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Julie Arliss

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Julie Arliss
Julie Arliss, July 2018.jpg
Arliss in July 2018
Born 1963
Nationality British
Alma mater University of Exeter
Occupation Teacher, author, conference organizer
Employer King's College, Taunton

Julie Ann Arliss (born 1963)[1] is a British teacher of philosophy of religion and ethics at King's College, Taunton, an independent secondary school in Somerset, England.[2] Arliss is known for the conferences she organizes for schools on philosophy and religion.[3][4] She is the co-author, with Peter Vardy, of The Thinker's Guide to God (2003) and The Thinker's Guide to Evil (2003).

Education and teaching[edit]

Arliss graduated from the University of Exeter with a BA.[2] She is the former head of religious studies at Richard Huish College, Taunton.[3] In 2002 her teaching at Richard Huish College featured in a Channel 4 documentary by Ian Rankin on the problem of evil.[5] She has worked for King's College, Taunton, since at least 2010.[6]

Conferences[edit]

Arliss has organized sixth-form conferences on philosophy of religion since at least 2002.[3] In 2009 she co-founded the Symposium for Philosophy and Religion, which held annual debates and lectures in schools.[7] She founded Academy Conferences Ltd in 2009[1] and Academy Knowledge Network Ltd, later named Academy Ltd, in 2016.[8][9] The companies hold conferences for schools; speakers have included Keith Ward and Daphne Hampson.[10][11]

In 2014 Arliss was part of a group that introduced the Philosothon movement, which began in Australia, to the UK. Arliss worked on the project with Father Mark Smith, head of philosophy and religion at King’s College, Taunton; Lizzie Lewis of SAPERE; and Michael Lacewing of Heythrop College.[4][12]

Selected works[edit]

  • (2000) with Peter Vardy. "The Matrix", Dialogue Australasia, Issue 3, May 2000, pp. 26–29.
  • (2003) with Peter Vardy. The Thinker's Guide to God. Alresford, Hants: John Hunt Publishing Ltd.
  • (2003) with Peter Vardy. The Thinker's Guide to Evil. Alresford, Hants: John Hunt Publishing Ltd.
  • (2005) "The Da Vinci Code and the Sacred Feminine". Dialogue Australasia. Issue 14, November 2005.
  • (2011) "Smoking Gun". Dialogue Australasia. Issue 25, May 2011.
  • (2012) "Pornography and Education". Dialogue Australasia. Issue 27, May 2012, pp. 22–25.
  • (2013) "The Big Idea of Tolerance". Dialogue Australasia. Issue 29, May 2013.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Academy Conferences Ltd". London: Companies House. Archived from the original on 15 October 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Our Staff". King's College, Taunton. Archived from the original on 13 August 2018. 
  3. ^ a b c Day, Malcolm (10 December 2002). "Divine inspiration fills sixth-form pews". The Guardian.
  4. ^ a b Higgitt, Dave (11 February 2015). "Young philosophers have winning thoughts". Independent Education Today.
  5. ^ Rankin, Ian (2002). "Evil Thoughts", Channel 4, courtesy of YouTube, 00:02:19.
  6. ^ "Staff List". King's College, Taunton. Archived from the original on 9 December 2010. 
  7. ^ "Symposium for Philosophy and Religion". King's College, Taunton. Archived from the original on 21 August 2017. 
  8. ^ "Academy Knowledge Network Ltd". London: Companies House. Archived from the original on 20 October 2017. 
  9. ^ "Academy Ltd". London: Companies House. Archived from the original on 13 August 2018. 
  10. ^ "Centre for Biblical Studies". University of Exeter. Retrieved 11 September 2017. 
  11. ^ "OCR Religious Studies Conference 2017", ocr.org.uk. Retrieved 27 October 2017.
  12. ^ "What is a Philosothon?". Philosothon UK. Archived from the original on 30 May 2018. 

Further reading[edit]