Jurassic Park

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Jurassic Park
Jurassic Park (franchise logo).png
The first film's logo depicting the skeleton of a Tyrannosaurus
Created by
Original work
Jurassic Park (novel; 1990)

Jurassic Park (film; 1993)

Owner
Years1990–present
Print publications
Novel(s)
Short stories
Films and television
Film(s)
Short film(s)
Animated seriesJurassic World Camp Cretaceous (2020–2022)
Theatrical presentations
Play(s)Jurassic World Live (2019)
Games
TraditionalJurassic World: The Legacy of Isla Nublar
Video game(s)List of video games
Audio
Soundtrack(s)
Miscellaneous
Toy(s)List of toys and see Lego Jurassic World
Theme park attraction(s)
Character(s)List of characters
Official website
Jurassicpark.com

Jurassic Park, later also referred to as Jurassic World,[1] is an American science fiction media franchise created by Michael Crichton and centered on a disastrous attempt to create a theme park of cloned dinosaurs. It began in 1990 when Universal Pictures and Amblin Entertainment bought the rights to Crichton's novel Jurassic Park before it was published. The book was successful, as was Steven Spielberg's 1993 film adaptation. The film received a theatrical 3D re-release in 2013,[2] and was selected in 2018 for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". A 1995 sequel novel, The Lost World, was followed by a film adaptation in 1997. Subsequent films in the series, including Jurassic Park III (2001), are not based on the novels.

In 2015, a second trilogy of films began with the fourth film in the series, Jurassic World. The film was successful, becoming the first film to gross over $500 million worldwide in its opening weekend,[3] and grossed over $1.6 billion through the course of its theatrical run, making it the third highest-grossing film at the time. It became the second highest-grossing film of 2015,[4] and is currently the seventh highest-grossing film of all time.[5] When adjusted for monetary inflation, Jurassic World is the second highest-grossing film in the franchise after Jurassic Park. A sequel, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018) grossed over $1.3 billion worldwide, making it the third Jurassic film to pass the billion-dollar mark. It is the third highest-grossing film of 2018,[6] and currently the 17th highest-grossing film of all time.[5] The final film in the trilogy, Jurassic World Dominion, was released in 2022. It has grossed over $1 billion worldwide and is currently the second highest-grossing film of 2022.[7] Jurassic World Dominion became the fourth film in the franchise to pass the billion-dollar mark.[8][9][10]

Numerous video games and comic books based on the franchise have been created since the release of the 1993 film, and several water rides have been opened at various Universal Studios theme parks. Lego has produced several animated projects based on the Jurassic World films, including Lego Jurassic World: Legend of Isla Nublar, a miniseries released in 2019. DreamWorks Animation also produced an animated series, Jurassic World Camp Cretaceous, which ran on Netflix from September 2020 to July 2022. As of 2000, the franchise had generated $5 billion in revenue making it one of the highest-grossing media franchises of all time.[11] The Jurassic Park franchise is also one of the highest-grossing film series of all time, having earned over $6 billion at the worldwide box office.[12][13]

Background[edit]

Premise and dinosaurs[edit]

The Jurassic Park franchise focuses on resurrected dinosaurs which wreak havoc on humans. The dinosaurs, created as theme park attractions, are cloned through genetic engineering. The process is accomplished by extracting ancient DNA from mosquitoes, which sucked the blood of dinosaurs and then became fossilized in amber, preserving the DNA. Scientists then fill gaps in the genome using frog DNA.[14] Although the films primarily take place on islands located in the Pacific coast of Central America, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018) sees the dinosaurs relocated throughout the world, including the U.S. mainland.[15]

The film series is notable for its recreation of dinosaurs, achieved primarily through animatronics and computer-generated imagery.[16][17] The first film was praised for its dinosaur effects, and created an increased interest in the field of paleontology, while changing the public perception of dinosaurs with its modern portrayal.[18][19] Later films largely ignored recent paleontological findings to maintain continuity with the earlier installments, leading to criticism among paleontologists.[20][21][22]

Jurassic World Dominion (2022) introduces feathered dinosaurs, in line with modern discoveries.[23]

InGen[edit]

The company logo for InGen in the film series

International Genetic Technologies, Inc. (InGen) is the fictional company responsible for cloning the dinosaurs. According to the novels, it is based in Palo Alto, California, and has one location in Europe as well.[nb 1] Nevertheless, most of InGen's research took place on the fictional islands of Isla Sorna and Isla Nublar, near Costa Rica.[nb 1][nb 2] While the first novel indicated InGen was just one of any number of small 1980s genetic engineering start-ups, the events of the novel and film revealed to a select group that InGen had discovered a method for cloning dinosaurs, which would be placed in an island theme park attraction.[nb 1]

InGen was well established in the first novel as the entity behind the park, but for simplicity the first film emphasized the Jurassic Park brand. The InGen name is visible in the film — on computer screens, helicopters, etc. — but is never spoken. InGen's corporate identity is more prominent in the second film. By the time that Jurassic World takes place, InGen and all its intellectual property has been absorbed by the Masrani Global Corporation.

Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction describes InGen as comparable to other "sleazy organizations".[24] Other sources reference the company's receiving a baby T. rex (in The Lost World: Jurassic Park) as an allusion to other exploitative entrepreneurs depicted in the 1933 film King Kong.[25] Ken Gelder describes InGen as "resolutely secretive", like the tax firm in John Grisham's 1991 novel The Firm.[26]

Biosyn[edit]

The logo for Biosyn in the film Jurassic World Dominion

In the novels, Biosyn Corporation (or Biosyn for short) is InGen's corporate rival. The company is controversial for its industrial espionage in the genetics industry. Lewis Dodgson, an employee of Biosyn, helps the company in its theft of corporate secrets. Biosyn is interested in acquiring InGen's dinosaur DNA, believing the animals present a variety of uses such as hunting trophies and pharmaceutical test subjects.[nb 1]

Dodgson makes only a minor appearance in the first film, and his employer is not named.[27] However, Biosyn is featured in several video games.[nb 3]

The company, as Biosyn Genetics, makes its film debut in Jurassic World Dominion (2022). By the time that the film takes place, Dodgson has become the company's CEO. Biosyn's employees now include geneticist Dr. Henry Wu and mathematician Dr. Ian Malcolm, the latter working as the company's in-house philosopher.[27] With dinosaurs loose around the world and captured by governments, Biosyn has a contract to house the animals at its headquarters in the Dolomites mountain range in Italy. In addition to performing pharmaceutical research on the dinosaurs, the company has also captured 14-year-old orphan Maisie Lockwood and unleashed giant locusts to devour their rivals' crops. By the end of the film, this plot is foiled and exposed to the public.[31][32] The film's director, Colin Trevorrow, described Biosyn not as an "evil" corporation but rather an entity with thousands of employees who have the best intentions in mind, only to feel betrayed by Dodgson upon learning of his actions.[33]

Isla Nublar[edit]

Map of Isla Nublar

Isla Nublar is a fictional Central American island that serves as a major setting in the first novel and its film adaptation, as well as the films Jurassic World and Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. According to the novel, its name means "Cloud Island" in Spanish. The tropical island is located 120 miles west of Costa Rica and has an inactive volcano. In the first novel and film, Isla Nublar is the location of Jurassic Park, a dinosaur theme park proposed by InGen, but it fails to open after the animals escape. In the novel, the Costa Rican government declares the island unsafe and has it napalmed; in the film series, the island continues to exist until the Jurassic World trilogy.

In Jurassic World, the theme park idea has been carried out successfully by Masrani Global Corporation. By the end of the film however, the island is overrun by dinosaurs once more following the Indominus rex incident.

In Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, Isla Nublar is destroyed when its volcano, Mount Sibo, becomes active again and erupts.[34]

In the films, several Hawaiian islands stood in as Isla Nublar, including Oahu and Kauai.[35][36][37] Some filming also took place on sound stages, in California for the original film,[38] and in Louisiana for Jurassic World.[39]

Isla Sorna[edit]

Isla Sorna, also called Site B, is another fictional Central American island. It is 87 miles southwest of Isla Nublar, and 207 miles west of Costa Rica. It is the main setting for the second novel and its film adaptation, as well as the third film. Isla Sorna is where InGen conducted much of its dinosaur research. It is here that the dinosaurs were bred before being shipped off to Isla Nublar; a laboratory on the latter island was built only as a showroom for tourists. Isla Sorna is significantly larger than Isla Nublar and has various climates including tropical, highland tropical and temperate rainforest. At the end of the second film, it is stated that Isla Sorna has been set up as a biological preserve for the animals.[40] Isla Sorna is part of a five-island chain known as Las Cinco Muertes (The Five Deaths), although the other islands do not play a role in the novels or films.

The status of Isla Sorna is not mentioned in Jurassic World or Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, but a promotional website for the latter film states that the island ecosystem suffered a breakdown after illegally-cloned animals were introduced there. The surviving dinosaurs were relocated to Isla Nublar for the opening of the Jurassic World theme park, leaving Sorna abandoned.[41][40] Jurassic World Dominion shows the two adult Tyrannosaurus from Isla Sorna encountering the Tyrannosaurus from Isla Nublar. In the same movie, Ramsay Cole mentions that Isla Sorna's dinosaurs have been relocated to BioSyn's valley along with those from Isla Nublar that have been rounded up. The island briefly appears in video footage from 1986 shown to Maisie Lockwood by Henry Wu.

For the second film, Humboldt County, California served as the primary location for scenes set on Isla Sorna, giving it a forest climate.[42][43] Filming also took place on sound stages at Universal Studios Hollywood,[44] and a beach scene was shot on Kauai.[45][46] The third film largely uses Oahu and Kauai to represent Isla Sorna, as the original film had done for Isla Nublar. A jungle set was also built on a sound stage at Universal Studios.[47][48]

Novels[edit]

Cover of Michael Crichton's Jurassic World two-novel set

Jurassic Park (1990)[edit]

In 1983, Michael Crichton originally conceived a screenplay about a pterosaur being cloned from fossil DNA.[49] After wrestling with this idea for a while, he came up with the story of Jurassic Park.[50] Crichton worked on the book for several years; he decided his first draft would have a theme park for the setting (similar to his 1973 film Westworld) and a young boy as the main character.[49] Response was extremely negative, so Crichton rewrote the story to make it from an adult's point of view, which resulted in more positive feedback.[49]

Steven Spielberg learned of the novel in October 1989 while he and Crichton were discussing a screenplay that would become the TV series ER. Warner Bros. Pictures, Columbia Pictures, 20th Century Fox, and Universal Pictures bid for the rights to the novel before its publication. In May 1990, Universal acquired the rights, with the backing of Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment.[51] Crichton put up a non-negotiable fee for $1.5 million as well as a substantial percentage of the gross. Universal further paid Crichton $500,000 to adapt his own novel (Malia Scotch Marmo, who was a writer on Spielberg's 1991 film Hook, wrote the next draft of Jurassic Park, but was not credited; David Koepp wrote the final draft, which left out much of the novel's exposition and violence, and made numerous changes to the characters).[52] Universal desperately needed money to keep their company alive, and partially succeeded with Jurassic Park, as it became a critical[53] and commercial[54] success.

The Lost World (1995)[edit]

After the film adaptation of Jurassic Park was released to home video, Crichton was pressured from many sources for a sequel novel.[55] Crichton declined all offers until Spielberg himself told him that he would be keen to direct a movie adaptation of the sequel, if one were written. Crichton began work almost immediately and in 1995 published The Lost World. Crichton confirmed that his novel had elements taken from the novel of the same name by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.[56] The book was also an outstanding success, both with professional and amateur critics.[55] The film adaptation, The Lost World: Jurassic Park, began production in September 1996.[57]

Jurassic Park Adventures (2001–2002)[edit]

Scott Ciencin wrote a trilogy of spin-off novels based upon Jurassic Park III. The series contained Jurassic Park Adventures: Survivor and Jurassic Park Adventures: Prey, both released in 2001, and Jurassic Park Adventures: Flyers, released the following year.

