Endowment of the Arts (1980)

Museum collections[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Joyce J. Scott: Kickin’ It with the Old Masters. Baltimore, MD: Baltimore Museum of Art : Maryland Institute, College of Art. 2000. pp. 108 p. ISBN 0912298723. 
  • Stankard, Paul J. "Burning Embers." Glass Quarterly, no. 136 (Autumn 2014): 26-34.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MacArthur Foundation announces 2016 class of 'Genius' fellows". Newsweek. 2016-09-22. Retrieved 2018-03-10. 
  2. ^ magazine, Baltimore (2018-02-19). "MacArthur Genius Joyce Scott Charts New Artistic Territory". Baltimore magazine. Retrieved 2018-03-10. 
  3. ^ a b c d "U.S. Department of State - Art in Embassies". art.state.gov. Retrieved 2016-04-28. 
  4. ^ "Joyce J. Scott: U.S Department of State – Art in Embassies". 
  5. ^ "Joyce Scott". Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery. Retrieved 2014-02-01. 
  6. ^ Smith, Tim. "Baltimore artist Joyce Scott named MacArthur Fellow". baltimoresun.com. Retrieved 2018-03-10. 
  7. ^ a b Naomi Eftis, Host; Elaine Heffernan, A woman artist speaks / Joyce Scott ; interviewed by Naomi Eftis and Elaine Heffernan., retrieved 2017-03-11 
  8. ^ a b Maria Gallagher, "The Scotts Reap What they Sew: Artists are Influenced by Slavery, African-American Themes," Daily News (September 8, 1989).
  9. ^ Stankard, Paul J. (Autumn 2014). "Burning Embers". Glass Quarterly. 
  10. ^ http://art.state.gov/artistdetail.aspx?id=159616
  11. ^ Smyers, Robyn Minter (2000). "Re-making the past: the black oral tradition in contemporary art". International Review Of African American Art. 17: 47–53. 
  12. ^ "Joyce J. Scott Online". Art Cyclopedia. Retrieved 2014-02-01. 
  13. ^ Thompson, Robert Farris (1995-01-01). "Face of the Gods: The Artists and Their Altars". African Arts. 28 (1): 50–61. doi:10.2307/3337250. JSTOR 3337250. 
  14. ^ a b Scott, Joyce (1995). Images Concealed. Jean-Edith Weiffenbach. San Francisco: San Francisco Art Institute. p. 5. ISBN 093049525X. 
  15. ^ McNatt, Glenn (2000-01-23). "Laughter, Tears and Social Commentary". Baltimore Sun News. Retrieved 2016-05-10. 
  16. ^ a b Princenthal, Nancy (2018). "Inspired by Harriet Tubman, an Artist Takes Glass to Extremes". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-03-10. 
  17. ^ a b "Grounds For Sculpture". Grounds For Sculpture. Retrieved 2018-03-10. 
  18. ^ a b Scott, Joyce (2000). Kickin' It with the Old Masters - Catalog. Baltimore, MD: Baltimore Museum of Art. pp. 95–96. ISBN 978-0912298726. 
  19. ^ Oldknow, Tina (2014). Collecting Contemporary Glass. Corning, New York: The Corning Museum of Glass. p. 276. ISBN 978-0-87290-201-5. 
  20. ^ "Museum of Arts and Design Collection Database". collections.madmuseum.org. Retrieved 2016-03-03. 
  21. ^ "Museum of Arts and Design Collection Database". collections.madmuseum.org. Retrieved 2016-03-03. 
  22. ^ "Museum of Arts and Design Collection Database". collections.madmuseum.org. Retrieved 2016-03-03. 
  23. ^ "Collection Search | Corning Museum of Glass". www.cmog.org. Retrieved 2016-03-03. 

External links[edit]

  1. ^ Sculpture, Grounds For (2017-10-27), Joyce J. Scott: Harriet Tubman and Other Truths | Grounds For Sculpture, retrieved 2018-03-10