JumpSport

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JumpSport, Inc.
Private
IndustrySporting goods manufacturer
PredecessorJumpSport, LLC
FoundedSaratoga, California (May 1, 1998 (1998-05-01))
Founder
Headquarters,
United States
Area served
Worldwide
ProductsTrampolines
Revenue
  • US$13 million (2007)
Number of employees
  • 15 (2007)
Websitejumpsport.com
Footnotes / references
[1][2]

JumpSport, Inc. is a manufacturer of recreational trampolines and accessories that are distributed worldwide. JumpSport markets and sells a patented trampoline safety net enclosure which was invented by one of the company's founders, Mark Publicover.

History[edit]

The company was founded in January 1997 by Mark Publicover, his wife, Valerie, and then board chairman Byron Lewis Bertsch[3][4][5][6] as a California limited liability company that was subsequently merged into the JumpSport California corporation created in May 1998.[7][8] Originally they created the company to market the safety net enclosure system which Publicover had patented.[9] JumpSport initially had its trampolines manufactured by Hedstrom out of Bedford, PA but, due to competitive pressures, they transitioned to overseas production in the 2000s. The company distributes to multiple retailers nationally.[10]

In 2000, JumpSport received funding from the Band of Angels.[11] Also in 2000, the company become one of 35 founding members of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) "Product Safety Circle".[12][13]

In 2007, JumpSport's 15 employee business had $13 million in sales and represented less than 1% of the market for safety net enclosures.[1][10][14]

JumpSport expanded their line to include fitness trampolines in 2008.[12] In 2011, they extended into the age 2–5 market with the introduction of the "iBounce" trampoline with integrated iPad/tablet holder.[15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Mina Kimes (April 28, 2008). "Is your idea safe?". Fortune. Retrieved May 31, 2014. Publicover believes that copycats owe his business, which had sales of $13 million last year, $50 million. The CEO anticipates spending the next ten years cobbling together lawsuits and waiting for the courts to call up his case numbers.
  2. ^ "Jumpsport, Inc. in Saratoga, CA - Bizapedia Profile". July 22, 2013. Retrieved June 1, 2014. Jumpsport, Inc. is a California Corporation filed on May 1, 1998.
  3. ^ "Byron L. Bertsch, Inventor, San Jose, CA". PatentBuddy. Retrieved June 3, 2014. Jun 19, 1998 Earliest Filing ... JUMPSPORT, INC.
  4. ^ "Byron Bertsch - JumpSport, Inc. - Joesdata.com". Joe's Data. Retrieved June 3, 2014. Byron Bertsch work as an Chairman of the Board for Jumpsport, Inc.
  5. ^ "Byron Bertsch Obituary – California – Tributes.com". Tributes.com. Retrieved June 3, 2014. Byron was born on September 11, 1948 and passed away on Wednesday, April 14, 2010. Byron was a resident of California.
  6. ^ "The Mustang world has lost a Great Guy". Mustang Owner's Club. April 15, 2010. Retrieved June 3, 2014. Byron Bertsch 11/9/48 - 14/4/10 ... was the driving force behind the creation of Total Control Products.
  7. ^ "Jumpsport, LLC in Saratoga, CA – Bizapedia Profile". April 17, 2014. Retrieved June 1, 2014. Jumpsport, LLC is a California Domestic Limited-Liability Company filed on January 30, 1997.
  8. ^ "JumpSport, Inc. Saratoga, CA – Wysk Company Profile". May 27, 2014. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
  9. ^ US 6053845, Publicover, Mark W., "Trampoline or the like with enclosure", published June 19, 1998, issued April 25, 2000 
  10. ^ a b Lawrence J. Udell. "Going From Idea to Inc – Turning an Invention Into a Business". California Invention Center. Retrieved May 31, 2014.
  11. ^ "Trampoline Safety Company Receives Startup Funds" (Press release). JumpSport. September 19, 2000. Retrieved May 31, 2014.
  12. ^ a b "Trampoline Safety – Our Story at JumpSport". JumpSport. Retrieved May 31, 2014.
  13. ^ "The Product Safety Circle". Consumer Product Safety Commission. 2000. Archived from the original on October 17, 2000.
  14. ^ J. Michael Kennedy (October 1, 2002). "Besides a Great Idea, an Inventor Can Use a Patent on Patience". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved May 31, 2014. Five years after building his prototype that surrounds a trampoline with netting, Publicover finally turned a profit this year, but not before going through a series of setbacks and more than $1 million, much of that his own money. Now, he sells about 800 trampoline enclosures a day. They sell at various retailers and over the Internet at about $200 apiece. The downside is that he is now embroiled in a lawsuit against companies with similar products.
  15. ^ "Winner - National Parenting Center Spring 2012 Seal of Approval". Retrieved May 31, 2014.

External links[edit]