July 1938

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The following events occurred in July 1938:

July 1, 1938 (Friday)[edit]

July 2, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

July 3, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

July 4, 1938 (Monday)[edit]

July 5, 1938 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • 6 Jews were killed in another day of violence in Palestine.[9]
  • Turkey sent troops into the Sanjak of Alexandretta to oversee the referendum.[4]
  • Goiânia Esporte Clube was founded in Brazil.

July 6, 1938 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 7, 1938 (Thursday)[edit]

  • A bomb thrown into a crowd of Arabs in Jerusalem killed a man and wounded two others. The British sent two warships and an additional brigade to the region.[11]
  • An exhibition of art banned in Germany as "degenerate" opened in London, with paintings by Max Beckmann, Wassily Kandinsky and others.[6]

July 8, 1938 (Friday)[edit]

July 9, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

July 10, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Hitler opened the Great Exhibition of German Art in Munich with a speech attacking the London exhibition of banned German art, calling modern artists "cultural Neanderthalers" and "lamentable unfortunates who plainly suffer from defective sight."[6][15][16]
  • Associação Olímpica de Itabaiana was founded in Brazil.
  • Born: Tura Satana, actress, in Hokkaido, Japan (d. 2011)

July 11, 1938 (Monday)[edit]

  • Nazi Germany banned Jews from health spas.[17]

July 12, 1938 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 13, 1938 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 14, 1938 (Thursday)[edit]

July 15, 1938 (Friday)[edit]

July 16, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

July 17, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

July 18, 1938 (Monday)[edit]

July 19, 1938 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 20, 1938 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 21, 1938 (Thursday)[edit]

July 22, 1938 (Friday)[edit]

July 23, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

July 24, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

July 25, 1938 (Monday)[edit]

July 26, 1938 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 27, 1938 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 28, 1938 (Thursday)[edit]

July 29, 1938 (Friday)[edit]

July 30, 1938 (Saturday)[edit]

July 31, 1938 (Sunday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Matthäus, Jürgen; Roseman, Mark (2010). Jewish Responses to Persecution: 1933–1938. AltaMira Press. p. 449. ISBN 978-0-7591-1910-9.
  2. ^ "Budge Defeats Austin; Retains Wimbledon Title". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 2, 1938. p. 11.
  3. ^ "Helen Moody Wins 8th Title at Wimbledon". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 3, 1938. p. 1.
  4. ^ a b c d e "Chronology 1938". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  5. ^ "Tageseinträge für 3. Juli 1938". chroniknet. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  6. ^ a b c d e f Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. pp. 498–499. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  7. ^ "Mussolini Bans Wheat Grown in Big Democracies". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 5, 1938. p. 11.
  8. ^ "Cuba Adopts Roosevelt as Son at July 4 Fete". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 5, 1938. p. 11.
  9. ^ "6 Jews Killed In Arab Attack". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 5, 1938. p. 1.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g "1938". MusicAndHistory. Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  11. ^ "Rush Warships To Haifa Riots". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 7, 1938. p. 1.
  12. ^ Hanson, Patricia King, ed. (1993). The American Film Institute Catalog of Motion Pictures Produced in the United States: Feature Films, 1931–1940. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. p. 29. ISBN 0-520-07908-6.
  13. ^ "Further Curb on Jews". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 9, 1938. p. 1.
  14. ^ "Specify Leads Derby Runners". Ogden Standard-Examiner. Ogden, Utah: 9. July 10, 1938.
  15. ^ "Hitler Assails Art of 1938 as Culture of Neanderthal Age". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 11, 1938. p. 7.
  16. ^ "Hitler Opens Great Exhibition of German Art in Munich". Skepticism.org. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  17. ^ "Antisemitic Legislation 1933–1939". Holocaust Encyclopedia. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  18. ^ Swopes, Bryan (July 14, 2015). "10-14 July 1938". This Day in Aviation History. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  19. ^ "Tageseinträge für 15. Juli 1938". chroniknet. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  20. ^ "City Thunders Tribute for Hughes". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. July 15, 1938. p. 1.
  21. ^ "Spanish Rebels Cross Valencia Province Border". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 17, 1938. p. 7.
  22. ^ a b Collins, Sandra. "Tokyo/Helsinki 1940." Encyclopedia of the Mordern Olympic Movement. Ed. John E. Findling and Kimberley D. Pelle. Greenwood Publishing, 2004. p. 120–121. ISBN 978-0-313-32278-5.
  23. ^ "Seabiscuit Wins and Sets Record in $50,000 Race". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 17, 1938. p. Part 2, p. 1.
  24. ^ a b ""Wrong Way" Corrigan crosses the Atlantic". History. A&E Networks. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  25. ^ Cortada, James W., ed. (1982). Historical Dictionary of the Spanish Civil War, 1936–1939. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. p. 512. ISBN 0-313-22054-9.
  26. ^ McNeese, Tim (2006). Salvador Dali. Chelsea House. p. 89. ISBN 978-1-4381-0691-5.
  27. ^ "Joan Crawford and Franchot Tone Separate". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 20, 1938. p. 1.
  28. ^ Day, Donald (July 22, 1938). "Japan Defied by Red Army". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  29. ^ IJN Minelayer YAEYAMA: Tabular Record of Movement
  30. ^ "Flyer Falls in Crowd; 34 Die". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 25, 1938. p. 1.
  31. ^ Simkin, John (2014). "Spanish Civil War: Chronology". Spartacus Educational. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  32. ^ "45 Slain in New Holy Land Terror". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 26, 1938. p. 1.
  33. ^ "Murderers Glorified". The West Australian. Perth. July 26, 1938. p. 15.
  34. ^ "Italians Cool to Fascist Press Drive on Jews". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 27, 1938. p. 6.
  35. ^ "British Vessel Sinks After 3d Raid by Rebels". Chicago Daily Tribune. July 28, 1938. p. 5.
  36. ^ "Tageseinträge für 29. Juli 1938". chroniknet. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  37. ^ Flink, James J. (1990). The Automobile Age. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. p. 113. ISBN 978-0-262-56055-9.
  38. ^ "60 Dead; 80 Injured in Train Crash". The Argus. Melbourne. August 1, 1938. p. 1.