Julius Patching

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Lifetime Olympic official, 91 y/o Julius (Judy) Patching, hands over to Jake Warcaba at the Stone of Remembrance, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory. Two Chinese flame attendants stand either side, assisting the two runners.

Julius Lockington "Judy" Patching, AO, OBE (4 January 1917 – 13 February 2009)[1] was an Australian Olympic icon, sports administrator, and businessman.

Early years[edit]

Patching started his involvement in sport as a track and field athlete in 1932 with the Geelong Guild Athletic Club and Athletics Victoria (formerly the Victorian Amateur Athletic Association). In 1933, he played a year of Australian Rules Football for Rosebud in the Mornington Peninsula Nepean Football League.[2] He was a keen hurdler and pentathlete, making the finals in both 110 and 440 yards hurdles in the 1946 Victorian championships.[3]

Patching joined the Royal Australian Navy in 1934 and served for 13 years, including World War II. He knew some of the sailors killed in the loss of HMAS Sydney II.[4]

Sport[edit]

Patching's Australian Olympic achievements include:

Patching was also:

Patching has contributed to the Victorian Olympic Council as:

  • 1971-1973 Honorary Secretary
  • 1974 Executive Member
  • 1975-1985 Chairman
  • 1986-1993 President

The VOC's "Julius Lockington Patching Sports Official of the Year Award" was inaugurated in 2008.[6]

Honours and awards[edit]

Patching has been honoured with Life Membership of:

Patching has also been awarded:

  • the Award of Merit from the Australian Athletic Union, now Athletics Australia
  • the Award of Merit from the Association of National Olympic Committees
  • the International Olympic Committee's Olympic Order (Silver)
  • the Australian Sports Medal
  • the first Oceania National Olympic committees (ONOC) Merit Award
  • Australia's recipient of the International Olympic Committee's Centenary of Olympic Games Award, and
  • Honorary Life Patron of the Olympians Club of Victoria, in 2003.

Patching's outstanding contribution to sport has also been honoured internationally with his being appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1970 and his being made an Officer of the Order of Australia in 1985.

Peter Norman[edit]

Patching was Chef de Mission for Australia during the famous 1968 Olympics Black Power salute. He resisted calls by conservatives in the media to punish Peter Norman, who wore a human rights badge on the dais. He cautioned Normal about the situation, and used the words "They're screaming out for your blood, so consider yourself severely reprimanded. Now, you got any tickets for the hockey today?" [7]

Social life[edit]

Patching was a long-time resident of Point Lonsdale, Victoria,[4] where his parents had lived and Patching grew up.

One of Patching's last official engagements in Geelong was his attendance at the Geelong Guild Athletic Club's Centenary Dinner in July 2008. Patching spoke at the dinner and along with fellow club Life Member, Mrs Patricia Agg, cut the club's centenary birthday cake.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Olympics body pays tribute to Patching". Australian Associated Press. SMH Online. 16 February 2009. Retrieved 16 February 2009. 
  2. ^ Top honour for a legend, Brody Viney, Frankston Independent, 12 March 2008, accessed 25 April 2008
  3. ^ Victorian Championships 1946, Athletics Victoria (archive), accessed 25 April 2008
  4. ^ a b Long-awaited find of HMAS Sydney tinged with sorrow for Point Lonsdale's Judy Patching, Danny Lannen, Geelong Advertiser, 18 March 2008, accessed 25 April 2008
  5. ^ Beijing 2008 Olympic Torch Relay Route and Torchbearer Locations, ACT Government, accessed 24 April 2008
  6. ^ Julius Lockington Patching Sports Official of the Year Award, inaugurated 2008, Victorian Olympic Committee, accessed 24 April 2008
  7. ^ Carlson, Michael (5 October 2006). "Peter Norman - Unlikely Australian participant in black athletes' Olympic civil rights protest". The Guardian. Retrieved 23 August 2016. 

External links[edit]