Juglans major

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Juglans major
Juglans major Morton.jpg
Juglans major
Morton Arboretum acc. 614-47*1
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Fagales
Family: Juglandaceae
Genus: Juglans
Section: Juglans sect. Rhysocaryon
Species: J. major
Binomial name
Juglans major
Juglans major range map 1.png
Natural range of Juglans major
Synonyms[1][2]
  • Juglans elaeopyren Dode
  • Juglans microcarpa subsp. major (Torr.) A.E. Murray
  • Juglans microcarpa var. major (Torr.) L.D. Benson
  • Juglans rupestris var. major Torr

Juglans major (literally, the larger walnut), also known as Arizona walnut, is a walnut tree which grows to 50 ft tall (15 m) with a DBH of up to 0.61 metres (2 ft) at elevations of 300–2,130 m (1,000–7,000 ft) in Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah.[3] It also occurs in Mexico as far south as Guerrero.[4] Common names include Arizona black walnut (as it belongs to the "black walnuts" section Juglans sect. Rhysocaryon), and the Spanish name nogal cimarrón (cimarron walnut).

Description[edit]

In moister areas, the tree features a single, stout trunk; there are usually several slender trunks in drier situations.[5] The 8–14 in long pinnately compound leaves bear 9–15 lanceolate leaflets, 19–32 mm (.75–1.25 in) wide by 51–102 mm (2–4 in) long. The small nut has a thick shell with deep grooves enclosing an oily, edible seed.[6][7]

Where the range of J. major overlaps that of J. microcarpa, the two interbreed, producing many intermediate forms.[8][9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tropicos
  2. ^ The Plant List
  3. ^ http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=JUMA
  4. ^ Laferriere, J.E. (1993). Juglandaceae, Walnut Family. Journal of the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science 27:219.
  5. ^ Kershner, Mathews, Nelson, and Spellenberg (2008). National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Trees of North America Inc, New York: Sterling Publishing Co., p. 228.
  6. ^ Heller, Amos Arthur. (1909). Muhlenbergia; a Journal of Botany 1(4): 50.
  7. ^ Torrey, John. (1853). Report of an Expedition down to the Zuni and Colorado Rivers 171, pl. 16.
  8. ^ Vines, Robert A. (1960). Trees, shrubs, and woody vines of the Southwest. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press. 1104 p
  9. ^ Powell, A. Michael. (1988). Trees & shrubs of Trans-Pecos Texas including Big Bend and Guadalupe Mountains National Parks. Big Bend National Park, TX: Big Bend Natural History Association. 536 p.

External links[edit]

Data related to Juglans major at Wikispecies