July 1932

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The following events occurred in July 1932:

July 1, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

July 2, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

July 3, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

July 4, 1932 (Monday)[edit]

July 5, 1932 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 6, 1932 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • At a Chicago hotel, Cubs shortstop Billy Jurges was shot by a scorned showgirl who intended to kill the ballplayer and then herself. Jurges suffered bullet wounds to a finger, rib and shoulder, but he only missed a few weeks of playing time and never pressed charges.[15]
  • Died: Kenneth Grahame, 73, British writer

July 7, 1932 (Thursday)[edit]

July 8, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

July 9, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

  • The Lausanne Conference ended with an agreement that Germany would make one final payment of 3 billion gold reichsmarks and then be free of reparations for all time.[22]
  • In Belgium, 2 were killed in mining towns during a day of rioting by miners striking for more pay and sympathetic labour elements.[23][24]
  • Born: Donald Rumsfeld, politician, in Chicago, Illinois

July 10, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

July 11, 1932 (Monday)[edit]

July 12, 1932 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 13, 1932 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • The British and French governments signed a pact of friendship at Lausanne.[29]
  • Three blocks in the west end of the famous Coney Island resort in New York were destroyed by a fire, doing an estimated $5 million in damage and leaving about 2,000 homeless.[30]
  • Amelia Earhart Putnam completed a transcontinental flight of the United States from Los Angeles to Newark in 19 hours 14 minutes and 40 seconds, a new record for a woman.[31]
  • Born: Per Nørgård, composer, in Gentofte, Denmark

July 14, 1932 (Thursday)[edit]

July 15, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

July 16, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

  • Rioting broke out in front of the White House by members of the Bonus Army who still refused to leave the capital. Contrary to tradition, President Hoover did not attend the final day of the 72nd Congress before adjourning until December due to safety concerns.[34]

July 17, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

July 18, 1932 (Monday)[edit]

July 19, 1932 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 20, 1932 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 21, 1932 (Thursday)[edit]

July 22, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

  • President Hoover signed the Federal Home Loan Bank Act.[45]
  • A diplomatic row broke out at the 28th Inter-Parliamentary Union in Geneva. Italian delegate Carlo Costamagna gave a speech extolling the accomplishments of Fascism in the field of justice when French representative Pierre Renaudel shouted, "What right have the Fascists, who don't know what a parliament is, to come here anyway! What right have they to talk about justice!" When the Italians demanded an apology, Renaudel responded, "What right have they got to ask me to apologize to the government that ordered the assassination of Matteotti?" A screaming match then broke out. Mussolini threatened to have Italy quit the Union, telling the League of Nations that the country could not be insulted in the building of which it shared the upkeep.[46]
  • Died: Errico Malatesta, 78, Italian anarchist; Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr., 65, American broadway impresario

July 23, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

July 24, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

  • In Havana, 9 were killed and 55 wounded in Cuban police raids on communist headquarters.[48]
  • Died: Hidaka Sōnojō, 84, Japanese admiral

July 25, 1932 (Monday)[edit]

  • The Soviet Union signed non-aggression pacts with Estonia, Finland and Poland.[29]
  • The German Supreme Court declined Prussia's request for an injunction restraining Chancellor Franz von Papen from taking over the government.[49]
  • Paul Gorguloff went on trial for the assassination of French President Paul Doumer, claiming he had been possessed by a demon as part of an insanity defense.[50][51]
  • Died: Charles Mills Gayley, 74, American professor

July 26, 1932 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 27, 1932 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 28, 1932 (Thursday)[edit]

  • President Hoover ordered Washington police to evict the Bonus Army squatters. Some of them reacted by throwing bricks, and in one skirmish two veterans were shot.[56] Hoover now called on the military, and the Secretary of War ordered Army Chief of Staff Douglas MacArthur to "surround the affected area and clear it without delay."[44] Infantry, cavalry and tanks were deployed and by 8:00 p.m. the protestors had been pushed across the Anacostia River with tear gas. The most controversial moment of the affair ensued an hour later, as MacArthur disobeyed orders and sent the military across the bridge, driving away the veterans and setting fire to their camp. The entire episode became a public relations disaster for the Hoover Administration as the military's actions were seen as overly harsh.[44][56]
  • Two days before the beginning of the Summer Olympics, Finnish running star Paavo Nurmi was suspended by the IAAF for violating his amateur status by accepting renumeration in excess of his expenses to run five exhibition races in Germany during September and October 1931.[57]
  • The horror film White Zombie was released.
  • Born: Jacob Neusner, scholar of Judaism, in Hartford, Connecticut

