July 1945

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The following events occurred in July 1945:

July 1, 1945 (Sunday)[edit]

July 2, 1945 (Monday)[edit]

  • Only 200,000 essential workers were left in Tokyo due to mass evacuations.[2]
  • The submarine USS Barb fired rockets on Kaihyo Island near Sakhalin, becoming the first American underwater craft to fire rockets in shore bombardment.[3]

July 3, 1945 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 4, 1945 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • General Douglas MacArthur announced that the Philippines had been completely liberated.[3]
  • About 500 Canadian troops in Aldershot, England rioted in protest of the delay in sending them home.[5]

July 5, 1945 (Thursday)[edit]

July 6, 1945 (Friday)[edit]

  • Allied forces held a victory parade in Berlin.[1]
  • Norway announced that it had declared war on Japan on December 7, 1941.[7]
  • Frank Forde became 15th Prime Minister of Australia one day after John Curtin's death in office.
  • Born: Burt Ward, television actor and activist, in Los Angeles, California.
  • MICHAEL I, King of Romania. Awarded with the rarest, most valuable and the highest military award of the Soviet Union - Order of Victory (Орден "Победa").

July 7, 1945 (Saturday)[edit]

July 8, 1945 (Sunday)[edit]

July 9, 1945 (Monday)[edit]

July 10, 1945 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 11, 1945 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 12, 1945 (Thursday)[edit]

July 13, 1945 (Friday)[edit]

  • The Berlin municipal council officially confiscated all property held by members of the Nazi Party.[9]
  • The American government admitted responsibility for the April 1 sinking of the Japanese hospital ship Awa Maru, claiming it was an error.[9]
  • Died: Alla Nazimova, 66, Russian actress (coronary thrombosis)

July 14, 1945 (Saturday)[edit]

  • Italy declared war on Japan effective the next day.[7]
  • Japanese destroyer Tachibana was bombed and sunk in Hakodate Bay by U.S. Navy aircraft.
  • The Simla Conference on the future of Indian government ended in failure.[4]
  • The ban on Allied troops fraternizing with German women was lifted.[1]

July 15, 1945 (Sunday)[edit]

July 16, 1945 (Monday)[edit]

July 17, 1945 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 18, 1945 (Wednesday)[edit]

July 19, 1945 (Thursday)[edit]

July 20, 1945 (Friday)[edit]

July 21, 1945 (Saturday)[edit]

  • The Battle of Palikpapan ended in Allied victory.
  • The United States government warned that American patience was "rapidly running out" and told Japan to surrender unconditionally or face "virtual destruction".[11]
  • Born: John Lowe, professional darts player, in New Tupton, Derbyshire, England

July 22, 1945 (Sunday)[edit]

  • American, British and Russian officials agreed to allow their respective military police forces to move freely throughout all occupation zones of Berlin to thwart the city's runaway black market trade.[12]
  • Art treasures worth an estimated $500 million U.S. that had been looted by the Germans during the war were returned to two galleries in Florence, Italy.[13]

July 23, 1945 (Monday)[edit]

July 24, 1945 (Tuesday)[edit]

July 25, 1945 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • The Potsdam Conference adjourned temporarily so the British delegation could return to England to hear the election results.[14]
  • The U.S. government announced the end of all organized Japanese resistance on Mindanao.[4]
  • Philippe Pétain caused an uproar when he spoke for the first time during his trial, claiming that he was deaf and had not heard a thing that had been said in court up to that time. Many in the courtroom did not believe him, pointing out that he had frequently appeared to be listening attentively and fidgeted the most when serious charges were being made against him.[15]

July 26, 1945 (Thursday)[edit]

July 27, 1945 (Friday)[edit]

July 28, 1945 (Saturday)[edit]

July 29, 1945 (Sunday)[edit]

July 30, 1945 (Monday)[edit]

July 31, 1945 (Tuesday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 628. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  2. ^ a b Davidson, Edward; Manning, Dale (1999). Chronology of World War Two. London: Cassell & Co. pp. 251–252. ISBN 0-304-35309-4. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Conflict Timeline, July 2-11 1945". OnWar.com. Retrieved March 28, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c "1945". MusicAndHistory.com. Archived from the original on September 23, 2013. Retrieved March 28, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b "1945". World War II Database. Retrieved March 28, 2016. 
  6. ^ "Churchill Expected to Return to Hear Results of Election". Chicago Daily Tribune. Chicago: Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. July 23, 1945. 
  7. ^ a b Doody, Richard. "A Timeline of Diplomatic Ruptures, Unannounced Invasions, Declarations of War, Armistices and Surrenders". The World at War. Retrieved March 28, 2016. 
  8. ^ "Soviets agree to hand over power in West Berlin". History. A&E Networks. Retrieved March 28, 2016. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f "Conflict Timeline, July 12-21 1945". OnWar.com. Retrieved March 28, 2016. 
  10. ^ Yust, Walter, ed. (1946). 1946 Britannica Book of the Year. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. p. 9. 
  11. ^ "Surrender at Once, Japan Warned by U.S.". Brooklyn Eagle. Brooklyn: 1. July 22, 1945. 
  12. ^ "Allies to Let MPs Arrest Profiteers in Any Berlin Zone". Chicago Daily Tribune. Chicago: Chicago Daily Tribune: 2. July 23, 1945. 
  13. ^ "500 Million Art Loot Returned to Florence". Chicago Daily Tribune. Chicago: Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. July 23, 1945. 
  14. ^ a b c d "Conflict Timeline, July 22-31 1945". OnWar.com. Retrieved March 28, 2016. 
  15. ^ Sage, Robert (July 26, 1945). "Petain Claims He's Too Deaf to Hear Trial". Chicago Daily Tribune. Chicago: 1. 
  16. ^ "Churchill Defeated". Brooklyn Eagle. Brooklyn: 1. July 26, 1945. 
  17. ^ Mitchell, Greg (July 27, 2013). "Countdown to Hiroshima, for July 27, 1945: Japan Ignores Ultimatum". Huffington Post. Retrieved March 28, 2016. 
  18. ^ "Ford, 82 Today, Sees Greatest Prosperity Era". Chicago Daily Tribune. Chicago: Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. July 30, 1945. 
  19. ^ Mitchell, Greg (July 31, 2013). "Countdown to Hiroshima, for July 31, 1945: Top Truman Aide Opposes Use of Bomb". Huffington Post. Retrieved March 28, 2016.