The Evolution of Claire (2018)[edit]

The Evolution of Claire (Jurassic World)[58] is a young adult novel written by Tess Sharpe. It is based upon the Jurassic World trilogy, and was released in 2018 in conjunction with the release of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. It is a spin-off set in 2004, prior to the opening of the Jurassic World theme park. The novel is about college freshman Claire Dearing during her summer internship at the park.[59]

Films[edit]

Film U.S. release date Director(s) Screenwriter(s) Story by Producer(s)
Jurassic Park trilogy
Jurassic Park June 11, 1993 (1993-06-11) Steven Spielberg Michael Crichton and David Koepp Gerald Molen and Kathleen Kennedy
The Lost World: Jurassic Park May 23, 1997 (1997-05-23) David Koepp Gerald Molen and Colin Wilson
Jurassic Park III July 18, 2001 (2001-07-18) Joe Johnston Peter Buchman and Alexander Payne & Jim Taylor Kathleen Kennedy and Larry Franco
Jurassic World trilogy
Jurassic World June 12, 2015 (2015-06-12) Colin Trevorrow Rick Jaffa & Amanda Silver and Derek Connolly & Colin Trevorrow Rick Jaffa & Amanda Silver Frank Marshall and Patrick Crowley
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom June 22, 2018 (2018-06-22) J. A. Bayona Derek Connolly & Colin Trevorrow Frank Marshall, Patrick Crowley and Belén Atienza
Jurassic World Dominion June 10, 2022 (2022-06-10) Colin Trevorrow Emily Carmichael & Colin Trevorrow Derek Connolly & Colin Trevorrow Frank Marshall and Patrick Crowley

Jurassic Park trilogy[edit]

Jurassic Park (1993)[edit]

1917 skeletal diagram of Tyrannosaurus published by Henry Fairfield Osborn, which was the basis of the covers of Jurassic Park and The Lost World, and subsequently the logo of the movies
Theatrical poster for the 3D re-release of Jurassic Park

John Hammond (Richard Attenborough) is the owner of Jurassic Park, a theme park located on Isla Nublar. After an incident with a velociraptor, Hammond brings in three specialists to sign off on the park to calm investors. The specialists, paleontologist Alan Grant (Sam Neill), paleobotanist Ellie Sattler (Laura Dern), and chaos theorist Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum), are surprised to see that the island park's main attraction are living, breathing dinosaurs, created with a mixture of fossilized DNA and genetic cross-breeding/cloning. When lead programmer Dennis Nedry (Wayne Knight) turns off the park's power to sneak out with samples of the dinosaur embryos to sell to a corporate rival, the dinosaurs break free, and the survivors are forced to find a way to turn the power back on and make it out alive. The film also stars Bob Peck, Martin Ferrero, BD Wong, Ariana Richards, Joseph Mazzello, and Samuel L. Jackson.

Spielberg cited Godzilla as an inspiration for Jurassic Park, specifically Godzilla, King of the Monsters! (1956), which he grew up watching. During production, Spielberg described Godzilla as "the most masterful of all the dinosaur movies because it made you believe it was really happening".[60]

Jurassic Park's biggest impact on subsequent films was a result of its breakthrough use of computer-generated imagery.[61][62][63] The film is regarded as a landmark for visual effects.[64][65][66] It received positive reviews from critics, who praised the effects, though reactions to other elements of the picture, such as character development, were mixed. During its release, the film grossed more than $914 million worldwide,[67] becoming the most successful film released up to that time (surpassing E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial and surpassed 4 years later by Titanic), and it is currently the 17th highest grossing feature film (taking inflation into account, it is the 20th-highest-grossing film in North America). It is the most financially successful film for NBCUniversal and Steven Spielberg.

Recently, Jurassic Park has been proposed to be recognized as Intangible Geoheritage due to its cultural impact on the people's views about dinosaurs, including a change in the popular iconography of carnivorous dinosaurs.[68]

Jurassic Park had two re-releases: The first on September 23, 2011, in the United Kingdom and the second in which it was converted into 3D on April 5, 2013, for its 20th anniversary, which resulted in the film passing the $1 billion mark at the worldwide box office.[69][70][71] In 2018, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".[72]

The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997)[edit]

Before The Lost World was published, a film adaptation was already in pre-production, with its release occurring in May 1997. The film was a commercial success, breaking many box-office records when released. The film was released to mixed reviews, similar to its predecessor in terms of characterization.[73] Critical response to The Lost World has since become more favorable, with some publications calling it the best Jurassic Park sequel.[74][75] Much like the first film, The Lost World: Jurassic Park made a number of changes to the plot and characters from the book, replacing the corporate rivals with an internal power struggle and changing the roles or characterizations of several protagonists.

When a vacationing family stumbles upon the dinosaurs of Isla Sorna, a secondary island where the animals were bred en masse and allowed to grow before being transported to the park, Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum) is called in by John Hammond (Richard Attenborough) to lead a team to document the island to turn it into a preserve, where the animals can roam free without interference from the outside world. Malcolm agrees to go when he discovers his girlfriend, paleontologist Sarah Harding (Julianne Moore) is already on the island, while at the same time Hammond's nephew, Peter Ludlow (Arliss Howard), has taken over his uncle's company and leads a team of hunters to capture the creatures and bring them back to a theme park in San Diego. The two groups clash and are ultimately forced to work together to evade the predatory creatures and survive the second island. The film also stars Pete Postlethwaite, Richard Schiff, Vince Vaughn, Vanessa Lee Chester, Peter Stormare, and a young Camilla Belle.

Jurassic Park III (2001)[edit]

Joe Johnston had been interested in directing the sequel to Jurassic Park and approached his friend Steven Spielberg about the project. While Spielberg wanted to direct the first sequel, he agreed that if there was ever a third film, Johnston could direct.[76] Spielberg, nevertheless, stayed involved in this film by becoming its executive producer. Production began on August 30, 2000,[77] with filming in California, and the Hawaiian islands of Kauai, Oahu, and Molokai.[78] It is the first Jurassic Park film not to be based on a novel, although it does incorporate some unused plot elements from the Crichton novels, such as the river escape and the pterosaur aviary. Jurassic Park III had a troubled production,[79] and received mixed reviews from critics.[80]

When their son goes missing while parasailing at Isla Sorna, the Kirbys (William H. Macy and Téa Leoni) hire Alan Grant (Sam Neill) under false pretenses to help them navigate the island. Believing it to be nothing more than sight-seeing, and that he will act as a dinosaur guide from the safety of their plane, he is startled to find them landing on the ground, where they are stalked by a Spinosaurus, which destroys their plane. As they search for the Kirbys' son, the situation grows dire as Velociraptors hunt their group and they must find a way off the island. The film also stars Alessandro Nivola, Michael Jeter, Trevor Morgan, Mark Harelik, and Laura Dern.

Jurassic World trilogy[edit]

Logo used for the Jurassic World trilogy

Jurassic World (2015)[edit]

Steven Spielberg devised a story idea for a fourth film in 2001, during production of Jurassic Park III.[81] In 2002, William Monahan was hired to write the script,[82] with the film's release scheduled for 2005.[83] Early aspects of the plot included dinosaurs escaping to the mainland,[84][85][86] and an army of genetically modified dinosaur-human mercenaries.[87][88][89][90] Monahan finished the first draft of the script in 2003.[91] Sam Neill and Richard Attenborough were set to reprise their characters,[86][92] while Keira Knightley was in talks for two separate roles.[93] In 2004, John Sayles wrote two drafts of the script.[94][95] Sayles' first draft involved a team of Deinonychus being trained for use in rescue missions.[96][97][98]

Both drafts were scrapped, and a new script was being worked on in 2006.[99][100][101] Laura Dern was contacted to reprise her role, with the film expected for release in 2008.[102][103] The film was further delayed by the 2007–08 Writers Guild of America strike.[104] Mark Protosevich wrote two film treatments in 2011, which were rejected.[105] Rise of the Planet of the Apes screenwriters Rick Jaffa and Amanda Silver were hired in 2012 to write an early draft of the script.[106] In 2013, Colin Trevorrow was announced as a director and co-writer,[107][108] with the film scheduled for release on June 12, 2015.[109] The film was shot in Univisium 2.00:1.[110] It grossed over $1.6 billion worldwide and received generally positive reviews.[111][112][113]

The film features a new park, Jurassic World, built on the remains of the original park on Isla Nublar.[114] The film sees the park run by Simon Masrani (Irrfan Khan) and Masrani Corp, and features the return of Dr. Henry Wu (BD Wong) from the first film.[115] Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard, and Jake Johnson star, while Vincent D'Onofrio portrayed the main antagonist, Vic Hoskins. The cast also includes Lauren Lapkus,[116] Ty Simpkins, Nick Robinson, Omar Sy, and Judy Greer. The primary dinosaur antagonist is Indominus rex, a genetically-modified hybrid of Tyrannosaurus rex and several other species, including Velociraptor, cuttlefish, tree frog, and pit viper. The Indominus Rex also features a chameleon-like camouflage ability, which was a plot element from the second Crichton novel unused in previous films.[117][118]

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018)[edit]

A sequel to Jurassic World was released on June 22, 2018.[119][120] The film was directed by J. A. Bayona and written by Trevorrow and Connolly,[120][121] with Trevorrow and Spielberg as executive producers.[120] The film stars Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard, Rafe Spall, Justice Smith, Daniella Pineda, James Cromwell, Toby Jones, Ted Levine, BD Wong, Isabella Sermon, and Geraldine Chaplin, with Jeff Goldblum reprising his role as Dr. Ian Malcolm.[122]

During early conversations on Jurassic World, Spielberg told Trevorrow that he was interested in having several more films made.[123] In April 2014, Trevorrow announced that sequels to Jurassic World had been discussed: "We wanted to create something that would be a little bit less arbitrary and episodic, and something that could potentially arc into a series that would feel like a complete story".[124] Trevorrow, who said he would direct the film if asked,[124] later told Spielberg that he would only focus on directing one film in the series.[123] Trevorrow believed that different directors could bring different qualities to future films.[125] Bayona was once considered to direct Jurassic World, but he declined as he felt there was not enough time for production.[126] Filming took place from February to July 2017, in the United Kingdom and Hawaii.[122][127][128]

Former Jurassic World manager Claire Dearing and Velociraptor handler Owen Grady join a mission to rescue Isla Nublar's dinosaurs from a volcanic eruption by relocating them to a new island sanctuary. They discover that the mission is part of a scheme to sell the captured dinosaurs on the black market in order to fund his party's genetic research. The captured dinosaurs are brought to an estate in northern California, where several of the creatures are auctioned and subsequently shipped to their new owners. A new hybrid dinosaur, the Indoraptor (one of the primary antagonists of the film), escapes and terrorizes people at the estate, forcing Owen and Claire to survive the chaos and rampage in the estate. A subplot about human cloning was introduced in the film. Fallen Kingdom, similar to the second installment, The Lost World, re-explores the themes about the aftermath of the dinosaur park's demise on Isla Nublar and dinosaurs being used for exploitation by humans. The film grossed over $1.3 billion worldwide, and received mixed reviews from critics.[129][130][131]

Jurassic World Dominion (2022)[edit]

Jurassic World Dominion was released on June 10, 2022.[132] It was directed by Trevorrow, with a screenplay written by him and Emily Carmichael, based on a story by Trevorrow and Connolly. Trevorrow and Spielberg serve as executive producers for the film, with Frank Marshall and Patrick Crowley as producers.[133][134][135] The film stars Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard, returning from the previous Jurassic World films. Sam Neill, Laura Dern and Jeff Goldblum also reprise their characters for major roles,[136] marking the trio's first film appearance together since the original Jurassic Park film.[137][138] In addition, Daniella Pineda, Justice Smith, Isabella Sermon, and Omar Sy reprise their roles from the previous two films.[139][140] Other actors include Mamoudou Athie,[141] DeWanda Wise,[142] Dichen Lachman, and Scott Haze.[143][144] Campbell Scott portrays the character Lewis Dodgson from the first film, originally played by Cameron Thor.[145]

Planning for the film dates to 2014.[146][121] Trevorrow and Carmichael were writing the script as of April 2018.[147] Trevorrow said the film would focus on the dinosaurs that went open source after being sold and spread around the world in Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, allowing people other than Dr. Henry Wu to create their own dinosaurs.[15][148][34] Trevorrow stated that the film would be set around the world, and said that the idea of Henry Wu being the only person who knows how to create a dinosaur was far-fetched "after 30 years of this technology existing" within the films' universe.[148] Additionally, the film would focus on the dinosaurs that were freed at the end of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom,[15][148][34] but it would not depict dinosaurs terrorizing cities and going to war against humans; Trevorrow considered such ideas unrealistic. Instead, Trevorrow was interested in a world where "dinosaur interaction is unlikely but possible—the same way we watch out for bears or sharks".[149][150] Certain scenes and ideas regarding the integration of dinosaurs into the world were ultimately removed from the Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom script to be saved for the third film.[148][34]

Filming locations included Canada, England's Pinewood Studios, and the country of Malta.[132][151] Jurassic World Dominion began filming in February 2020,[132] but was put on hiatus several weeks later as a safety precaution due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[152] Production later resumed that July, with numerous health precautions in place, including COVID-19 testing and social distancing.[153] Filming wrapped four months later.[132] Jurassic World Dominion uses more animatronics than the previous films. The animatronic dinosaurs were created by John Nolan and his team.[154][155][156] It is also the first film in the series to feature feathered dinosaurs.[157][158] The film is set four years after the events of Fallen Kingdom, with dinosaurs now living alongside humans around the world. It follows Owen Grady and Claire Dearing as they embark on a rescue mission, while Alan Grant and Ellie Sattler reunite with Ian Malcolm to expose a conspiracy by the genomics corporation Biosyn, a once rival of the defunct InGen. Jurassic World Dominion has grossed over $1 billion worldwide but received mixed-to-negative reviews from critics.[159][160][161] An extended version of Jurassic World Dominion was released on 4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray and DVD on August 16, 2022.[162][163] The extended edition received more favorable reviews and is considered an improvement over the theatrical cut.[164][165][166]

Future[edit]

Jurassic World Dominion concludes the second film trilogy as well as the storyline that began in the original trilogy,[167][168][169] although future films in the franchise have not been ruled out. Marshall said in May 2020 that Jurassic World Dominion would mark "the start of a new era", in which humans have to adjust to dinosaurs being on the mainland.[170] Marshall reiterated in January 2022 that there could be more films: "We're going to sit down, and we're going to see what the future is".[168]

Trevorrow, noting that he spent nine years working on the Jurassic World trilogy, said in May 2022 that he would likely not return for another film, except in a possible advisory role.[171] He expressed interest in having Howard direct a future film.[172] He also suggested that several characters introduced in Dominion could return for future installments, including Kayla Watts (portrayed by DeWanda Wise), Ramsay Cole (Mamoudou Athie), and Soyona Santos (Dichen Lachman).[33][173] Pratt and Howard do not expect to reprise their roles again,[174] and Neill said Dominion would be the last film for Dern, Goldblum and himself.[175]

Short films[edit]

As of 2022, two short films have been released. Both take place between Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom and Jurassic World Dominion, and are considered canon with the film series.