July 29, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

  • In Hungary, two communist leaders were court-martialed and hanged on the same day, despite international pleas for clemency due to the speed of the trial and lack of evidence that they were plotting to overthrow the political and social order.[58]
  • Born: Nancy Kassebaum, politician, in Topeka, Kansas

July 30, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

July 31, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (July 2, 1932). "Pick Roosevelt; Here Today". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  2. ^ Speck, Eugene (July 2, 1932). "Helen M. Beats Helen J. With Ease for Title". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 15.
  3. ^ Peters, Gerbhard; Woolley, John T. (July 2, 1932). "Address Accepting the Presidential Nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  4. ^ "Tageseinträge für 2. Juli 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  5. ^ Pettey, Tom (July 3, 1932). "Curtis Guilty in Lindy Case, Jury's Verdict". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  6. ^ Falzini, Mark W. (2008). Their Fifteen Minutes: Biographical Sketches of the Lindbergh Case. Bloomington, Indiana: iUniverse. p. 78. ISBN 978-0-595-52253-8.
  7. ^ Speck, Eugene (July 3, 1932). "Vines Blasts Way to Title at Wimbledon". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. Part 2 p. 5.
  8. ^ Golden, Eve (2013). John Gilbert: The Last of the Silent Film Stars. The University Press of Kentucky. p. 235. ISBN 978-0-8131-4162-6.
  9. ^ "Harlow-Bern Wedding Called Ideal Romance". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 4, 1932. p. 4.
  10. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (July 4, 1932). "Republicans and Hitlerites Begin Scrap for Votes". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 4.
  11. ^ "German Airmen Found Near Seaplane Alive, But Demented". The Mercury. Hobart: 7. July 5, 1932.
  12. ^ Steele, John (July 5, 1932). "British Strike at Irish with a 100% Tariff". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 6.
  13. ^ Zingg, Paul J. (1994). Runs, Hits, and an Era: The Pacific Coast League, 1903–58. University of Illinois Press. p. 79. ISBN 978-0-252-06402-9.
  14. ^ Tucker, Spencer C. (2010). A Global Chronology of Conflict: From the Ancient World to the Modern Middle East. ABC-CLIO. p. 1852. ISBN 978-1-85109-672-5.
  15. ^ Geiisler Jr., Billy. "Billy Jurges". SABR Baseball Biography Project. Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  16. ^ "Prométhée 7 juillet 1932". Histoire Maritime. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  17. ^ a b c "1932". Music And History. Archived from the original on April 1, 2015. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  18. ^ "The Great Depression and Dow Jones Industrial Average". Generational Dynamics. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  19. ^ "Prices of Stocks are Driven Down by Bear Raiders". Chicago Daily Tribune. June 12, 1930. p. 1.
  20. ^ Steele, John (July 9, 1932). "Mountbatten's Wife Wins Libel Suit in Scandal". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  21. ^ a b c Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 415. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  22. ^ Allen, Jay (July 10, 1932). "Reveal 'Joker' in Debt Pact". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  23. ^ House, Ann Somers (July 10, 1932). "Strike Riots Spread Over Belgium; 2 Die". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  24. ^ "Tageseinträge für 9. Juli 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  25. ^ Schneider, Russell (2001). The Cleveland Indians Encyclopedia, 2nd Ed. Sports Publishing LLC. p. 376. ISBN 978-1-58261-376-5.
  26. ^ "Tageseinträge für 11. Juli 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  27. ^ a b Bernhardt, Rudolf (1981). Decisions of International Courts and Tribunals and International Arbitrations, Volume 2. North-Holland Publishing Company. pp. 83–84. ISBN 978-1-4832-5702-0.
  28. ^ Curran, Hugh (July 13, 1932). "Irish Turn Down Amended Bill on Oath to King". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 10.
