Jules Abadie

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Jules Abadie (12 August 1876 – 10 August 1953[1]) was a French politician and surgeon in Oran, French Algeria, acting as a member of the Comité Français de Libération Nationale (CFLN).

Biography[edit]

Jean Baptiste Marie Jules Abadie was born 12 August 1876 in Blaye, Girone.[2]

Exempt from military service in 1896 for tuberculosis, he volunteered as a medic during the War of 14-18 and again during 39-40 [3] before being promoted to Colonel of the Reserves for his service [4]

In 1901, Abadie started his career as a surgeon in Montpellier. Then in 1904, following the completion of a series of entrance exams,[5] he moved to the Hospital of Oran, where he would become the chief surgeon.[6] Abadie also ran a medical clinic in Maramar, where he worked with his wife who was also a doctor.[7] His work as a researcher, particularly in the field of Gastric Surgery and Emergency war surgery gained him notoriety in France and abroad. As such, he became a member of the Academy of Surgeons, correspondent of the Academy of Doctors and a representative of North Africa to the International Society of Surgeons.[8]

Between 1907 and 1910 he was a delegate from Oran to the Financial Delegation in Algeria.[9]

Due to his close relationship with Henri Giraud, during the Second World War, Abadie served as Commissioner of Justice in the Comité Français de Libération Nationale (CFLN) from June to September 1943 and as Commissioner of Education and Health from June to November.[10] Being a proponent of Henri Giraud, Abadie lost his functions after Giraud resigned the CFLN co-presidency in November 1943.

When Giraud lost control of the CFLN, Abadie was sent on a mission to North America to study how public health initiatives on hygiene were functioning.

For 2 months in 1948, Abadie was mayor of Oran.[11] He died on 10 August 1953.[12]

Private Life[edit]

His spouse, Helene Feyguine, was born on 21 May 1888 in Samara, Russia. She became a doctor of medicine in 1905. Together they would have 2 daughters, Helene and Nicole and one son, Jean.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.academie-medecine.fr/detailMembre.cfm?langue=fr&idRub=19&idLigne=125667 (in French)
  2. ^ http://www.academie-medecine.fr/?langue=en&idRub=19&idLigne=125667
  3. ^ http://www.culture.gouv.fr/public/mistral/leonore_fr?ACTION=CHERCHER&FIELD_1=COTE&VALUE_1=19800035%2F51%2F6220
  4. ^ Alfred Salinas, Quand Franco réclamait Oran: L'Opération Cisneros p.220
  5. ^ Un parlement colonial: les délégations financières algériennes, 1898-1945 p.402 Jacques Bouveresse
  6. ^ http://www.culture.gouv.fr/public/mistral/leonore_fr?ACTION=CHERCHER&FIELD_1=COTE&VALUE_1=19800035%2F51%2F6220
  7. ^ Alfred Salinas, Quand Franco réclamait Oran: L'Opération Cisneros p.220
  8. ^ Un parlement colonial: les délégations financières algériennes, 1898-1945 p.402 Jacques Bouveresse
  9. ^ Un parlement colonial: les délégations financières algériennes, 1898-1945 p.402 Jacques Bouveresse
  10. ^ Jacques Risse, Les professions médicales en politique (1875-2002) p160, 2004 (in French)
  11. ^ http://www.villedoran.com/p45.html [archive]
  12. ^ http://www.academie-medecine.fr/detailMembre.cfm?langue=en&idRub=19&idLigne=125667 [archive]
  13. ^ Alfred Salinas, Quand Franco réclamait Oran: L'Opération Cisneros p.220

Bibliography[edit]

  • Alfred Salinas, Jules Abadie, Itinéraire d'un médecin devenu ministre et maire d'Oran, L'Harmattan, Paris, 2015
Political offices
Preceded by
René Cassin
Commissioner of Justice
1943
Succeeded by
François de Menthon
Preceded by
René Cassin
Commissioner of Education
1943
Succeeded by
René Capitant
Preceded by
Commissioner of Health
1943
Succeeded by
François Billoux