Film U.S. release date Director(s) Screenwriter(s) Producer(s)
Battle at Big Rock September 15, 2019 Colin Trevorrow Emily Carmichael and Colin Trevorrow Patrick Crowley and Frank Marshall
Jurassic World Dominion prologue November 23, 2021

Battle at Big Rock (2019)[edit]

Battle at Big Rock is the first live-action short film in the franchise, and was released on September 15, 2019. The eight-minute film was directed by Colin Trevorrow,[176] and was co-written by him and Emily Carmichael. The film stars André Holland, Natalie Martinez, Melody Hurd, and Pierson Salvador.[176][177]

The film is set one year after the events of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. In the film, a family goes on a camping trip at the fictional Big Rock National Park in northern California, approximately 20 miles from where dinosaurs from Fallen Kingdom were let loose. The film chronicles the first major confrontation between humans and the dinosaurs.[176]

Jurassic World Dominion prologue (2021)[edit]

A five-minute Jurassic World Dominion prologue was released in 2021, serving as the franchise's second live-action short film. It was originally intended as the film's opening sequence before being removed from the final cut. It features a prehistoric segment showcasing dinosaurs in their natural habitats, then cuts to the present day as a T. rex wreaks havoc at a drive-in theater.[178][179] The prologue is used as the opening sequence in the extended edition of Jurassic World Dominion.[180]

Television[edit]

Lego animated projects[edit]

Lego produced various CGI-animated projects, including the two-part television special Lego Jurassic World: The Secret Exhibit, which aired on NBC on November 29, 2018.[181] A 13-episode miniseries, Lego Jurassic World: Legend of Isla Nublar, premiered in 2019. It was broadcast on Family Channel in Canada and on Nickelodeon in the U.S.[182][183]

Jurassic World Camp Cretaceous (2020–2022)[edit]

SeasonEpisodesOriginally released
18September 18, 2020 (2020-09-18)
28January 22, 2021 (2021-01-22)
310May 21, 2021 (2021-05-21)
411December 3, 2021 (2021-12-03)
512July 21, 2022 (2022-07-21)
61November 15, 2022 (2022-11-15)

Jurassic World Camp Cretaceous is a CGI-animated series that debuted on Netflix in 2020. It is a joint project between Netflix, Universal Studios, Amblin Entertainment and DreamWorks Animation. Scott Kreamer and Lane Lueras are the showrunners, and executive produce the series with Spielberg, Marshall, and Trevorrow, while Zack Stentz serves as consulting producer. The series is set during the events of the Jurassic World trilogy, and is about a group of six teenagers attending an adventure camp on Isla Nublar. When the park's dinosaurs escape, the teenagers are stranded and must work together to escape the island.[184] The series premiered globally on Netflix on September 18, 2020 and ran for five seasons, concluding on July 21, 2022. It consists of 49 episodes. The voice cast includes Paul-Mikél Williams, Jenna Ortega, Ryan Potter, Raini Rodriguez, Sean Giambrone, Kausar Mohammed, Jameela Jamil, and Glen Powell.[185][186]

Live-action series[edit]

A live-action television series based on the Jurassic World films was reportedly in development as of March 2020.[187][188][189] However, Marshall said two years later that such a series had not been discussed, and that his focus was on the films. Speaking about Camp Cretaceous, Marshall said: "I think that's plenty for now".[190]

Cancelled projects[edit]

Escape from Jurassic Park[edit]

In June 1993, after the theatrical release of Jurassic Park, spokesmen for Amblin and MCA confirmed that an animated series based on the film was in development and awaiting Spielberg's final approval.[191] The series, titled Escape from Jurassic Park,[192] would have consisted of 23 episodes for its first season. The series would have centered on John Hammond's attempts to finish Jurassic Park and open it to the public, while InGen's corporate rival Biosyn is simultaneously planning to open their own dinosaur theme park in Brazil, which ultimately ends with their dinosaurs escaping into the jungles.[193][194][195]

If produced, it was believed that the project would be the most expensive animated series up to that time. Jeff Segal, president of Universal Cartoon Studios, said: "We are developing a TV series that we anticipate would be computer animated and very sophisticated. However, Spielberg has not had a chance yet to look at either the material or the format for the series".[191] Segal said Universal was considering the possibility of developing the series for prime time, also commenting about the series' storyline: "It would essentially pick up from the closing moments of the movie and it would continue the story in a very dramatic way. The intention would be to continue with the primary characters and also introduce new characters". Segal also said the series would be aimed specifically at the same target audience as the film, while hoping that it would also appeal to young children.[191]

Animation veteran and comic artist Will Meugniot (then working at Universal Cartoon Studios for various projects, including Exosquad) contacted artist William Stout to ask if he would be interested in designing the animated series. According to Stout: "This was not going to be a kiddy show (although kids of all ages, including myself, could enjoy it). They wanted the show to be a mature prime time series with top writers and state-of-the-art television animation augmented with quite a bit of CG animation". Universal Animation Studios wanted the show to have the look of a graphic novel.[196]

Stout was hired to work on the series and subsequently made a trailer to demonstrate how the series would look, and how it would combine traditional animation with computer animation. The series required Spielberg's final approval before it could go into production. However, Spielberg had grown tired of the massive promotion and merchandise revolving around the film, and never watched the trailer.[196] On July 13, 1993, Margaret Loesch, president of the Fox Children's Network, confirmed that discussions had been held with Spielberg about an animated version of the film. Loesch also said: "At least for now and in the foreseeable future, there will not be an animated Jurassic Park. That's Steven Spielberg's decision, and we respect that decision".[197]

Jurassic Park: Chaos Effect[edit]

Part three of the four-part comic adaptation of The Lost World: Jurassic Park, published by Topps Comics in July 1997, confirmed to readers that a cartoon series based on the film was in development.[198][199] It was commissioned by Spielberg and would be developed by DreamWorks Animation.[200] In November 1997, it was reported that the cartoon would be accompanied by Jurassic Park: Chaos Effect, a series of dinosaur toys produced by Kenner and based on a premise that scientists had created dinosaur hybrids consisting of DNA from different creatures.[201][202] The new toys were based on the upcoming cartoon.[201] It was also reported that the cartoon could be ready by March 1998, as a mid-season replacement.[201] The Chaos Effect toyline was released in June 1998,[202] but the animated series was never produced, for unknown reasons.[203]

Cast and crew[edit]

Principal cast[edit]

List indicator(s)

This section shows characters who will appear or have appeared in the franchise.

  • An empty, dark grey cell indicates the character was not in the film, or that the character's official presence has not yet been confirmed.
  •  C indicates a cameo role.
  •  O indicates an older version of the character.
  •  P indicates an appearance in onscreen photographs.
  •  V indicates a voice-only role.
Characters Films Animated series
Jurassic Park The Lost World: Jurassic Park Jurassic Park III Jurassic World Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Jurassic World Dominion Lego Jurassic World:
Legend of Isla Nublar
Jurassic World Camp Cretaceous
1993 1997 2001 2015 2018 2022 2019 2020–2022
Dr. Alan Grant Sam Neill Sam Neill Sam Neill Adrian HoughV
Dr. Ellie Sattler Laura Dern Laura Dern Laura Dern
Dr. Ian Malcolm Jeff Goldblum Jeff GoldblumP Jeff Goldblum Bradley DuffyV
John Hammond Richard Attenborough Richard AttenboroughP
Lex Murphy Ariana Richards Arianna RichardsC
Tim Murphy Joseph Mazzello Joseph MazelloC
Dr. Henry Wu BD Wong BD Wong Vincent TongV Greg ChunV
Dennis Nedry Wayne Knight William KuklisV
Lewis Dodgson Cameron Thor Campbell Scott Adam HarringtonV
Mr. DNA Greg BursonV Colin TrevorrowV Vincent TongV Jeff BergmanV
Owen Grady Chris Pratt[147] Ian HanlinV
Claire Dearing Bryce Dallas Howard[147] Britt McKillipV
Simon Masrani Irrfan Khan DhirendraV
Vic Hoskins Vincent D'Onofrio Alex ZaharaV
Barry Sembène Omar Sy Omar Sy
Lowery Jake Johnson Jake JohnsonP
Vivian Lauren Lapkus Lauren LapkusP
Franklin Webb Justice Smith
Dr. Zia Rodriguez Daniella Pineda Daniella PinedaC
Maisie Lockwood Isabella Sermon
Charlotte Lockwood Isabella SermonP[15] Isabella Sermon
Elva TrillO
Iris Geraldine Chaplin Geraldine ChaplinP
Robert Muldoon Bob Peck
Donald Gennaro Martin Ferrero
Ray Arnold Samuel L. Jackson
Dr. Harding Jerry Molen
Dr. Sarah Harding Julianne Moore
Kelly Curtis Vanessa Lee Chester
Nick Van Owen Vince Vaughn
Eddie Carr Richard Schiff
Roland Tembo Pete Postlethwaite
Peter Ludlow Arliss Howard
Ajay Sidhu Harvey Jason
Dr. Robert Burke Thomas F. Duffy
Dieter Stark Peter Stormare
Carter Thomas Rosales Jr.
Paul Kirby William H. Macy
Amanda Kirby Téa Leoni
Billy Brennan Alessandro Nivola
Eric Kirby Trevor Morgan
Udesky Michael Jeter
Nash Bruce A. Young
Cooper John Diehl
Ben Hildebrand Mark Harelik
Gray Mitchell Ty Simpkins
Zach Mitchell Nick Robinson
Karen Mitchell Judy Greer
Scott Mitchell Andy Buckley
Zara Katie McGrath
Sir Benjamin Lockwood James Cromwell
Eli Mills Rafe Spall
Ken Wheatley Ted Levine
Mr. Eversoll Toby Jones
Ramsay Cole Mamoudou Athie
Kayla Watts DeWanda Wise
Soyona Santos Dichen Lachman
Rainn Delacourt Scott Haze
Allison Miles Bethany BrownV
Danny Nedermeyer Adrian PetriwV
Sinjin Prescott Andrew KavadasV
Larson Mitchell Kirby MorrowV
Hudson Harper Nicholas HolmesV
Dianne Patricia DrakeV
Stella Sabrina PitreV

Additional crew[edit]

Role Jurassic Park The Lost World:
Jurassic Park
Jurassic Park III Jurassic World Jurassic World:
Fallen Kingdom
Jurassic World
Dominion
1993 1997 2001 2015 2018 2022
Composer John Williams Don Davis Michael Giacchino[204]
Editor Michael Kahn Robert Dalva Kevin Stitt Bernat Vilaplana[205] Mark Sanger[206]
Cinematographer Dean Cundey Janusz Kamiński Shelly Johnson John Schwartzman Óscar Faura John Schwartzman
Production designer Rick Carter Edward Verreaux Andy Nicholson Kevin Jenkins[207]
Production companies Amblin Entertainment Amblin Entertainment
Legendary Entertainment
The Kennedy/Marshall Company
Amblin Entertainment
Legendary Entertainment
Perfect World Pictures
The Kennedy/Marshall Company
Amblin Entertainment
Perfect World Pictures
The Kennedy/Marshall Company[208]
Distributor Universal Pictures

Reception[edit]

Box office performance[edit]

