Juan Antonio Bardem

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Juan Antonio Bardem
(Juan Antonio Bardem) Spaanse verkiezingen Santiago Carrillo (PCE) presenteert kandidaten voor zijn …, Bestanddeelnr 929-2263 (cropped).jpg
Bardem in 1977
Born
Juan Antonio Bardem Muñoz

(1922-06-02)2 June 1922
Madrid, Spain
Died30 October 2002(2002-10-30) (aged 80)
Madrid, Spain[1]
Occupation(s)Film director, screenwriter
Years active1951–1997
SpouseMaría Aguado Barbado
Children4; including Miguel
Parents
RelativesPilar Bardem (sister)

Juan Antonio Bardem Muñoz (2 June 1922 – 30 October 2002) was a Spanish film director and screen writer, born in Madrid. He was a member of the Communist Party.[2] Bardem was best known for Muerte de un ciclista (1955) which won the FIPRESCI Prize at the 1955 Cannes Film Festival, and El puente (1977) which won the Golden Prize at the 10th Moscow International Film Festival.[3] His 1979 film Seven Days in January won the Golden Prize at the 11th Moscow International Film Festival.[4] In 1981 he was a member of the jury at the 12th Moscow International Film Festival.[5] In 1993 he was a member of the jury at the 43rd Berlin International Film Festival.[6] In 1953 he and Luis García Berlanga founded a film magazine, Objetivo, which existed until 1956.[7] Bardem is the father of director Miguel Bardem and uncle of actor Javier Bardem. Bardem died in Madrid in 2002, at age 80.

Filmography[edit]

Director[edit]

Screenwriter[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Juan Antonio Bardem". November 2002.
  2. ^ Marvin D'Lugo (1991). The Films of Carlos Saura: The Practice of Seeing. Princeton University Press. p. 20. ISBN 0-691-00855-8. Retrieved 4 February 2017.
  3. ^ "10th Moscow International Film Festival (1977)". MIFF. Archived from the original on 16 January 2013. Retrieved 20 January 2013.
  4. ^ "11th Moscow International Film Festival (1979)". MIFF. Archived from the original on 3 April 2014. Retrieved 20 January 2013.
  5. ^ "12th Moscow International Film Festival (1981)". MIFF. Archived from the original on 21 April 2013. Retrieved 21 January 2013.
  6. ^ "Berlinale: 1993 Juries". berlinale.de. Retrieved 29 May 2011.
  7. ^ Virginia Higginbotham (27 January 2014). Spanish Film Under Franco. University of Texas Press. p. 25. ISBN 978-0-292-76147-6. Retrieved 4 February 2017.

External links[edit]