July 1930

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The following events occurred in July 1930:

July 1, 1930 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • At midnight, the Rhineland began month-long liberation celebrations with ringing bells, music and fireworks.[1][2]
  • In Chicago, Jack Zuta was questioned by police for his alleged involvement with the murder of journalist Jake Lingle. He was released that night and allowed a police escort when a rival gang drove up and fired on the policeman's car in an attempt to assassinate Zuta. A streetcar driver was killed and a night watchman wounded in the ensuing shootout on State Street.[3]
  • Born: Moustapha Akkad, Syrian-born filmmaker, in Aleppo (d. 2005)

July 2, 1930 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 3, 1930 (Thursday)[edit]

  • Otto Strasser formed the Kampfgemeinschaft Revolutionärer Nationalsozialisten (Combat League of Revolutionary National Socialists), more commonly known as the Black Front, as a left-wing splinter faction of the Nazi Party after his expulsion from that organization.[5]
  • Born: Carlos Kleiber, German-born Austrian conductor, in Berlin (d. 2004)

July 4, 1930 (Friday)[edit]

July 5, 1930 (Saturday)[edit]

July 6, 1930 (Sunday)[edit]

July 7, 1930 (Monday)[edit]

July 8, 1930 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 9, 1930 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 10, 1930 (Thursday)[edit]

  • France pledged to suspend the construction of warships for six months pending the possibility of a new naval conference with Italy.[15]

July 11, 1930 (Friday)[edit]

  • Germany's high court struck down prayers issued to Thuringian schools as unconstitutional because they manifested intolerance. The prayers were devised by Thuringian interior minister Wilhelm Frick and included lines such as, "I believe that thou wilt punish the betrayal of Germany and bless the actions of those who seek to free the Fatherland."[16][17]
  • Born: Harold Bloom, literary critic, in the Bronx, New York

July 12, 1930 (Saturday)[edit]

July 13, 1930 (Sunday)[edit]

July 14, 1930 (Monday)[edit]

July 15, 1930 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 16, 1930 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 17, 1930 (Thursday)[edit]

  • Al Singer knocked out Sammy Mandell in the first round at Yankee Stadium to win boxing's World Lightweight Title.[25]
  • British Labour MP John Beckett seized the ceremonial mace and tried to leave the chamber with it as a protest against Fenner Brockway being suspended for trying to force a debate about India. Beckett was intercepted and the mace was retrieved by the Serjeant-at-Arms, then Beckett was himself suspended from the House over the incident.[26][27]
  • Bert Patenaude of the United States became the first player to achieve a hat-trick in World Cup play, during a game against Paraguay. This feat went unnoticed until 2006 when research by FIFA concluded that one of Patenaude's three goals had been wrongly credited to teammate Tom Florie.[28]

July 18, 1930 (Friday)[edit]

  • The Reichstag, led by the Social Democratic Party, voted 236-221 to demand a revocation of Hindenburg's decrees of July 16. Hindenburg responded by dissolving the Reichstag and calling new elections for September 14, meaning that the Brüning government could use Article 48 to govern in the meantime without requiring parliamentary assent.[24][29]
  • The second Challenge International de Tourisme, an international touring aircraft contest, began in Berlin.

July 19, 1930 (Saturday)[edit]

  • 100 were injured in a train accident in Elizabeth, New Jersey.[30]
  • President Hindenburg began a "tour of triumph" in the liberated Rhineland. "The blackest days are over for our country", he told a gathering in Speyer.[31]
  • Died: Oku Yasukata, 83, Japanese general

July 20, 1930 (Sunday)[edit]

July 21, 1930 (Monday)[edit]

July 22, 1930 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • Celebrations of the Rhineland's liberation were marred by tragedy after a pontoon bridge collapsed in Koblenz, killing 38.[34][35]
  • Born: Jeremy Lloyd, actor and screenwriter, in Danbury, Essex, England (d. 2014)

July 23, 1930 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • The 6.5 magnitude Irpinia earthquake in southern Italy caused 1,404 deaths.[36]
  • President Hindenburg attended a memorial service for the 38 victims of the Koblenz bridge tragedy at the town hall and then cancelled the remaining stops of his Rhineland tour.[35]
  • Died: Glenn Curtiss, 52, American aviation pioneer

July 24, 1930 (Thursday)[edit]

July 25, 1930 (Friday)[edit]

July 26, 1930 (Saturday)[edit]

July 27, 1930 (Sunday)[edit]

July 28, 1930 (Monday)[edit]