Film North American
release date
Budget Box office gross Box office ranking Reference
North America Other territories Worldwide All-time
North America
All-time
worldwide
Jurassic Park June 11, 1993 $63 million $404,214,720 $629,713,583 $1,033,928,303 #40 #32 [209]
The Lost World: Jurassic Park May 23, 1997 $73 million $229,086,679 $389,552,320 $618,638,999 #162 #168 [210]
Jurassic Park III July 18, 2001 $93 million $181,171,875 $187,608,934 $368,780,809 #267 #379 [211]
Jurassic World June 12, 2015 $150 million $653,406,625 $1,018,130,819 $1,671,537,444 #9 #7 [212]
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom June 22, 2018 $170 million $417,719,760 $892,746,536 $1,310,466,296 #31 #17 [213]
Jurassic World Dominion June 10, 2022 $185 million $376,004,695 $625,624,488 $1,001,625,488 #49 #50 [214]
Total $734 million $2,261,304,355 3,809,147,380 $6,070,748,039 [215][210][211][212][213][214]

Critical and public response[edit]

Film Critical Public
Rotten Tomatoes Metacritic CinemaScore[216]
Jurassic Park 92% (134 reviews)[217] 68 (20 critics)[218] A
The Lost World: Jurassic Park 54% (82 reviews)[219] 59 (18 critics)[220] B+
Jurassic Park III 49% (187 reviews)[221] 42 (30 critics)[222] B−
Jurassic World 71% (358 reviews)[223] 59 (49 critics)[224] A
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom 47% (433 reviews)[225] 51 (59 critics)[226] A−
Jurassic World Dominion 29% (390 reviews)[227] 38 (59 critics)[228] A−

Accolades[edit]

Award Category Film
Jurassic Park The Lost World:
Jurassic Park
Academy Award Sound Editing Won
Academy Award Sound Mixing Won
Academy Award Visual Effects Won Nominated
Grammy Award Best Score Soundtrack Nominated Nominated

Music[edit]

Title U.S. release date Length Composer(s) Label
Jurassic Park: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack May 25, 1993 1:13:13 John Williams MCA
The Lost World: Jurassic Park (Original Motion Picture Score) April 30, 1997 1:13:15 MCA, La-La Land
Jurassic Park III: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack June 12, 2001 54:31 Don Davis Decca
Jurassic World: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack June 9, 2015 1:17:05 Michael Giacchino Back Lot Music
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) June 15, 2018 1:19:54
Jurassic World Dominion (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) June 3, 2022 1:47:00

Merchandise and other media[edit]

Toys[edit]

For the 1993 film, Kenner produced a line of action figures and dinosaurs,[229] marketed with the slogan, "If it's not 'Jurassic Park', it's extinct".[230][231] Paleontologist Jack Horner, who offered his advice for the film's dinosaurs, was also hired as a scientific advisor for the dinosaur toys.[232] Kenner had two years to develop the toys, which sold successfully.[233] Dakin also produced stuffed dinosaurs based on the film.[229]

Kenner produced another toy line for the 1997 sequel.[234] The company also released Jurassic Park: Chaos Effect a year later.[235][236] The toy line's premise involved scientists who had created new dinosaur species by combining the DNA of existing dinosaurs.[237][238][239]

Kenner's parent company, Hasbro, took over toy production for Jurassic Park III, released in 2001.[240] At that time, Playskool also released a toy line aimed at young children, under the name Jurassic Park Junior.[241][242] Jurassic Park III toys were also released under the Lego Studios brand.[243][244] Hasbro also created a toy line for Jurassic World.[245][246] Some of the toy dinosaurs had been referred to on packaging as males, despite being females in the film. This drew some criticism which accused Hasbro of catering solely to a male demographic.[247][248] Hasbro updated the pronouns shortly after the toy line's release.[249] The Lego Jurassic World line was also released in 2015.

In 2016, Mattel took the toy license from Hasbro, in a deal which started one year later.[250][251][252] Mattel produced various toys for Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom,[253] including dinosaurs, action figures,[254][255] and Barbie dolls.[256] Mattel's dinosaur toys included symbols which could be scanned with a cell phone, providing facts about each animal through a mobile app known as Jurassic World Facts.[255][257] Lego and Funko also created toys based on the film.[258][259] In addition, Mattel released the Jurassic World Legacy Collection, which included toys based on characters and dinosaurs from the Jurassic Park trilogy.[260][261]

In 2019, Mattel unveiled the Amber Collection, a toy line of posable characters and dinosaurs[262] that had been featured in the first film.[263][264][265][266] A year later, the company released toys based on Jurassic World Camp Cretaceous.[267][268] In February 2021, Mattel and Target partnered to sell a line of toys custom-made by the fan site Jurassic Outpost.[269] The Amber Collection continued into 2021,[270] and a new series of toys, known as the Hammond Collection, was released in 2022.[271]

Board games[edit]

Board games were released by Milton Bradley for the first two Jurassic Park films.[272][273][274][275] Hasbro and Milton Bradley also released two board games for Jurassic Park III.[241][276][277]

Jurassic Park: Danger!, released by Ravensburger in 2018, pits humans and dinosaurs against each other.[278] Meanwhile, Mondo was working on a board game to be known as Jurassic Park: The Chaos Gene,[279][280][281] although it was canceled during development.[282] In 2019, Mondo announced that characters and dinosaurs from the Jurassic Park franchise would be released as playable characters for its Unmatched board game.[283] The first set of characters was released in 2020.[284]

In 2021, Hasbro released a version of Monopoly based on the original Jurassic Park film.[285][286] Jurassic World: The Legacy of Isla Nublar is a legacy board game released in 2022. It was designed by Funko's design studio, Prospero Hall.[287][288]

Comics[edit]

Topps Comics[edit]

From June 1993 to August 1997, the now-defunct Topps Comics published comic adaptations of Jurassic Park and The Lost World: Jurassic Park, as well as several tie-in series.

  • Jurassic Park #0–4 (June–September 1993). Adaptation of the film, adapted by Walter Simonson and pencilled by Gil Kane.[289] Each issue had two covers – a main cover by Gil Kane, with the variant by Dave Cockrum. Issue #0 features two prequel stories to the film, and was only available with the trade paperback of the film adaptation.
  • Jurassic Park: Raptor #1–2 (November–December 1993). Written by Steve Englehart and pencilled by Armando Gil and Dell Barras.
  • Jurassic Park: Raptors Attack #1–4 (March–June 1994). Written by Steve Englehart, pencilled by Armando Gil (#1) and Chaz Truog, with covers by Michael Golden.
  • Jurassic Park: Raptors Hijack #1–4 (July–October 1994). Written by Steve Englehart, pencilled by Neil Vokes, with covers by Michael Golden.
  • Jurassic Park Annual #1 (May 1995). Featuring two stories, one being a sequel and one being a prequel. Written by Bob Almond, Michael Golden and Renée Witterstaetter, pencilled by Claude St. Aubin and Ed Murr, with a cover by Michael Golden.
  • Return to Jurassic Park #1–9 (April 1995 – February 1996). An ongoing series, the first four issues were written by Steve Englehart and pencilled by Joe Staton. The next four issues were written by Tom Bierbaum and Mary Bierbaum, being drawn by Armando Gil. The first 8 issues had covers by Michael Golden. The ninth and final issue was a jam book[clarification needed] written by Keith Giffen and Dwight Jon Zimmerman, featuring artwork by such acclaimed artists as Jason Pearson, Adam Hughes, Paul Gulacy, John Byrne, Kevin Maguire, Mike Zeck, George Pérez and Paul Chadwick, with a cover by John Bolton.
  • The Lost World: Jurassic Park #1–4 (May–August 1997). Adaptation of the second film, adapted by Don McGregor and pencilled by Jeff Butler (#1–2) and Claude St. Aubin (#3–4). Each issue of the series featured two covers – one by Walter Simonson and a photo cover.

IDW Comics[edit]

Beginning in June 2010, IDW Publishing began publishing Jurassic Park comics. They also acquired the rights to reprint the issues published by Topps in the 1990s, which they began to do in trade paperback format starting in November 2010. After a four-year hiatus, IDW announced a comic series based on Jurassic World that was to be released in 2017.[290]

This series has been collected in the following trade paperbacks:

Title Material collected No. of pages ISBN
Jurassic Park Jurassic Park #1–4 128 pages 1-85286-502-4
The Lost World: Jurassic Park The Lost World: Jurassic Park #1–4 96 pages 1-85286-885-6
Jurassic Park Vol. 1: Redemption Jurassic Park Redemption #1–5 120 pages 1-60010-850-4
Jurassic Park: The Devils in the Desert Jurassic Park: The Devils in the Desert #1–4 104 pages 1-60010-923-3
Jurassic Park: Dangerous Games Jurassic Park: Dangerous Games #1–5 112 pages 1-61377-002-2
Classic Jurassic Park Volume 1 Jurassic Park #1–4 104 pages 1-60010-760-5
Classic Jurassic Park Volume 2: Raptors' Revenge Juassic Park #0, Jurassic Park: Raptor #1–2, Jurassic Park: Raptors Attack #1–4 192 pages 1-60010-885-7
Classic Jurassic Park Volume 3: Amazon Adventure! Jurassic Park: Raptors Hijack #1–4, Jurassic Park Annual #1 124 pages 1-61377-042-1
Classic Jurassic Park Volume 4: Return to Jurassic Park Part 1 Return to Jurassic Park #1–4 128 pages 1-61377-117-7
Classic Jurassic Park Volume 5: Return to Jurassic Park Part 2 Return to Jurassic Park #5–9 108 pages 978-1613775332
Classic Jurassic Park Volume 6: The Lost World The Lost World: Jurassic Park #1–4 104 pages 978-1613779156

Motion comic series[edit]

In late 2019, a Jurassic World motion comic series was released by Universal on YouTube. The four-part series is set after the events of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom and explores various dinosaur attacks throughout the world.[295][296][297]

Video games[edit]

Since 1993, numerous Jurassic Park video games have been produced. To accompany the release of the first film, Sega and Ocean Software published several different games for various consoles, including the NES and Sega Genesis. In 1994, Ocean produced a game sequel titled Jurassic Park 2: The Chaos Continues, while Sega released Jurassic Park: Rampage Edition. In addition, Universal Interactive Studios produced Jurassic Park Interactive for the 3DO system.

In 1997, several games were released for the second film in the franchise, including some by DreamWorks Interactive. A subsequent game, Trespasser, was released as a "digital sequel" to The Lost World: Jurassic Park. The player assumes the role of Anne, who is the sole survivor of a plane crash on InGen's "Site B" one year after the events of the film. It was released for Microsoft Windows in 1998. The third film spawned six video games for PC and Game Boy Advance. A number of lightgun arcade games were also released for all three films.

Jurassic Park: The Game is an episodic video game that takes place during and after the events of the original film. It follows a new group of survivors trying to escape Isla Nublar. It was developed by Telltale Games in a deal with Universal[298] and was released in 2011.

Lego Jurassic World is a 2015 action-adventure video game developed by Traveller's Tales and published by Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. It follows the plots of the series' first four films.

Several park-building games have been released, including Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis (2003), Jurassic World: The Game (2015), Jurassic World Evolution (2018),[299] and Jurassic World Evolution 2 (2021).[300]

Jurassic World Aftermath, a virtual reality game, was released in 2020.[301]

Attractions[edit]

Theme park rides[edit]

Several water rides based on the series have opened at Universal's theme parks. On June 21, 1996, Universal Studios Hollywood opened Jurassic Park: The Ride. Universal Studios Japan later opened this attraction, and Universal's Islands of Adventure opened Jurassic Park River Adventure. The rides are heavily themed on the first three films. Another ride based on the series has also been opened at Universal Studios Singapore (Jurassic Park Rapids Adventure). In 2018, Jurassic Park: The Ride at Universal Studios Hollywood closed for preparations to become Jurassic World: The Ride, which opened on July 12, 2019. A roller coaster, known as VelociCoaster, opened at Universal's Islands of Adventure in June 2021.[302]

Exhibitions[edit]

In June 1993, the American Museum of Natural History in New York debuted The Dinosaurs of Jurassic Park, an exhibition featuring dinosaurs that were created for use in the first film. The exhibition opening coincided with the film.[303][304] Other museums were threatened with legal action for using the word "Jurassic" in exhibit titles.[305]

A travelling exhibition, The Lost World: The Life and Death of Dinosaurs, went on tour in 1997. The exhibit was produced in connection with the second film, and its centerpiece was a 70-foot-long recreation of a Mamenchisaurus, a dinosaur featured in the film.[306][307][308][309]

Another travelling exhibit, The Dinosaurs of Jurassic Park and The Lost World,[nb 4] went on tour in 1998. It was created by Don Lessem, and featured dinosaurs that were made for the first two films, as well as sets and props, and a video narrated by Jeff Goldblum.[312][313][314] It also featured the 70-foot Mamenchisaurus.[310] The exhibit was ongoing as of 2001.[311]

Jurassic Park: The Life and Death of Dinosaurs was an exhibition that traveled around the United States during 2002. It was also created by Lessem and included dinosaur sculptures from the films, as well as cast skeletons and fossils.[315][316][317]