  29. ^ a b c d "Chronology 1932". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  30. ^ "Four Inquiries Started in Coney Island Fire Disaster; Low Water Pressure Hit". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 14, 1932. pp. 1, 8.
  31. ^ "Amelia Putnam Sets Marks for Women Flyers". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 14, 1932. p. 3.
  32. ^ "De Valera Sees British Premier; Two Deadlocked". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 16, 1932. p. 3.
  33. ^ "1932". Grauman's Chinese. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  34. ^ "Veterans Riot; White House Gates Locked". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 17, 1932. p. 1.
  35. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (July 18, 1932). "Fire on Hitler 'Army' Parade; Hundreds Hurt". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  36. ^ Rubin, Barry; Rubin, Judith Culp (2015). Chronologies of Modern Terrorism. Routledge. p. 30. ISBN 978-1-317-47465-4.
  37. ^ "Germany Bans Parades as 13 Die in Rioting". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 18, 1932. p. 1.
  38. ^ Knowles, Arthur; Beech, Graham (2005). The Bluebird Years: Donald Campbell and the Pursuit of Speed. Wilmslow: Sigma Press. p. 22. ISBN 978-1-85058-766-8.
  39. ^ "Lambeth Bridge Opened by the King". The Sydney Morning Herald. Sydney: 9. July 21, 1932.
  40. ^ Caldwell, Peter C. (1997). Popular Sovereignty and the Crisis of German Constitutional Law: The Theory & Practice of Weimar Constitutionalism. Duke University Press. p. 8. ISBN 978-0-8223-1988-7.
  41. ^ "Italy – Political Sensation – Five Ministers Resign". The Sydney Morning Herald. Sydney: 9. July 21, 1932.
  42. ^ Steele, John (July 22, 1932). "British Empire Launches War on Depression". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  43. ^ Olson, James S.; Mendoza, Abraham O. (2015). American Economic History: A Dictionary and Chronology. ABC-CLIO, LLC. p. 193. ISBN 978-1-61069-698-2.
  44. ^ a b c Killigrew, John. "The Army and the Bonus Incident." MacArthur and the American Century: A Reader. Ed. William M. Leary. University of Nebraska Press, 2001. p. 35–37. ISBN 978-0-8032-8020-5.
  45. ^ "Hoover Praises Home Loan Bill as He Signs It". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 23, 1932. p. 1.
  46. ^ Allen, Jay (July 23, 1932). "French Shout, "Assassins!" at Italians; Riot". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  47. ^ Allen, Jay (July 24, 1932). "Disarm Parley Ends; 10 States Hoot Results". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  48. ^ "Nine Slain, 55 Hurt as Cuban Cops Raid Reds". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 25, 1932. p. 1.
  49. ^ "Prussia Loses Fight to End Dictatorship". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 25, 1932. p. 1.
  50. ^ Taylor, Edmond (July 26, 1932). "Demon in Me Slew Doumer, Assassin Cries". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  51. ^ Michel, Pascal (August 8, 2008). "Paul Gorguloff: l'assassin du Président Paul Doumer". Scene de Crime. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  52. ^ "Tageseinträge für 26. Juli 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  53. ^ "School Ship Upset; 69 Dead". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 27, 1932. p. 1.
  54. ^ "High Pockets Kelly 1932 Batting Gamelogs". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  55. ^ Taylor, Edmond (July 28, 1932). "France Orders Guillotine for Doumer Slayer". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3.
  56. ^ a b "Hoover & the Depression: The Bonus Army". Authentic History. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  57. ^ Martin, David E.; Gynn, Roger W. H. (2000). The Olympic Marathon. Human Kinetics. p. 149. ISBN 978-0-88011-969-6.
  58. ^ Shirer, William (July 30, 1932). "2 Hungarian Reds Hanged; Paris Protests". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  59. ^ Shaffer, George (July 31, 1932). "105,000 Cheer Opening of Olympic Games". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. Part 2, p. 1.
  60. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (August 1, 1932). "Hitler Fails to Win Helm". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  61. ^ Liebman, Ronald G. "Cleveland's Contrasting Historic Games in 1932". Research Journals Archive. Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved May 28, 2015.