Junonia oenone

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Junonia oenone
Blue pansy (Junonia oenone).jpg
Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda
Blue pansy (Junonia oenone) underside.jpg
Kakum, Ghana
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Nymphalidae
Genus: Junonia
Species: J. oenone
Binomial name
Junonia oenone
(Linnaeus, 1758)[1]
Synonyms
  • Papilio oenone Linnaeus, 1758
  • Papilio clelia Cramer, [1775]
  • Vanessa epiclelia Boisduval, 1833
  • Precis clelia ab. subepiclelia Strand, 1911
  • Precis clelia ab. triocellata Strand, 1911
  • Precis clelia ab. vosseleriana Strand, 1911
  • Precis clelia ab. viridata Strand, 1911
  • Precis clelia ab. subvirilis Strand, 1912
  • Precis clelia ab. bipupillata Strand, 1912
  • Precis clelia ab. posterior Strand, 1912
  • Precis clelia ab. subtriocellata Strand, 1912
  • Precis clelia ab. subbipupillata Strand, 1912
  • Precis clelia ab. virilis Strand, 1912
  • Precis clelia ab. caeruleffulgiens Heslop, 1962

Junonia oenone, the blue pansy or dark blue pansy, is a Nymphalid butterfly native to Africa.[2][3] "Blue pansy" is also used in India to describe Junonia orithya.[4]

Subspecies[edit]

Description[edit]

The wingspan is 40–52 mm.[5] The upper surface of the forewings is black with white markings towards the apex. The upper surface of the hindwings is black with white markings on the outer edge, and a characteristic large metallic-blue spot. This blue spot is smaller and more a dull purple in females.[3] The underside of the forewings is brown with white markings corresponding to those on the upper surface. The under surface of the hindwings is almost uniform brown.

Larval food plants[edit]

The larvae feed on Adhatoda densiflora,[3] Mackaya bella, Justicia natalensis and Asystasia (A. gangetica[3]), Isoglossa, Pualowilhelmia and Ruella species.[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Junonia Hübner, [1819]" at Markku Savela's Lepidoptera and Some Other Life Forms
  2. ^ South African Butterfly Conservation Assessment: http://sabca.adu.org.za/, retrieved 28 July 2010.
  3. ^ a b c d Williams, M. (1994). Butterflies of Southern Africa; A Field Guide. ISBN 1-86812-516-5.
  4. ^ a b c "Junonia Hübner, [1819]" at Markku Savela's Lepidoptera and Some Other Life Forms
  5. ^ a b Woodhall, Steve (2005). Field Guide to Butterflies of South Africa. Cape Town, South Africa: Struik. ISBN 978-1-86872-724-7. 
  6. ^ Larsen, Torben B. (1996). The Butterflies of Kenya and Their Natural History.