In 2001,[318] Universal Studios and Amblin Entertainment created the Jurassic Park Institute, an educational program that included a website, as well as travelling dinosaur exhibits in later years.[319][320][321] The exhibit toured in Japan under the name Jurassic Park Institute Tour,[322][323][324] and a video game, Jurassic Park Institute Tour: Dinosaur Rescue, was released to accompany it.[325] The tour, designed by Thinkwell Design & Production,[326] won a Thea award in 2005 for Outstanding Achievement.[327]

Jurassic World: The Exhibition was located at the Melbourne Museum in Australia for six months during 2016.[328][329][330] The travelling exhibition was also held in 2017, at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia,[331][332] and at the Field Museum in Chicago.[333][334] A new North American tour was launched in 2021,[335] starting in Texas.[336][337]

Live show[edit]

A live show, titled Jurassic World Live, started touring in 2019.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d As described in the novels.
  2. ^ As described in the films, Jurassic Park and The Lost World: Jurassic Park.
  3. ^ Biosyn appears in the 1994 video games Jurassic Park (for the Sega CD)[28] and Jurassic Park 2: The Chaos Continues (for the Super NES).[29] It is also referenced in the subsequent games Trespasser and Jurassic World Evolution.[30]
  4. ^ Also known as The Dinosaurs of Jurassic Park: The Lost World.[310][311]

References[edit]

