Julio J. Henna

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Dr. José Julio Henna Pérez
Born24 May 1848
Ponce, Puerto Rico
Died2 February 1924
Ponce, Puerto Rico
NationalityPuerto Rican
EducationColumbia University
Years active1872 - 1924
Known forCo-founder of the New York City French Hospital,
Co-founder of the Puerto Rico section of the Cuban Revolutionary Party in New York
Medical career
ProfessionPhysician
InstitutionsNew York City French Hospital, Bellevue Hospital.

Julio J. Henna was a Puerto Rican physician and political figure. Henna participated in the founding of the Puerto Rico Section of the Cuban Revolutionary Party in New York. He later supported the annexation of Puerto Rico to the United States.[1]

Early years[edit]

Jose Julio Henna Perez[2] was born at 24 Isabel street in Ponce, Puerto Rico,[1] on 24 May 1848.[3] His parents were Jose Henna Darricot - an Englishman - and Maria del Rosario Perez y Garcia, a Puerto Rican member of the privileged upper class.[3]

Political incursion[edit]

When he was twenty years old, Henna designed a plan to liberate Puerto Rico from Spanish colonialism. The plan failed when the authorities discovered it and he was jailed as a result. However, he was set free through the general amnesty which followed the Spanish revolution, which also ended the reign of Queen Isabel II. In spite of this, in 1869 General Sanz stated to Henna that it would be best if he left the Island. Henna moved to New York and studied medicine at Columbia University, earning his medical degree on 23 February 1872.[4] From New York, Henna continued to support the cause of independence for Puerto Rico.[5]

Career[edit]

In 1880, Henna founded, together with Drs. Chauveau, Deberceau, Muvial, and Ferrer, the New York City French Hospital at 330 West 30th street.[6] He became medical director of the institution and was a member of the medical faculty at Bellevue Hospital.[6]

Death[edit]

Henna died in Ponce on 2 February 1924.[7]

Legacy[edit]

A street in the town of Ponce is named after Dr. Julio H. Henna. It intersects Calle Dr. Biaggi, in the Extension Mariani sector of Barrio Canas Urbano.[7] A gold pendant believed to have belonged to Ponce area cacique Agueybana, and acquired by Dr. Henna, was displayed at the Gabinete de Lectura de Ponce around 1910, and is currently on display at the Smithsonian Institution.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Encyclopedia Puerto Rico. Archived 2016-03-03 at the Wayback Machine.
  2. ^ From Colonia to Community: The History of Puerto Ricans in New York City. Virginia Sánchez Korrol. Page 67. University of California Press. 1983. Retrieved 8 January 2014.
  3. ^ a b Lorenzo A. Balasquide. Medicos Notables del Antaño Ponceño. Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña. San Juan, Puerto Rico. 1984. Page 39.
  4. ^ Lorenzo A. Balasquide. Medicos Notables del Antaño Ponceño. Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña. San Juan, Puerto Rico. 1984. Page 40.
  5. ^ Las Fiestas Populares de Ponce y La Villa de Ponce. Ramon Marin. 1875. Ponce, Puerto Rico: Imprenta El Vapor. 72 pages. (Reprinted September 1994. San Juan, Puerto Rico: Editorial de la Universidad de Puerto Rico. 281 pages. Page 15.[Socorro Girón. "Ramon Marin y su Tiempo." (foreword)]) Retrieved 23 July 2012.
  6. ^ a b Lorenzo A. Balasquide. Medicos Notables del Antaño Ponceño. Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña. San Juan, Puerto Rico. 1984. Page 41.
  7. ^ a b Lorenzo A. Balasquide. Medicos Notables del Antaño Ponceño. Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña. San Juan, Puerto Rico. 1984. Page 42.
  8. ^ Ponce: Notas para su historia. Mariano Vidal Armstrong. Oficina Estatal de Conservacion Historica. San Juan, Puerto Rico. 1989. page 8. Accessed 19 February 2018.