June Hutton

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June Hutton (née June Marvel Cowan; August 11, 1919 Bloomington, Illinois – May 2, 1973 Encino, Los Angeles) was an American actress and vocalist, popular with big bands during the 1940s. She was the younger sister of vocalist Ina Ray Hutton.

Early years[edit]

Hutton's parents were Marvel Svea Williams and Odie Daniel Cowan. June and her older sister, Ina Ray Hutton, both grew up to be entertainers and performers during the Big Band era.

Growing up in Chicago, Hutton attended Hyde Park High School, as did her older sister, Ina. While attending high school, she worked in the dress department at Marshall Fields department store. After graduating, she quit her job and pursued her singing career.

Career[edit]

In her early days, she sang at the "Astor Roof" in New York City. After singing with her sister's orchestra in 1938, she was part of the Winston Trio, the Quintones, and the Sande Williams Band. She appeared with the Quintones in Hi Ya, Gentlemen, a failed musical with boxer Max Baer. In 1941, she became the female vocalist for the Stardusters, the singing group of Charlie Spivak & His Orchestra.[1]

After Jo Stafford left The Pied Pipers in 1944, Hutton replaced her, joining the group in May.[2] She performed with the Pied Pipers for six years, recording several hit records including the song "Dream." In 1950, Hutton left the Pied Pipers, going solo on Decca Records. (However, the trade publication Billboard reported in its December 10, 1949, issue that Hutton had already left the Pied Pipers and signed with Decca Records.[3])

Hutton's post-Pipers solo career included her debut in New York at the Copacabana nightclub November 16, 1950.[4]

In 1951, Hutton married Axel Stordahl, a musical arranger for Tommy Dorsey. In 1952, she went to Capitol Records, backed by an orchestra led by her husband. She recorded three hit records at Capitol: "Say You're Mine Again", "No Stone Unturned", and "For the First Time".

Later years[edit]

Stordahl died in 1963,[5] and Hutton married actor Kenneth Tobey in 1968. They divorced in 1972. Hutton died on May 2, 1973, at the age of 52. She is buried beside Stordahl at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, in Los Angeles.

Partial discography[edit]

  • If You've Got the Money I've Got the Time/Tear Drops From My Eyes (1950, Decca #27329 with the Lee Gordon Singers.)[6]
  • My Sweetie Went Away/More Than I Should (1950, Decca 27061)[7]
  • All the Bees Are Buzzin' Round My Honey/For You, My Love (1950, Decca 24056)[8]
  • Nothing/Bye, Honey, Bye-Bye (1951 Decca 27833)[9]
  • Keep It a Secret/I Miss You So (1952, Capitol 2268)[10]
  • For the First Time/If It's the Last Thing I Do (1953, Capitol 2667)[11]
  • By the Light of the Silvery Moon (1953 Capitol with Gordon MacRae)[12]
  • Full Dimensional Sound -- A Study in High Fidelity (1953 Capitol) Hutton was one of several artists included on a long-playing album to "demonstrate to audiophiles the full range and capabilities of sound reproducing systems."[13]
  • The Lights of Home/You Are My Love (1953 Capitol 2369)[14]
  • I Had a Little Too Much to Dream Last Night/Song of the Sleigh Bells (1953 Capitol 2318)[15]
  • Coney Island Boat/Open Your Arms (1954 Capitol 2784)[16]
  • Gee/Too Little Time (1954 Capitol 2727)[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "June Hutton". The Circleville Herald. November 26, 1943. p. 7. Retrieved August 15, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  2. ^ "Pied Pipers Down Beat Award Winners". Santa Cruz Sentinel. September 20, 1947. p. 22. Retrieved August 15, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  3. ^ "Hutton Inks Pact With Decca; Signs Gastel Management" (PDF). Billboard. December 10, 1949. p. 15. Retrieved 16 August 2015. 
  4. ^ "Music as Written: New York" (PDF). Billboard. November 11, 1950. p. 42. Retrieved 16 August 2015. 
  5. ^ "Music Arranger Dies". Daily Independent Journal. August 31, 1963. p. 2. Retrieved August 15, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  6. ^ "(Decca Records advertisement)" (PDF). Billboard. December 30, 1950. p. 7. Retrieved 16 August 2015. 
  7. ^ "Record Reviews" (PDF). Billboard. July 8, 1950. p. 114. Retrieved 16 August 2015. 
  8. ^ "Record Reviews" (PDF). Billboard. February 18, 1950. p. 32. Retrieved 16 August 2015. 
  9. ^ "Record Reviews" (PDF). Billboard. November 10, 1951. p. 94. Retrieved 16 August 2015. 
  10. ^ "Reviews of This Week's New Records: Popular" (PDF). Billboard. November 15, 1952. p. 48. Retrieved 17 August 2015. 
  11. ^ "Popular Record Reviews" (PDF). Billboard. December 12, 1953. p. 40. Retrieved 17 August 2015. 
  12. ^ "By the Light of the Silvery Moon". Tucson Daily Citizen. June 27, 1953. p. 31. Retrieved August 15, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication - free to read
  13. ^ "Capitol Hi-Fi Album Release" (PDF). Billboard. September 26, 1953. pp. 21, 54. Retrieved 17 August 2015. 
  14. ^ "Buyboard" (PDF). Billboard. February 21, 1953. p. 37. Retrieved 18 August 2015. 
  15. ^ "Reviews of This Week's New Records" (PDF). Billboard. January 3, 1953. p. 24. Retrieved 18 August 2015. 
  16. ^ "Buyboard" (PDF). Billboard. April 24, 1954. p. 33. Retrieved 18 August 2015. 
  17. ^ "Buyboard" (PDF). Billboard. February 20, 1954. p. 31. Retrieved 18 August 2015. 

General references

External links[edit]