  1. ^
  2. ^ "Jurassic Park Re-release". The Hollywood Reporter. Universal. Archived from the original on May 1, 2012. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  3. ^ Acuna, Kirsten (June 14, 2015). "'Jurassic World' is the first movie ever to crack $500 million in its opening weekend". Business Insider. Archived from the original on February 2, 2018. Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  4. ^ "2015 Worldwide Box Office". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved July 19, 2022.
  5. ^ a b "Top Lifetime Grosses". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved July 19, 2022.
  6. ^ "2018 Worldwide Box Office". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved July 19, 2022.
  7. ^ "2022 Worldwide Box Office". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved August 29, 2022.
  8. ^ "'Jurassic World Dominion' Slowly but Surely Crosses $1 Billion Globally". Variety. September 23, 2022.
  9. ^ "Dino-Might: 'Jurassic World Dominion' Crosses $1B At Worldwide Box Office". Deadline Hollywood. September 23, 2022.
  10. ^ "Box Office: 'Jurassic World Dominion' Passes $1 Billion Worldwide". Forbes. September 23, 2022.
  11. ^ Ginnekin, Van (August 29, 2007). Screening Difference: How Hollywood's Blockbuster Films Imagine Race. p. 11. ISBN 9781461643296. Archived from the original on September 19, 2021. Retrieved January 24, 2017.
  12. ^ "Movie Franchises". The Numbers. Retrieved August 29, 2022.
  13. ^ "'Jurassic' Franchise Tops $6B Global, 'Dominion' At $990.4M WW – International Box Office". Deadline Hollywood. August 29, 2022.
  14. ^ Kutner, Max (December 2, 2014). "The Scientist Behind "Jurassic World", Jack Horner, Breaks Down the Movie's Thrilling Trailer". Smithsonian. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  15. ^ a b c d Stack, Tim (June 22, 2018). "Jurassic World: Colin Trevorrow answers Fallen Kingdom burning questions". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on December 5, 2018. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  16. ^ Giardina, Carolyn (June 13, 2015). "How 'Jurassic Park' Revolutionized Visual Effects, Inspiring 'Jurassic World'". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  17. ^ Anderton, Ethan (April 23, 2018). "'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom' Has More Animatronic Dinosaurs Than Any 'Jurassic Park' Sequel". /Film. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  18. ^ Phipps, Keith (June 22, 2018). "How Jurassic Park Changed the Way Movies Looked at Dinosaurs". Vulture. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  19. ^ Waxman, Olivia B. (June 22, 2018). "The Real Scientific History Behind the 'Jurassic Park' Dinosaurs". Time. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  20. ^ Qiu, Linda; Vergano, Dan (November 26, 2014). "'Jurassic World' Dinosaurs Stuck in the 1980s, Experts Grumble". National Geographic. Archived from the original on December 6, 2014.
  21. ^ Conway, John (December 4, 2014). "Scientists disappointed Jurassic World dinosaurs don't look like dinosaurs". The Guardian. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  22. ^ Kelly, Stephen (June 5, 2018). "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom and the long history of dodgy dinos". Wired UK. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  23. ^ Anderton, Ethan (June 10, 2021). "'Jurassic World: Dominion' Finally Has Feathered Dinosaurs - Here's How They Got the Details Right". /Film. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  24. ^ Kirk H. Beetz, Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction: biography & resources (Beacham Pub., 1996), 2238 Archived February 2, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.
  25. ^ Nigel Morris, The Cinema of Steven Spielberg: Empire of Light (Wallflower Press, 2007), 249. Archived February 2, 2017, at the Wayback Machine
  26. ^ Ken Gelder, Popular Fiction: The Logics and Practices of a Literary Field (Routledge, 2004), 113 Archived February 2, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.
  27. ^ a b Sneider, Jeff. "Exclusive: 'Jurassic World: Dominion' Adds Campbell Scott as Key Character from Original Movie". Collider. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  28. ^ Sega (1994). Jurassic Park (Sega CD).
  29. ^ "Test Jurassic Park Part 2 : The Chaos Continues". Jeuxvideo.com (in French). November 4, 2011. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  30. ^ "Jurassic World 3 Theory: Biosyn Returns Because of InGen's Failure". ScreenRant. November 28, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  31. ^ Travis, Ben (April 9, 2022). "Jurassic World Dominion's Huge New Dinosaur The 'Giga' Is 'Like The Joker', Says Colin Trevorrow – Exclusive Image". Empire. Retrieved May 30, 2022.
  32. ^ "Dinotracker website". Retrieved May 30, 2022.
  33. ^ a b Busch, Jenna (June 6, 2022). "Jurassic World Dominion Director Colin Trevorrow On Feathered Dinos And Combining Casts". /Film. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  34. ^ a b c d Travis, Ben; De Semlyen, Nick (July 3, 2018). "18 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Secrets from JA Bayona and Colin Trevorrow". Empire. Archived from the original on November 22, 2018. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  35. ^ Miner, Meghan (June 9, 2015). "Hawaii scenery stars in new Jurassic World movie". Hawaii Magazine. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  36. ^ Krupa, Daniel (October 26, 2015). "I Visited Jurassic World in Real Life". IGN. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  37. ^ Medd, James (June 10, 2018). "Where 'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom' was filmed in Hawaii". CN Traveller. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  38. ^ Shay, Don; Duncan, Jody (1993). The Making of Jurassic Park. Ballantine Books. pp. 91–105. ISBN 978-0-345-38122-4. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  39. ^ Sciretta, Peter (April 28, 2015). "50 Things I Learned On The Set Of Jurassic World". /Film. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  40. ^ a b Dockery, Daniel (June 25, 2018). "The answer to everyone's biggest Jurassic Park question". Syfy Wire. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved February 18, 2021.
  41. ^ Scott, Ryan (June 22, 2018). "What Happened to Site B and Its Dinosaurs in Jurassic World 2?". MovieWeb. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  42. ^ "Pre-Production section". Lost-World.com. Archived from the original on October 19, 2019.
  43. ^ "Return to Jurassic Park: Finding The Lost World", The Lost World: Jurassic Park Blu-Ray
  44. ^ "Chase, Crush and Devour". American Society of Cinematographers. June 1997. pp. 1–4. Archived from the original on March 6, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  45. ^ TenBruggencate, Jan (December 20, 1996). "'Jurassic' sequel films on Kauai". Honolulu Star-Advertiser. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  46. ^ "Kauai is last-minute location for 'Lost World' picnic scene". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. December 20, 1996. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  47. ^ Kieszkowski, Elizabeth (September 2, 2000). "Media gain access to 'Jurassic Park III' set". The Honolulu Advertiser. Archived from the original on October 18, 2000.
  48. ^ "Jurassic Park 3: Production Notes". Cinema.com. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  49. ^ a b c "Jurassic Park". MichaelCrichton.com. Archived from the original on November 21, 2008. Retrieved January 1, 2009.
  50. ^ Michael Crichton (2001). Michael Crichton on the Jurassic Park Phenomenon (DVD). Universal.
  51. ^ Jurassic Park DVD Production Notes
  52. ^ Appelo, Tim (December 7, 1990). "Leaping Lizards". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on October 13, 2007. Retrieved February 17, 2007.
  53. ^ Jurassic Park – Movie Reviews, Trailers, Pictures – Rotten Tomatoes Archived June 26, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. Rottentomatoes.com. Retrieved on September 4, 2012.
  54. ^ "Jurassic Park (1993)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on June 28, 2015. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  55. ^ a b The Lost World: Jurassic Park DVD Special Features – Production Notes
  56. ^ The Lost World Archived September 3, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. MichaelCrichton.com. Retrieved on September 4, 2012.
  57. ^ "The Lost World Jurassic Park (1997)". British Film Institute. Archived from the original on October 22, 2008. Retrieved July 7, 2007.
  58. ^ "The Evolution of Claire (Jurassic World)". PenguinRandomhouse.com. Retrieved March 15, 2019.
  59. ^ Squires, John (April 9, 2018). "Check Out Cover and Synopsis for 'Jurassic World' Prequel Novel 'The Evolution of Claire'". Bloody Disgusting. Archived from the original on June 20, 2019. Retrieved March 15, 2019.
  60. ^ Ryfle, Steve (1998). Japan's Favorite Mon-star: The Unauthorized Biography of "The Big G". ECW Press. pp. 15–17. ISBN 9781550223484.
  61. ^ "Jurassic Park Turns 21: A Look Back at How It Revolutionized Special Effects". Wired. June 10, 2014.
  62. ^ "Here's how Jurassic Park changed the special effects game". The A.V. Club. June 11, 2014.
  63. ^ "How 'Jurassic Park' Changed Special Effects Forever". Insider. June 13, 2014.
  64. ^ "Critic's Picks: 10 Landmark CGI-Meets-Live-Action Movies". The Hollywood Reporter. April 15, 2016.
  65. ^ "The 50 greatest special effects movies of all time: Jurassic Park (1993)". The A.V. Club. July 26, 2018.
  66. ^ "From 'Avatar' to 'Jurassic Park' : 10 Great Films That Have Timeless Visual Effects". Collider. June 30, 2022.
  67. ^ "The Box Office Legacy Of 'Jurassic Park,' 20 Years Later". Forbes. April 5, 2013.
  68. ^ Caetano, J.M.V., Ponciano, L.C.M.O. (2021). Cultural Geology, Cultural Biology, Cultural Taxonomy, and the Intangible Geoheritage as New Strategies for Geoconservation. Geoheritage 13, 79. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12371-021-00603-6 Archived September 19, 2021, at the Wayback Machine
  69. ^ "'Jurassic Park' to be re-released in 3D". NME. March 17, 2012. Archived from the original on June 15, 2012. Retrieved November 25, 2012.
  70. ^ Rich, Katey (March 16, 2012). "Jurassic Park 3D Coming To Theaters In July 2013". Cinema Blend. Archived from the original on January 20, 2013. Retrieved November 25, 2012.
  71. ^ Armitage, Hugh (March 16, 2012). "'Jurassic Park 3D' coming in 2013". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on September 14, 2012. Retrieved November 25, 2012.
  72. ^ Kimmelman, Ruben (December 12, 2018). "'Jurassic Park', 'The Shining', And 23 Other Movies Added To National Film Registry". NPR. Archived from the original on December 20, 2018. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  73. ^ "The Lost World Is Steven Spielberg's Most Profoundly Okay Movie". IGN. June 7, 2022.
  74. ^ "25 Years Later, The Lost World Is the Best Jurassic Park Sequel". Comingsoon.net. June 7, 2022.
  75. ^ "The Lost World Remains the Best Jurassic Park Sequel". The Escapist. June 17, 2022.
  76. ^ The Making of Jurassic Park III (DVD). Universal Pictures. 2005.
  77. ^ Ryan, Tim (August 25, 2000). "Cameras roll soon for Jurassic Park III". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. Archived from the original on October 18, 2000.
  78. ^ "Jurassic Park III production notes: Dinos Everywhere". CinemaReview.com. Archived from the original on January 6, 2016. Retrieved April 27, 2016.
  79. ^ "Two Decades Later, Jurassic Park 3 Is a Chaotic, Black Sheep Time Capsule". Paste. June 9, 2022. Retrieved July 5, 2022.
  80. ^ "Jurassic Park III Feels Like a Sequel From a Bygone Era". IGN. June 8, 2022. Retrieved July 5, 2022.
  81. ^ "Jurassic Park IV Update". TheZReview.co.uk. June 12, 2002. Archived from the original on November 2, 2002.
  82. ^ Linder, Brian (November 7, 2002). "Jurassic Park IV Goes Ahead". IGN. Archived from the original on December 8, 2006. Retrieved December 10, 2014.
  83. ^ McNary, Dave; Diorio, Carl (December 22, 2002). "Early-bird specials". Variety. Archived from the original on October 11, 2007. Retrieved December 10, 2014.
  84. ^ "More on JPIV". IGN.com. January 30, 2003. Archived from the original on November 2, 2014. Retrieved December 10, 2014.
  85. ^ "Jurassic Park 4 plot details?". MovieWeb.com. January 31, 2003. Archived from the original on November 25, 2014. Retrieved December 10, 2014.
  86. ^ a b Davidson, Paul (July 11, 2003). "Sam Neill Confirms Jurassic Park IV". IGN.com. Archived from the original on December 8, 2006. Retrieved December 10, 2014.
  87. ^ Goldberg, Matt (October 12, 2012). "Check out the Humanosaurus Concept Art for Scrapped Jurassic Park 4 Script". Collider. Archived from the original on November 30, 2014. Retrieved December 10, 2014.
  88. ^ "Humanosaurus, a cross between human being and dinosaur". Stan Winston School of Character Arts. June 24, 2015. Archived from the original on August 7, 2015. Retrieved August 8, 2015. Image: conceptual artwork by creature designer Carlos Huante for JURASSIC PARK 4, drawn early in project's development.
  89. ^ Huante, Carlos (November 4, 2020). "Jp4 and Jurassic fight club". YouTube. 35:00. Archived from the original on July 17, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2020.
  90. ^ "An Interview with Shelly Johnson, ASC". Jurassic Outpost. June 27, 2020. 1:23:00. Archived from the original on August 6, 2021. Retrieved November 12, 2020.
  91. ^ "Jurassic IV Draft Done". Sci Fi Wire. July 13, 2003. Archived from the original on July 27, 2003.
  92. ^ "Jurass Park Quattro – Guess who will be back!". AintItCool.com. September 19, 2003. Archived from the original on April 1, 2004.
  93. ^ "Knightley Confirms JP4 Talks?". CountingDown.com. July 14, 2003. Archived from the original on July 3, 2004. There were actually two roles in Jurassic Park IV Steven thought I might fit. First there was the granddaughter part, which wasn't all that big a role, she was only in it at the beginning. The other part he was considering for me was substantially larger, but I won't go into any details in case I make Steven angry (laughs).
  94. ^ Otto, Jeff. "Exclusive Interview with John Sayles". Reelz.com. Archived from the original on December 14, 2014. Retrieved December 10, 2014.
  95. ^ Franklin, Garth (May 12, 2004). "News Bites: Wednesday, May 12th 2004". DarkHorizons.com. Archived from the original on September 24, 2014. Retrieved December 10, 2014.
  96. ^ Moriarty (August 17, 2004). "AICN Exclusive!! Moriarty's Been to 'Jurassic Park 4' and Returns to Tell the Tale!!". AintItCool.com. Archived from the original on February 6, 2005.
  97. ^ Sayles, John (2004). "Jurassic Park IV" (PDF). Jurassic Outpost. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 5, 2016.
  98. ^ Bruder, Jessica (May 30, 2005). "Sayles' people". The New York Observer. Archived from the original on September 23, 2014.
  99. ^ "Jack Horner on the state of Jurassic Park 4!!!". AintItCool.com. January 28, 2006. Archived from the original on November 2, 2014. Retrieved December 10, 2014.
  100. ^ "Frank Marshall On Eight Below, Indy IV and Jurassic Park". Empire. April 2006. Archived from the original on July 8, 2006.
  101. ^ Holleran, Scott (June 24, 2006). "Interview: Producer and Director Frank Marshall". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on August 13, 2006.
  102. ^ "'Jurassic Park IV' News". Collider.com. April 5, 2007. Archived from the original on August 10, 2014.
  103. ^ Paul Davidson (February 21, 2006). "Jurassic Park IV Script Ready". IGN. Archived from the original on December 7, 2006. Retrieved December 10, 2014.
  104. ^ Douglas, Edward (December 6, 2007). "Frank Marshall on Indy 4... and Bourne 4???". ComingSoon.com. Archived from the original on December 8, 2007.
  105. ^ Porsa, Dan (October 16, 2013). "Talking OLDBOY With Mark Protosevich at NYCC". This is Infamous. Archived from the original on November 6, 2014. Retrieved December 10, 2014.
  106. ^ Bettinger, Brendan (n.d.). "'Rise of the Planet of the Apes' Writers Rick Jaffa and Amanda Silver to Script 'Jurassic Park 4". Collider.com. Archived from the original on March 4, 2013. Retrieved August 20, 2013.
  107. ^ "Jurassic Park 4 Gets a Director (Hint: It's Not Steven Spielberg)". E! Online. Archived from the original on March 17, 2013. Retrieved March 15, 2013.
  108. ^ "Jurassic Park 4 to be directed by Colin Trevorrow". March 15, 2013. Archived from the original on May 7, 2013. Retrieved June 21, 2018 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  109. ^ "Steven Spielberg's 'Jurassic World' to Hit Theaters in June 2015". TheWrap. September 10, 2013. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved August 5, 2014.
  110. ^ "DEVISING A NEW ASPECT RATIO FOR THE DINOSAURS OF JURASSIC WORLD". Panavision. Archived from the original on July 27, 2019. Retrieved July 27, 2019.
  111. ^ ""Jurassic World" reviews: What critics are saying". CBS News. June 11, 2015.
  112. ^ "'Jurassic World': What the Critics Are Saying". The Hollywood Reporter. June 11, 2015.
  113. ^ "'Jurassic World': What did the critics say?". Entertainment Weekly. June 12, 2015.
  114. ^ "'Jurassic Park 4' Titled 'Jurassic World'; Gets Summer 2015 Release Date". Screen Rant. September 10, 2013. Archived from the original on May 28, 2014. Retrieved August 5, 2014.
