Judy Wajcman

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Judy Wajcman
Judy Wajcman.jpg
Born (1950-12-12) 12 December 1950 (age 67)
Academic work
Main interestsSocial studies of technology
Notable worksTechnoFeminism

Judy Wajcman, FBA (born 12 December 1950),[1] is the Anthony Giddens Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Science.[2] She is a Visiting Professor at the Oxford Internet Institute. Her scholarly interests encompass the sociology of work, science and technology studies, gender theory, and organizational analysis. Her work has been translated into French, German, Greek, Korean, Japanese, Portuguese and Spanish. Prior to joining the LSE in 2009, she was a Professor of Sociology in the Research School of Social Sciences at the Australian National University.[3] She was the first woman fellow at St. John's College, Cambridge (Norman Laski Research Fellow 1978–80).[4]

Wajcman was President of the Society for the Social Studies of Science [5] (2009-2011), and is the recipient of the William F. Ogburn Career Achievement Award of the American Sociological Association (2013). She received an honorary doctorate from the University of Geneva (2015) and was elected a Fellow of the British Academy (2016).[6] Her book Pressed for Time is the (2017) winner of the Ludwik Fleck prize of the Society for Social Studies of Science.

Research[edit]

Wajcman is probably best known for her analysis of the gendered nature of technology.[7] She was an early contributor to the social studies of technology, as well as to studies of gender, work, and organisations.[8][9]

Selected bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Wajcman, Judy (1983). Women in control: dilemmas of a workers co-operative. New York City: St. Martin's Press. ISBN 9780312887377.
  • MacKenzie, Donald; Wajcman, Judy (1985). The social shaping of technology: how the refrigerator got its hum. Milton Keynes Philadelphia: Open University Press. ISBN 9780335150267.
  • Wajcman, Judy (1991). Feminism confronts technology. University Park, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State University Press. ISBN 9780271008028.
  • Wajcman, Judy (1998). Managing like a man: women and men in corporate management. University Park, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State University Press. ISBN 9780271018485.
  • Wajcman, Judy (2004). TechnoFeminism. Cambridge Malden, Massachusetts: Polity. ISBN 9780745630441.
  • Edwards, Paul; Wajcman, Judy (2005). The politics of working life. Oxford New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780191556692.
  • Hackett, Edward; Amsterdamska, Olga; Lynch, Michael; Wajcman, Judy (2008). The handbook of science and technology studies (3rd ed.). Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press Published in co-operation with the Society for the Social Studies of Science. ISBN 9781435605046.
  • Wajcman, Judy (2015). Pressed for time: the acceleration of life in digital capitalism. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. ISBN 9780226196473.
  • Wajcman, Judy; Dodd, Nigel (2017).The sociology of speed: Digital, organizational, and social temporalities. Oxford, United Kingdom Oxford University Press. ISBN 0198782853. OCLC 952384327.

Book chapters[edit]

  • Wajcman, Judy (2001), "Gender and technology", in Wright, James D.; Smelser, Neil J.; Baltes, Paul B., International encyclopedia of the social & behavioral sciences (volume 9), Amsterdam New York: Elsevier, pp. 5976–5979, ISBN 9780080430768.
  • Bittman, Michael; Wajcman, Judy (2004), "The rush hour: the quality of leisure time and gender equity", in Folbre, Nancy; Bittman, Michael, Family time: the social organization of care, London New York: Routledge, pp. 171–194 ISBN 9780203411650
  • Martin, Bill; Wajcman, Judy (2004), "Understanding class inequality in Australia", in Devine, Fiona; Waters, Mary C., Social inequalities in comparative perspective, Malden, Massachusetts: Blackwell Publishing, pp. 163–190, ISBN 9780631226857.
  • Chesley, Noelle; Sübak, Andra; Wajcman, Judy (2013), "Information and communication technology use and work-life integration", in Major, Debra A.; Burke, Ronald J., Handbook of work-life integration of professionals: challenges and opportunities, Cheltenham, UK Massachusetts, USA: Edward Elgar, pp. 245–268, ISBN 9781781009284.

Journal articles[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Wajcman, Judy". Library of Congress. Retrieved 13 February 2015. Sources: found: The Social shaping of technology, 1998: CIP t.p. (Judy Wajcman, Sch. Soc., Aust. Nat. Univ.) data sheet (b. 12/12/50)
  2. ^ "Wajcman, Judy". London School of Economics and Political Science. Retrieved 10 June 2015.
  3. ^ Folbre, Nancy; Bittman, Michael (2004), "Contributors", in Folbre, Nancy; Bittman, Michael, Family time: the social organization of care, London New York: Routledge, p. x ISBN 9780203411650
  4. ^ "Professor Judy Wajcman". London School of Economics and Political Science. Retrieved 10 June 2015.
  5. ^ "Past Presidents and Council Members: Presidents". 4sonline.org. Society for the Social Studies of Science. Retrieved 10 June 2015.
  6. ^ "British Academy announces new President and elects 66 new Fellows". 15 Jul 2016.
  7. ^ Wajcman, Judy (2001), "Gender and technology", in Wright, James D.; Smelser, Neil J.; Baltes, Paul B., International encyclopedia of the social & behavioral sciences (volume 9), Amsterdam New York: Elsevier, pp. 5976–5979, ISBN 9780080430768.
  8. ^ Major, Debra A.; Burke, Ronald J. (2013), "Contributors", in Major, Debra A.; Burke, Ronald J., Handbook of work-life integration of professionals: challenges and opportunities, Cheltenham, UK Massachusetts, USA: Edward Elgar, p. xv, ISBN 9781781009284.
  9. ^ Lyon, Stina (22 January 2015). "Pressed for time: The acceleration of life in digital capitalism, by Judy Wajcman (book review)". Times Higher Education. TES Global. Retrieved 10 June 2015. Her most significant message, however, relates to gender. Earlier work on the relationship between modernity, technology and time pressures engendered by the commodification of labour focused largely on men, as employers, capitalists and worker-employees, and thus on the labour process in the public domain of production, and not on the interrelated difficulties in "doing domestic time" in care, child-rearing and home maintenance.