Julie Kitchen

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Julie Kitchen
BornJulie Kitchen
(1977-04-19) 19 April 1977 (age 43)
Penzance, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom
Other namesThe Queen of Muay Thai
NationalityEnglish
Height1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)[1]
Weight59 kg (130 lb; 9.3 st)[1]
StyleMuay Thai, kickboxing[1]
StanceOrthodox
Fighting out ofPenzance, England
TeamTouchgloves Gym[1]
TrainerNathan Kitchen[1]
Years active2002–2012[1]
Kickboxing record
Total61
Wins51
Losses9
No contests1
last updated on: 8 September 2014

Julie Kitchen (born 19 April 1977) is a retired professional English female kickboxer, muay thai fighter and sports commentator.[1]

Early life[edit]

Julie Kitchen was born at Truro Hospital to parents Ivor and Lynn Barrett, as the middle child of three daughters. Between the ages of six and eleven she attended St.Paul's School in Penzance, Cornwall. She was a shy child making very few friends and was content with family life. Her family was very close and she played the role of a second mother to her younger sister. At the age of eleven she decided to become a vegetarian because she did not like the taste of meat. She remains a vegetarian to this day, but now includes fish into her diet.[1]

At the age of twelve she started at Humphry Davy School in Penzance where she continued to find socialising uncomfortable due to shyness. Although she did not like school, she enjoyed the subjects of Art, Mathematics and Physical Education. During this time she began to excel at the sports of hockey, netball and athletics.[1]

In 1989 she enrolled in the Sea Cadets, and by the time she was sixteen had worked her way up the ranks to Petty Officer. She was awarded the honour of Lord Lieutenant's Cadet. Before leaving the Sea Cadets in 1993 she had considered working her way into teaching in the Navy. Julie Kitchen attributes the Sea Cadets has a major part of overcoming her shyness.[1]

In 1993, at the age of sixteen, she went on to study a Leisure and Tourism course at Penwith College after finishing school and leaving the Sea Cadets. In this year she met her future husband, and coach Nathan Kitchen.[1]

On 26 February 1999 she gave birth to twin daughters Allaya Kitchen and Amber Kitchen. Shortly after the birth of the twins, at the age of twenty-four, she joined Touchgloves Gym in Penzance to lose weight.[1]

Career[edit]

Julie Kitchen won her professional debut in March 2002 against Diane Fletcher from Liverpool, England.[1]

During her career she faced fighters from fifteen different countries. She was the first British woman to win a WBC title.[1]

Her last fight was in Los Angeles, California against British fighter Amanda Kelly on 12 January 2012. She lost via split decision after five rounds. She officially retired later that month.[1][2]

Championships and awards[edit]

[1][3]

Titles[edit]

Other Titles[edit]

    • 2007 Golden Belt European Champion, 61.5 kg
    • 2006 BKK Female British Junior Welterweight Champion, 63.5 kg
    • 2005 BMBC English Champion, 60 kg
    • 2005 FIST British Champion, 63 kg (1 defence)
    • 2004 BKK British Champion, 63 kg

Awards[edit]

  • Awakening Fighters
    • 2012 AOCA / Awakening Outstanding Contribution Award

Other Awards[edit]

    • 2011 Pride of Cornwall Award (The first ever female to win this award)
    • 2011 Fighters Hall of Fame / Best Female Martial Artist
  • International Sport Kickboxing Association
    • 2010 ISKA Fighter of the Year
    • 2009 ISKA Fighter of the Year

After retirement[edit]

Julie Kitchen is a sports commentator for the Enfusion promotion.

Kickboxing record[edit]

Kickboxing Record (incomplete)

Legend:   Win   Loss   Draw/No contest   Notes

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Julie Kitchen Awakening Profile". Awakeningfighters.com. Retrieved 8 September 2014.
  2. ^ "Muay Thai Champ Julie Kitchen Retires". Wombat Sports. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  3. ^ "Julie Kitchen Interview". mymuaythai.com. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  4. ^ "Jamaica's Brown wins Muay Thai world title". Jamaica's Gleaner. Retrieved 24 November 2014.

External links[edit]