  115. ^ "'Jurassic World' Director Offers Filming Details and Confirms Returning Character". Screenrant.com. March 18, 2014. Archived from the original on May 28, 2014. Retrieved August 5, 2014.
  116. ^ "Totally Laime". Elizabeth Laime. September 19, 2014. Archived from the original on November 13, 2014. Retrieved September 19, 2014.
  117. ^ Gross, Rachel E. (June 16, 2016). "How Impossible, Actually, Is the Dinosaur DNA Splicing in Jurassic World?". Slate. Archived from the original on November 4, 2016. Retrieved November 3, 2016.
  118. ^ "See the Indominus Rex roar in Jurassic World now..." universalpichomeent.tumblr.com. Archived from the original on August 13, 2018. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  119. ^ Karmali, Luke (August 13, 2015). "Jurassic World Sequel Opening in UK Cinemas Before US". IGN. Archived from the original on August 26, 2015. Retrieved August 27, 2015.
  120. ^ a b c Rebecca Ford (July 23, 2015). "'Jurassic World 2' Set for 2018". The Hollywood Reporter. (Prometheus Global Media). Archived from the original on July 24, 2015. Retrieved July 24, 2015.
  121. ^ a b "Colin Trevorrow Talks Jurassic World 2 and More! (Surprise Guest: J.A. Bayona!)". Jurassic Outpost. September 30, 2016. Archived from the original on October 1, 2016. Retrieved September 30, 2016.
  122. ^ a b "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom–Production Information" (PDF). Universal Pictures. May 2018. pp. 1–3. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 27, 2018. Retrieved June 26, 2018.
  123. ^ a b Weintraub, Steve (June 13, 2015). "Jurassic World: Colin Trevorrow Talks Building a Foundation for Future Installments". Collider.com. 4:30–7:58. Archived from the original on June 15, 2015. Retrieved June 13, 2015.
  124. ^ a b Phil de Semlyen (April 23, 2014). "Exclusive: Jurassic World Sequels Planned". Empire. Archived from the original on June 17, 2015. Retrieved May 31, 2015.
  125. ^ "Colin Trevorrow Not Directing the Next Jurassic Park Film". ComingSoon.net. May 31, 2015. Archived from the original on June 2, 2015. Retrieved May 31, 2015.
  126. ^ Masters, Kim (June 15, 2016). "Steven Spielberg, Kathleen Kennedy and Frank Marshall on How to Win in Hollywood Today". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on June 17, 2016. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  127. ^ Trumbore, Dave (February 24, 2017). "'Untitled Jurassic World Sequel' Officially Starts Filming". Collider. Archived from the original on February 25, 2017. Retrieved February 24, 2017.
  128. ^ Bayona, JA (July 8, 2017). "This is a wrap for Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom! What a journey! Thank you to everyone that made it possible!". Twitter. Archived from the original on July 10, 2017. Retrieved July 9, 2017.
  129. ^ "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom reviews are mixed, but praise director J.A. Bayona". Entertainment Weekly. June 5, 2018.
  130. ^ "'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom' — What the Critics Are Saying". The Hollywood Reporter. June 5, 2018.
  131. ^ "'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom' Reviews: What the Critics Are Saying". Variety. June 5, 2018.
  132. ^ a b c d Reilly, Nick (November 9, 2020). "'Jurassic World: Dominion' wraps filming in the UK after Covid-19 delays". NME. Archived from the original on November 14, 2020. Retrieved November 12, 2020.
  133. ^ "Universal launches plans for third 'Jurassic World' film". ABC. Associated Press. February 21, 2018. Archived from the original on February 22, 2018. Retrieved February 21, 2018.
  134. ^ Kroll, Justin (February 21, 2018). "'Jurassic World 3' to Hit Theaters in June 2021". Variety. Archived from the original on February 21, 2018. Retrieved February 21, 2018.
  135. ^ Romano, Nick (February 21, 2018). "Jurassic World 3 rampaging toward 2021 release date". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on February 21, 2018. Retrieved February 21, 2018.
  136. ^ Yasharoff, Hannah (September 25, 2019). "Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum and Sam Neill to return for 'major roles' in 'Jurassic World 3'". USA Today. Archived from the original on November 9, 2019. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  137. ^ Whalen, Andrew (December 10, 2019). "'Jurassic Park' Cast Reunite Before 'Jurassic World 3' in New 'Jurassic World Evolution' Expansion". Newsweek. Archived from the original on January 3, 2020. Retrieved February 25, 2020.
  138. ^ Travis, Ben (October 28, 2019). "Colin Trevorrow On Bringing Back Jurassic Park's Iconic Trio In Jurassic World 3". Empire. Archived from the original on February 15, 2020. Retrieved February 25, 2020.
  139. ^ Sneider, Jeff (November 7, 2019). "Exclusive: 'Jurassic World 3' Bringing Back Justice Smith, Daniella Pineda". Collider. Archived from the original on January 9, 2020. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  140. ^ Sneider, Jeff (February 13, 2020). "'Jurassic World 3' Bringing Back Jake Johnson and Omar Sy". Collider. Archived from the original on February 14, 2020. Retrieved February 14, 2020.
  141. ^ N'Duka, Amanda (October 17, 2019). "'Jurassic World 3' Adds 'Sorry for Your Loss' Actor Mamoudou Athie". Deadline. Archived from the original on October 17, 2019. Retrieved October 17, 2019.
  142. ^ Kroll, Justin (October 18, 2019). "'Jurassic World 3' Casts DeWanda Wise in Leading Role (Exclusive)". Variety. Archived from the original on December 5, 2019. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  143. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (February 18, 2020). "'Jurassic World 3': 'Altered Carbon' & 'Animal Kingdom' Actress Dichen Lachman Joins Cast". Deadline. Archived from the original on February 18, 2020. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  144. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (February 19, 2020). "'Jurassic World 3': 'Venom' & 'Antlers' Actor Scott Haze Joins Colin Trevorrow Pic". Deadline. Archived from the original on February 20, 2020. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  145. ^ Sneider, Jeff (June 25, 2020). "Exclusive: 'Jurassic World: Dominion' Adds Campbell Scott as Key Character from Original Movie". Collider. Archived from the original on June 26, 2020. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  146. ^ Douglas, Edward (September 10, 2016). "Exclusive: Jurassic World Confirmed as a Trilogy". LRM Online. Archived from the original on September 14, 2016. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  147. ^ a b c Stack, Tim (April 18, 2018). "Jurassic World 3 will be a 'science thriller,' says Colin Trevorrow". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on April 21, 2018. Retrieved April 18, 2018.
  148. ^ a b c d Sciretta, Peter (June 26, 2018). "Exclusive: Colin Trevorrow Explains the 'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom' Ending, Teases Where 'Jurassic World 3' Will Go". /Film. Archived from the original on December 5, 2018. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  149. ^ Anderton, Ethan (December 14, 2018). "Sorry, But 'Jurassic World 3' Won't Have Dinosaurs Attacking Cities". /Film. Archived from the original on December 19, 2018. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  150. ^ Williams, Owen (December 17, 2018). "Colin Trevorrow Says Jurassic World 3 Won't Be A Dino-War Movie". Empire. Archived from the original on December 17, 2018. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  151. ^ Wiseman, Andreas (November 7, 2020). "'Jurassic World: Dominion' Wraps Unprecedented Shoot After 18 Months, 40,000 COVID Tests & Millions On Protocols; Colin Trevorrow & Donna Langley On The 'Emotional' Journey". Deadline. Archived from the original on November 7, 2020. Retrieved November 12, 2020.
  152. ^ Kroll, Justin (March 13, 2020). "Universal Halts Production on Live-Action Films Including 'Jurassic World: Dominion' Due to Coronavirus". Variety. Archived from the original on March 14, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  153. ^ Grater, Tom (July 10, 2020). "'Jurassic World: Dominion' UK Shoot On Track in Week One; Universal Says No Disruption After Reports Of Positive COVID Tests". Deadline. Archived from the original on July 10, 2020. Retrieved July 10, 2020.
  154. ^ "'Jurassic World Dominion': Meet the Franchise's New Dinosaurs, From Its Biggest Ever Foe to Feathered Predators". Variety. June 11, 2022. Retrieved July 2, 2022.
  155. ^ "Jurassic World Dominion Director Colin Trevorrow Reveals Which Dinosaurs Are Animatronics". ComicBook.com. June 10, 2022. Retrieved July 2, 2022.
  156. ^ "'Jurassic World: Dominion': How the Giganotosaurus Became the Joker of the Franchise". IndieWire. June 25, 2022. Retrieved July 2, 2022.
  157. ^ "The Real Story Behind Jurassic World Dominion's Dino Feathers". Wired. June 10, 2022. Retrieved July 2, 2022.
  158. ^ "'Jurassic World Dominion' Brings The Thrills... And Feathered Dinosaurs". Forbes. June 10, 2022. Retrieved July 2, 2022.
  159. ^ "'Jurassic World Dominion' Draws Mixed First Reactions and Largely Negative Reviews". Variety. June 6, 2022. Retrieved July 2, 2022.
  160. ^ "Jurassic World Dominion Reviews Are Online, And Critics Have A Lot To Say About The Blockbuster Sequel". CinemaBlend. June 9, 2022. Retrieved July 2, 2022.
  161. ^ "'Jurassic World: Dominion' is 'the worst' in the franchise, critics say". CNBC. June 10, 2022. Retrieved July 2, 2022.
  162. ^ "'Jurassic World Dominion' Extended Cut Set for Digital and Blu-ray Release This Month". TheWrap. August 9, 2022.
  163. ^ "'Jurassic World Dominion' Extended Edition Adds 14-Minutes of Epic Footage". Collider. August 9, 2022.
  164. ^ "'Jurassic World Dominion' Extended Edition Review: Fan Service and Fun Make for a Dino-sized Good Time". Collider. August 15, 2022.
  165. ^ "Jurassic World Dominion's Extended Version Is Definitely Better". Screen Rant. August 19, 2022.
  166. ^ "Jurassic World Dominion's Extended Scenes, And How They Improve The Movie". CinemaBlend. September 4, 2022.
  167. ^ Anderton, Ethan (January 20, 2021). "'Jurassic World: Dominion' Is A Celebration Of The Entire 'Jurassic Park' Franchise, Says Colin Trevorrow". /Film. Retrieved April 16, 2022.
  168. ^ a b Schaefer, Sandy (January 31, 2022). "Jurassic World Dominion Ends The Trilogy, But There Could Be More Jurassic Movies To Come". /Film. Retrieved April 16, 2022.
  169. ^ Dick, Jeremy (April 14, 2022). "Jurassic World Dominion Poster Teases the Epic Conclusion of the Jurassic Era". MovieWeb. Retrieved April 16, 2022.
  170. ^ Chitwood, Adam (May 22, 2020). "Exclusive: 'Jurassic World: Dominion' Will Be the "Start of a New Era" Says Producer Frank Marshall". Collider. Archived from the original on May 25, 2020. Retrieved May 22, 2020.
  171. ^ Kaye, Don (May 17, 2022). "How Jurassic World Dominion Finally Gives Laura Dern Her Due". Den of Geek. Retrieved May 19, 2022.
  172. ^ Jackson, Angelique (May 25, 2022). "The Feminist Evolution of 'Jurassic World Dominion': How Laura Dern, Bryce Dallas Howard and DeWanda Wise Became Summer's Breakout Action Stars". Variety. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  173. ^ Taylor, Drew (June 8, 2022). "Colin Trevorrow Explains How He Crafted 'Jurassic World: Dominion' as Ellie Sattler's Story". The Wrap. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  174. ^ Freitag, Lee (May 31, 2022). "Most - But Not All - Jurassic World Stars Believe Dominion Will Be Their Last Trip to the Park". CBR. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  175. ^ Mau, Alison (December 6, 2020). "A New Zealand treasure - Sam Neill on why he is refusing to die". Stuff. Retrieved June 8, 2022.
  176. ^ a b c Weintraub, Steve (September 11, 2019). "Exclusive: Colin Trevorrow on How He Secretly Made the 'Jurassic World' Short Film 'Battle at Big Rock'". Collider. Archived from the original on September 11, 2019. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  177. ^ Whitbrook, James (September 10, 2019). "Out of Nowhere, a New Jurassic World Short Film Is Hitting FX This Weekend". io9. Archived from the original on September 11, 2019. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  178. ^ Purslow, Matt (November 23, 2021). "Jurassic World Dominion Prologue Breakdown with Director Colin Trevorrow". IGN. Retrieved November 23, 2021.
  179. ^ Weintraub, Steve (June 11, 2021). "Colin Trevorrow Teases New 'Jurassic World: Dominion' Plot Details, Breaks Down IMAX Preview". Collider. Retrieved November 23, 2021.
  180. ^ "Everything Added In The Jurassic World Dominion Extended Version". Screen Rant. August 18, 2022.
  181. ^ Milligan, Mercedes (November 8, 2018). "Two-Part 'LEGO Jurassic World: The Secret Exhibit' Roars to NBC Nov. 29". Animation Magazine. Archived from the original on October 21, 2019. Retrieved September 13, 2019.
  182. ^ Milligan, Mercedes (August 21, 2019). "First Look: Nick Assembles 'LEGO Jurassic World' Mini-Series 'Legend of Isla Nublar'". Animation Magazine. Archived from the original on September 13, 2019. Retrieved September 13, 2019.
  183. ^ "LEGO Jurassic World: Legend of Isla Nublar roars onto Family Channel". ToonBarn. July 14, 2019. Archived from the original on December 27, 2019. Retrieved August 9, 2019.
  184. ^ Goldberg, Leslie (June 4, 2019). "'Jurassic World' Animated Series Set at Netflix". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on June 4, 2019. Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  185. ^ Pedersen, Erik (July 28, 2020). "'Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous': Premiere Date & Teaser For Netflix Toon Series From EPs Steven Spielberg, Colin Trevorrow & Frank Marshall". Deadline. Archived from the original on July 28, 2020. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  186. ^ "The Gates of Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous Open September 18 Only on Netflix". Universal Brand Development. Archived from the original on September 19, 2021. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  187. ^ "Live-Action 'Jurassic World' Series in Development with Justin Falvey and Darryl Frank at Amblin TV!". Jurassic Outpost. March 7, 2020. Archived from the original on March 8, 2020. Retrieved March 7, 2020.
  188. ^ "Jurassic World: Live-Action Spinoff Series Reportedly In Development". CBR.com. March 7, 2020. Archived from the original on March 8, 2020. Retrieved March 7, 2020.
  189. ^ "JURASSIC WORLD Live-Action TV Series Reportedly In The Works From Amblin Television". ComicBookMovie.com. March 7, 2020. Archived from the original on March 8, 2020. Retrieved March 7, 2020.
  190. ^ Scott, Ryan (January 31, 2022). "Jurassic World TV Show Has Not Been Discussed, Producer Frank Marshall Confirms". /Film. Retrieved April 16, 2022.
  191. ^ a b c "'Jurassic' series?". The San Bernardino Sun. June 17, 1993. Archived from the original on December 20, 2016. Retrieved December 20, 2016.
  192. ^ Pugh, Chris (June 1, 2016). "Escape from Jurassic Park – 1993 animated series detailed". JurassicOutpost.com. Archived from the original on July 6, 2016. Retrieved July 3, 2016.
  193. ^ Squires, John (December 6, 2016). "Art and Story Details from Cancelled 'Jurassic Park' Animated Series Finally Surface". Bloody Disgusting. Archived from the original on December 8, 2016. Retrieved December 6, 2016.
  194. ^ Scott, Ryan (December 6, 2016). "Canceled Jurassic Park Animated Series Full Season Details Revealed". MovieWeb. Archived from the original on December 8, 2016. Retrieved December 6, 2016.
  195. ^ Pugh, Chris (December 5, 2016). "The Entire First Season of the Cancelled Jurassic Park Television Series Revealed (Exclusive)". Jurassic Outpost. Archived from the original on December 7, 2016. Retrieved December 6, 2016.
  196. ^ a b Stout, William (April 26, 2014). "My Top Ten Favorite Dinosaur Films – Part One". WilliamStout.com. Archived from the original on November 6, 2015. Retrieved June 25, 2015.
  197. ^ Duffy, Mike (July 15, 1993). "Dinosaur TV 'toons are extinct for now". The Indianapolis Star. Archived from the original on December 20, 2016. Retrieved December 20, 2016.
  198. ^ Finkelstein, Dan (July 20, 1997). "What's New". Dan's The Lost World Page. Archived from the original on June 3, 2000.
  199. ^ Finkelstein, Dan (July 22, 1997). "What's New". Dan's The Lost World Page. Archived from the original on June 3, 2000.
  200. ^ "Canceled The Lost World: Jurassic Park - Animated Series". May 30, 2019. Archived from the original on April 28, 2021. Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  201. ^ a b c Finkelstein, Dan (November 11, 1997). "Chaos Effect". Dan's The Lost World Page. Archived from the original on September 9, 1999.
  202. ^ a b "Chaos Effect". JPToys.com. Archived from the original on June 26, 2015. Retrieved June 25, 2015.
  203. ^ "Interview With Tim Bradley". JPToys.com. March 1, 2008. Archived from the original on June 26, 2015. Retrieved June 25, 2015.
  204. ^ "Michael Giacchino to Return for 'Jurassic World: Dominion'". Film Music Reporter. March 11, 2020. Archived from the original on September 26, 2020. Retrieved March 12, 2020.
  205. ^ Bayona, JA [@FilmBayona] (December 29, 2016). "Excited to announce that my longtime collaborator @BernatVilaplana will be the editor for the new Jurassic film" (Tweet). Retrieved December 29, 2016 – via Twitter.
