Julia Samuel

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Julia Aline Samuel MBE (born 12 September 1959; née Guinness)[1] is a British psychotherapist and paediatric counsellor.[2]

Biography[edit]

Julia Samuel is the daughter of Old Etonian James Edward Alexander Rundell Guinness, CBE, a partner in- and later chairman of- his family's bank, Guinness Mahon, and chairman of the Public Works Loan Board from 1970 to 1990, and his wife Pauline, daughter of Lt-Col Howard Vivien Mander, of Congreve Manor, Penkridge, Staffordshire. James Guinness descends from the founder of the Guinness Mahon bank, Robert Rundell Guinness, a member of the Anglo-Irish Guinness family. Samuel's brother Hugo Guinness is an artist and model, and her sister is Sabrina Guinness.[3][4] She is one of the seven godparents of Prince George of Cambridge.

Julia is a psychotherapist specialising in grief and worked as a bereavement counsellor in the NHS paediatrics department of St Mary's Hospital, Paddington, where she pioneered the role of maternity and paediatric psychotherapy. In 1994 she helped launch and establish Child Bereavement UK, and as Founder Patron, continues to play an active role in the charity.

She married the Honourable Michael Samuel, of the Hill Samuel banking family, son of Peter Samuel, 4th Viscount Bearsted.[5]

Samuel was appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in the 2016 New Year Honours for services to bereaved parents of babies.[6] She is a Vice President of British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy and is an Honorary Doctor of Middlesex University.

Her first book, Grief Works: Stories of Life, Death and Surviving, was published in 2017.[7]

Samuel's second book This Too Shall Pass: Stories of Change, Crisis and Hopeful Beginnings is published on 5 March 2020.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, 106th edition, vol. 1, ed. Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage Ltd, 1999, p. 219
  2. ^ "Heiress, Diana's friend...NHS grief therapist". The Times. 26 February 2018. Retrieved 4 May 2018.
  3. ^ Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, 106th edition, vol. 1, ed. Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage Ltd, 1999, p. 219
  4. ^ Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, 107th edition, vol. 1, ed. Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage Ltd, 2003, p. 219
  5. ^ Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, 106th edition, vol. 1, ed. Charles Mosley, Burke's Peerage Ltd, 1999, p. 219
  6. ^ "No. 61450". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 December 2015. p. N24.
  7. ^ Samuel, Julia (6 November 2017). "For Texas survivors, there are no quick fixes for grief". CNN. Retrieved 30 April 2020.