July 29, 1930 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 30, 1930 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 31, 1930 (Thursday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (June 29, 1930). "6,000,000 Will 'Hoch' as Rhine is Liberated". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  2. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (July 1, 1930). "Liberty Bells Peak on Rhine Freed by Allies". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1.
  3. ^ "Gang Guns Blaze at Zuta in Loop; 1 Dead". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 2, 1930. p. 1.
  4. ^ Darrah, David (July 3, 1930). "Italy Strikes at U.S.; Boosts Tariff on Autos". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2.
  5. ^ "Tageseinträge für 3. Juli 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  6. ^ a b c d Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 395. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  7. ^ Speck, Eugene (July 5, 1930). "Helen Moody Retains Tennis Title; French Glory Fades". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 13.
  8. ^ "End Flight; 23 Days in Air". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 5, 1930. p. 1.
  9. ^ "Tageseinträge für 4. Juli 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  10. ^ Speck, Eugene (July 6, 1930). "Tilden is Tennis King Again! Tops Allison in Final". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. Part 2 p. 1.
  11. ^ "India Mob Tries to Visit Gandhi; 10 Hurt". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 7, 1930. p. 20.
  12. ^ Sage, Robert (July 8, 1930). "Conan Doyle's Family Awaits Spirit Message". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  13. ^ Lavery, Jason Edward (2006). The History of Finland. Greenwood Press. p. 98. ISBN 978-0-313-32837-4.
  14. ^ "Disasters – International". Pits of Cape Breton. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  15. ^ Wales, Henry (July 11, 1930). "France Halts Plans to Build New Warships". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  16. ^ "German Schools Forbidden to Use 'Kaiser' Prayer". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 12, 1930. p. 12.
  17. ^ Lamberti, Marjorie (2004). The Politics of Education: Teachers and School Reform in Weimar Germany. Bergahn Books. p. 206. ISBN 978-1-57181-299-5.
  18. ^ "Crowd Caught in Car Under River; 60 Die". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 13, 1930. p. 1.
  19. ^ "Conan Doyle's Wife Says His Spirit Talks". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 14, 1930. p. 1.
  20. ^ Root, Damon W. (April 5, 2011). "The Spook Racket". Reason Foundation. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  21. ^ Wales, Henry (July 15, 1930). "Italy Agrees to Naval Holiday for Six Months". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 10.
  22. ^ "Egyptian Riots". The Morning Bulletin. Rockhampton, Qld.: 6 July 17, 1930.
  23. ^ "British Jobless Still Climbing; Now 1,933,000". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 16, 1930. p. 2.
  24. ^ a b c Rossiter, Clinton (2009). Constitutional Dictatorship. Transaction Publishers. p. 51. ISBN 978-1-4128-2027-1.
  25. ^ "Al Singer". BoxRec. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  26. ^ Davies, Cecil (2004). The Plays of Ernst Toller: A Revaluation. Routledge. p. 386. ISBN 978-1-134-36178-6.
  27. ^ Bedini, Silvio A. (1997). The Mace and the Gavel: Symbols of Government in America, Volume 87, Part 4. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society. p. 4. ISBN 978-0-87169-874-2.
  28. ^ Glenday, Craig (2009). Guinness World Records 2010. Guinness World Records Ltd. p. 477. ISBN 978-0-553-59337-2.
  29. ^ "Germany is Put under Rule of Dictatorship". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 19, 1930. p. 1.
  30. ^ "Empty Auto Wrecks Train; 100 Injured". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 20, 1930. p. 1.
  31. ^ "Rhineland Dons Sunday Best for von Hindenburg". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 20, 1930. p. 5.
  32. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (July 22, 1930). "Ratify Pact to Cut Navies". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  33. ^ "Chicherin Resigns as Foreign Minister of Russia; in Ill Health". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 22, 1930. p. 8.
  34. ^ "Bridge Collapse Kills 40". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 23, 1930. p. 1.
  35. ^ a b Schultz, Sigrid (July 24, 1930). "Bridge Tragedy Ends Hindenburg Rhineland Tour". Chicago Daily Tribune: 7.
  36. ^ "Earthquakes with 1,000 or More Deaths 1900–2014". United States Geological Survey. Archived from the original on January 14, 2013. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  37. ^ "Commons Pass Naval Treaty; Goes to Lords". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 25, 1930. p. 3.
  38. ^ "Team Stolen Base Records & Team Caught Stealing Records". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  39. ^ "Tageseinträge für 27. Juli 1930". chroniknet. Retrieved April 18, 2015.
  40. ^ Mommsen, Hans (1996). The Rise and Fall of Weimar Democracy. University of North Carolina Press. p. 260. ISBN 978-0-8078-4721-3.
  41. ^ "Tornado Leaves Adrianople in Ruin; 20 Killed". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 29, 1930. p. 2.
  42. ^ Smith, George (July 29, 1930). "Premier King Party Beaten in Canada Vote". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  43. ^ Powell, John (July 30, 1930). "Chinese Reds Burn, Loot City of 500,000". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  44. ^ "British Peers Pass Navy Pact; Needs King's O.K.". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 30, 1930. p. 1.
  45. ^ Harmon, Jim (1992). Radio Mystery and Adventure and Its Appearances in Film, Television and Other Media. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 149. ISBN 978-0-7864-8508-6.
  46. ^ "The Shadow". Vintage Library. Retrieved April 18, 2015.