Julian Voss-Andreae

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Heart of Steel (Hemoglobin) (2005) by Julian Voss-Andreae. The images show the 5' (1.60 m) tall sculpture right after installation, after 10 days, and after several months of exposure to the elements.

Julian Voss-Andreae (born 15 August 1970) is a German sculptor living and working in the U.S.

Voss-Andreae is a descendant of the German pastor Johann Valentin Andreae, author of one of the earliest texts of Rosicrucianism, The Chemical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreuz (1616). His full first name is Johann Julian, in honor of his ancestor. According to an interview with the artist by Jonathan Schorsch, Voss-Andreae attended a Rudolf Steiner school in Germany from grades 9 to 13.[1]

Voss-Andreae was born in Hamburg, West Germany and started out as a painter.[2] He later studied experimental physics at the universities of Berlin, Edinburgh and Vienna. Voss-Andreae pursued his graduate research in quantum physics in Anton Zeilinger's research group, participating in an experiment demonstrating quantum behavior for the largest objects to date.[3] He moved to the U.S. in 2000 and graduated from the Pacific Northwest College of Art in 2004.

Voss-Andreae’s work is heavily influenced by his background in science. His work includes protein sculptures,[4] such as Angel of the West (2008),[5][6] a large-scale outdoor sculpture for the Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter, Florida portraying the human antibody molecule, a sculpture for Nobel laureate Roderick MacKinnon based on the ion channel structure,[7] and the quantum physics-inspired Quantum Man (2006).[8][9]

Recent work includes an exhibition at the American Center for Physics displaying a series of sculptures inspired by concepts from quantum physics.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schorsch, Jonathan. "Julian Voss-Andreae, Angel of the West." Essay. In Conversations: An Online Journal of the Center for the Study of Material and Visual Cultures of Religion (2016). doi:10.22332/con.ess.2016.1 http://mavcor.yale.edu/conversations/essays/julian-voss-andreae-angel-west
  2. ^ Wallace, Julie (Spring 2008). "Protein Sculptures for the People" (PDF). AWIS Magazine: 14–17. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2008-11-20. Retrieved 2013-04-25. 
  3. ^ Arndt, Markus; O. Nairz; J. Voss-Andreae; C. Keller; G. van der Zouw; A. Zeilinger (14 October 1999). "Wave-particle duality of C60" (PDF). Nature. 401 (6754): 680–682. Bibcode:1999Natur.401..680A. doi:10.1038/44348. PMID 18494170. Retrieved 2009-01-12. 
  4. ^ Voss-Andreae, Julian (February 2005). "Protein Sculptures: Life's Building Blocks Inspire Art" (PDF). Leonardo. 38 (1): 41–45. doi:10.1162/leon.2005.38.1.41. Retrieved 2009-01-12. 
  5. ^ Schorsch, Jonathan. "Julian Voss-Andreae, Angel of the West." Essay. In Conversations: An Online Journal of the Center for the Study of Material and Visual Cultures of Religion (2016). doi:10.22332/con.ess.2016.1 http://mavcor.yale.edu/conversations/essays/julian-voss-andreae-angel-west
  6. ^ Sauter, Eric (November 10, 2008). "New Sculpture Portraying Human Antibody as Protective Angel Installed on Scripps Florida Campus". The Scripps Research Institute. Retrieved 2009-01-12. 
  7. ^ Ball, Philip (March 2008). "The crucible: Art inspired by science should be more than just a pretty picture". Chemistry World. 5 (3): 42–43. Retrieved 2009-01-12. 
  8. ^ "Dual Nature". Science Magazine. August 18, 2006. Retrieved 2009-01-12. 
  9. ^ Farr, Sheila (July 27, 2007). "Sculpture show takes steps in right direction". The Seattle Times. Retrieved 2009-01-12. 
  10. ^ Ball, Philip (26 November 2009). "Quantum objects on show" (PDF). Nature. 462 (7272): 416. Bibcode:2009Natur.462..416B. doi:10.1038/462416a. Retrieved 2009-01-12. 

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