  206. ^ "Mark Sanger Twitter profile". Archived from the original on January 4, 2017. Retrieved August 6, 2020.
  207. ^ DiscussingFilm [@DiscussingFilm] (July 3, 2019). "Production Designer Kevin Jenkins ('Guardians of the Galaxy', 'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker' has joined the crew for 'JURASSIC WORLD 3'. (EXCLUSIVE)" (Tweet). Retrieved September 26, 2019 – via Twitter.
  208. ^ "Film Releases". Variety. Archived from the original on December 23, 2017. Retrieved February 22, 2018.
  209. ^ Grosses for first film
  210. ^ a b "The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on May 9, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  211. ^ a b "Jurassic Park III (2001)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on May 9, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  212. ^ a b "Jurassic World (2015)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on March 8, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  213. ^ a b "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on August 21, 2020. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  214. ^ a b "Jurassic World Dominion". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved July 7, 2022.
  215. ^ "Jurassic Park (1993)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on September 16, 2020. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  216. ^ "CinemaScore". CinemaScore. Archived from the original on April 13, 2022. Retrieved June 11, 2022.
  217. ^ "Jurassic Park (1993)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on November 29, 2018. Retrieved June 10, 2022.
  218. ^ "Jurassic Park Reviews". Metacritic. Archived from the original on October 13, 2018. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  219. ^ "The Lost World - Jurassic Park (1997)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on September 5, 2018. Retrieved June 10, 2022.
  220. ^ "The Lost World: Jurassic Park Reviews". Metacritic. Archived from the original on October 10, 2018. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  221. ^ "Jurassic Park III (2001)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on October 3, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2021.
  222. ^ "Jurassic Park III Reviews". Metacritic. Archived from the original on October 13, 2018. Retrieved June 10, 2022.
  223. ^ "Jurassic World (2015)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on June 22, 2018. Retrieved June 10, 2022.
  224. ^ "Jurassic World Reviews". Metacritic. Archived from the original on October 10, 2018. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  225. ^ "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on July 7, 2018. Retrieved June 10, 2022.
  226. ^ "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Reviews". Metacritic. Archived from the original on October 13, 2018. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  227. ^ "Jurassic World Dominion (2022)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on June 16, 2022. Retrieved July 8, 2022.
  228. ^ "Jurassic World Dominion Reviews". Metacritic. Archived from the original on June 15, 2022. Retrieved June 14, 2022.
  229. ^ a b Horovitz, Bruce (June 1, 1993). "'Jurassic Park' Faces Tough Obstacles to Beat 'Batman' in Retail Sales". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  230. ^ Span, Paula (June 11, 1993). "A Fit of Pre-Hysteria". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on September 19, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  231. ^ "Coming To A Toy Store Near You". Newsweek. June 13, 1993. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  232. ^ Galbraith, Jane (October 11, 1992). "A look inside Hollywood and the movies". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  233. ^ Ramirez, Anthony (May 22, 1994). "Gold In Bedrock?". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 24, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  234. ^ Strauss, Robert (February 11, 1997). "Universal Plans a Mammoth 'Lost World' Marketing Blitz". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on July 18, 2017. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  235. ^ Bellotto, Adam (May 30, 2014). "'Jurassic World' Details Remind Us of the Worst Toy Line in 'Jurassic Park' History". Film School Rejects. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  236. ^ Nolan, Caroline (July 11, 2015). "10 Toys That Are Making a Comeback". TheStreet. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  237. ^ Roberts, Tyler (July 5, 2020). "Toy Takeover: Jurassic Park: Chaos Effect Card Back Dinos by Kenner". Bleeding Cool. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  238. ^ Roberts, Tyler (July 19, 2020). "Jurassic Park Chaos Effect: The Omega T-Rex and the Big Box Dinos". Bleeding Cool. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  239. ^ Roberts, Tyler (August 2, 2020). "Jurassic Park: Chaos Effect - The Legendary Unreleased Ultimasaurus". Bleeding Cool. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  240. ^ Lipkowitz, Daniel (2001). "Hasbro: Jurassic Park III". Altered States Magazine. Archived from the original on February 22, 2001.
  241. ^ a b Keier, Helen (February 15, 2001). "Toy Fair Day 3 – Part 2: Jurassic Park 3, Lord of the Rings, Star Wars & More!". IGN. Archived from the original on February 18, 2001.
  242. ^ "Dinosaurs even the smallest kids will love". ToyNerd.com. June 18, 2013. Archived from the original on November 17, 2015. Retrieved November 13, 2015.
  243. ^ Lipkowitz, Daniel (2001). "LEGO: Jurassic Park III, Mindstorms". Altered States Magazine. Archived from the original on February 22, 2001.
  244. ^ "The LEGO Company and Universal Studios Consumer Products Group Announce New Toys Based on Jurassic Park III". The Free Library. February 5, 2001. Archived from the original on November 17, 2015.
  245. ^ Kell, John (June 13, 2015). "'Jurassic World' to bring an early Christmas to the toy industry". Fortune. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  246. ^ "'Jurassic World' film merchandise lifts Hasbro earnings". Financial Times. July 20, 2015. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  247. ^ Polo, Susana (June 25, 2015). "You think all the animals in Jurassic World are female, but Hasbro's toyline ... found a way". Polygon. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  248. ^ Quirk, Mary Beth (June 26, 2015). "Dinosaur Experts In Uproar After Hasbro Referred To 'Jurassic World' Raptor Toys As Male". Consumerist. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  249. ^ Rife, Katie (June 29, 2015). "Hasbro changes its Jurassic World toys from boys to (clever) girls". The A.V. Club. Archived from the original on August 11, 2017. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  250. ^ Lieberman, David (July 19, 2016). "Universal Swings 'Jurassic World' Toy Line To Mattel From Hasbro". Deadline. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  251. ^ "Hasbro loses license for 'Jurassic World' toys to Mattel". Reuters. July 19, 2016. Archived from the original on June 24, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  252. ^ Kell, John (July 19, 2016). "Why Mattel's Nabbing of Jurassic World Toy License Is a Big Coup". Fortune. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  253. ^ Romano, Nick (February 16, 2018). "Jurassic World toys bring the Fallen Kingdom back to life". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on June 24, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  254. ^ Konrad, Jeremy (April 26, 2018). "Let's Take a Look at Some Jurassic World Figures! Part 1: Humans". Bleeding Cool. Archived from the original on September 18, 2018. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  255. ^ a b Konrad, Jeremy (April 29, 2018). "Let's Take a Look at Some Jurassic World Figures! Part 2: Dinos!". Bleeding Cool. Archived from the original on September 19, 2018. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  256. ^ Squires, John (January 15, 2018). "Mattel Bringing 'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom' Characters into Barbie Line". Bloody Disgusting. Archived from the original on January 20, 2018. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  257. ^ Robertson, Andy (February 18, 2018). "Mattel's Jurassic World Toys Are Huge, To Scale And App-Integrated". Forbes. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  258. ^ Alter, Ethan (January 30, 2018). "Lego sets offer a peek inside 'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom' (exclusive)". Yahoo. Archived from the original on February 3, 2018. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  259. ^ Squires, John (April 18, 2018). "Funko Shows Off Full Line of 'Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom' POP! Vinyl Toys". Bloody Disgusting. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  260. ^ Squires, John (March 27, 2018). "First Look at 'Jurassic World Legacy Collection' Toys, Including Classic Characters". Bloody Disgusting. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  261. ^ Liszewski, Andrew (June 17, 2019). "You'll Spare No Expense for This Comic-Con Exclusive Jurassic Park John Hammond Figure". Gizmodo. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  262. ^ Squires, John (July 19, 2019). "Mattel's 'Amber Collection' of 6-inch 'Jurassic Park' and 'Jurassic World' Toys Revealed at #SDCC". Bloody Disgusting. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  263. ^ Stone, Loryn (August 8, 2019). "Important Toy News: Jurassic Park takes the gold in the most uncomfortable way". Syfy Wire. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  264. ^ Anderton, Ethan (June 5, 2020). "Cool Stuff: Mattel's 'Jurassic Park' Amber Collection Adds Dennis Nedry and a Dilophosaurus". /Film. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  265. ^ Roberts, Tyler (June 5, 2020). "Jurassic Park Amber Collection Adds Dennis Nedry and Dilophosaurus". Bleeding Cool. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  266. ^ Anderton, Ethan (June 3, 2021). "Cool Stuff: 'Jurassic Park' Amber Collection Adds Add John Hammond and Ellie Sattler Action Figures". /Film. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  267. ^ Sands, Rich (February 21, 2020). "Netflix's Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous rampages into Toy Fair with first look at dinos". Syfy Wire. Archived from the original on September 18, 2020. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  268. ^ Mat Elfring (August 19, 2020). "Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous Toys Are A Lot Like The Ones From The '90s". GameSpot. Archived from the original on August 23, 2020.
  269. ^ "Mattel, Target Launch 'Jurassic World' Fan Page". License Global. February 18, 2021. Archived from the original on June 14, 2021. Retrieved June 14, 2021.
  270. ^ Parker, Ryan (August 9, 2021). "'Jurassic Park' Star Sam Neill Both Alarmed and Flattered by New Alan Grant Figure". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved April 17, 2022.
  271. ^ "It's a Dino-riffic Week in Toy News". Gizmodo Australia. March 19, 2022. Retrieved April 17, 2022.
  272. ^ Thijs, Kristof (2018). Jurassic Park Collectibles. Amberley Publishing Limited. ISBN 978-1-4456-7924-2. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  273. ^ Hayes, Britt (May 16, 2012). "The 10 Worst Board Games Based on Movies". ScreenCrush. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  274. ^ "Jurassic Park Game". BoardGameGeek. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  275. ^ "The Lost World Jurassic Park Game". BoardGameGeek. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  276. ^ "Jurassic Park III: Island Survival Game". BoardGameGeek. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  277. ^ "Jurassic Park III: The Spinosaurus Chase Game". BoardGameGeek. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  278. ^ Fekete, Bob (May 21, 2018). "'Jurassic Park: Danger!' Review: Dino-Sized Fun, With Balance Issues". Newsweek. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  279. ^ Burwick, Kevin (July 12, 2018). "New Jurassic Park Board Game Unveiled by Mondo". MovieWeb. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  280. ^ Wade, Jessie (July 12, 2018). "Jurassic Park Board Game Announced". IGN. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  281. ^ Sciretta, Peter (July 12, 2018). "Mondo Jurassic Park Board Game Images And Details Revealed (And Why I'm Hesitant About This Game)". /Film. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  282. ^ Knox, Kelly (July 19, 2019). "Mondo Games' Unmatched Enters Jurassic Park". Nerdist. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  283. ^ Pearson, Ben (July 20, 2019). "'Jurassic Park' Characters Coming To Mondo's 'Unmatched' Tabletop Game". /Film. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  284. ^ Scott, Ryan (March 18, 2020). "It's InGen Vs. Raptors in Mondo's New Unmatched: Jurassic Park Game". MovieWeb. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  285. ^ Fallon, Sean (April 19, 2021). "Jurassic Park Monopoly Features An Electronic Gate That Roars and Plays Music". ComicBook.com. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  286. ^ Squires, John (April 20, 2021). "'Jurassic Park' Edition of Monopoly Being Released Next Month With Electronic Gate and Movie Character Tokens". Bloody Disgusting. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  287. ^ Ratcliffe, Amy (March 22, 2022). "Funko Games' Jurassic World Legacy Game Roars onto Kickstarter". Nerdist. Retrieved April 17, 2022.
  288. ^ Theel, Charles (October 31, 2022). "Jurassic World's immersive new board game splices in the best parts of the movie's DNA". Polygon. Retrieved November 12, 2022.
  289. ^ "Jurassic Park Comic Books". GamePro. July 1993. p. 39. Retrieved October 19, 2016.
  290. ^ Johnston, Rich (July 22, 2016). "Jurassic World comes to comics". Bleeding Cool. Archived from the original on July 28, 2016. Retrieved August 2, 2016.
  291. ^ Esposito, Joey; Schedeen, Jesse; Perez, Miguel (January 18, 2011). "Weekly Buyer's Guide - 1/18/11". IGN. Archived from the original on December 3, 2018. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  292. ^ Norris, Erik (February 3, 2011). "Jurassic Park: The Devils in the Desert #2 Review". IGN. Archived from the original on December 3, 2018. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  293. ^ Norris, Erik (March 10, 2011). "Jurassic Park: Devils in the Desert #3 Review". IGN. Archived from the original on December 3, 2018. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  294. ^ Norris, Erik (April 7, 2011). "Jurassic Park: Devils in the Desert #4 Review". IGN. Archived from the original on December 3, 2018. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  295. ^ Liu, Narayan (December 2, 2019). "Jurassic World Motion Comic Fills in the Story Between Films". CBR. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  296. ^ Erdmann, Kevin (December 5, 2019). "New Jurassic World Movie Gets a Prequel Comic Series". ScreenRant. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  297. ^ Scott, Ryan (December 5, 2019). "Jurassic World 3 Motion Comic Brings Chaos at a Surf Competition". MovieWeb. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  298. ^ Kollar, Phil (June 8, 2010). "Telltale Creating Episodic Jurassic Park Game". GameInformer.com. Archived from the original on June 10, 2010. Retrieved June 8, 2010.
  299. ^ O'Brien, Lucy (March 29, 2018). "Jurassic World Evolution Gets Official Digital, Physical Release Date: Life finds a way on June 12 and July 3". IGN. Archived from the original on April 11, 2018. Retrieved April 19, 2018.
  300. ^ Jackson, Lara (November 9, 2021). "Jurassic World Evolution 2 Praised By Jurassic World 3 Director". ScreenRant. Retrieved November 19, 2021.
  301. ^ Hillery, Eric (December 24, 2020). "Life Continues To Find A Way In VR's Jurassic World: Aftermath". Bleeding Cool. Retrieved November 29, 2022.
  302. ^ Levine, Arthur (September 29, 2020). "Universal Orlando announces new rapturous Jurassic World roller coaster". USA Today. Archived from the original on December 23, 2020. Retrieved February 18, 2021.
  303. ^ "Dino Doings". USA Today. June 7, 1993. Archived from the original on June 4, 2019. Retrieved February 18, 2020 – via NewsLibrary.
  304. ^ "Plenty of Rex Appeal at 'Jurassic Park' Exhibit". The Star-Ledger. June 23, 1993. Archived from the original on June 4, 2019. Retrieved February 18, 2020 – via NewsLibrary.
  305. ^ Costello, Jane (May 21, 2001). "The Decline of the Dinamation Dinos --- Entrepreneur's Lifelike Robots Were Nationwide Sensation Till Spielberg Spoiled Party". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on August 2, 2020. Retrieved May 8, 2020. In 1992, Jim Kirkland, then a Dinamation employee, discovered the bones of a real dinosaur that he christened Utahraptor ostrommaysi -- ostrom for Yale University scientist John Ostrom and maysi for his boss. "I just threw 'Mays' on there; it was a last minute thing", Dr. Kirkland says. He had intended to name the creature after Steven Spielberg, but at the time the discovery was verified, Universal Studios was threatening legal action against museums that used the word "Jurassic" in the title of their exhibits. Dinamation did not want the Utahraptor to bear the name of a man who was involved with a company that was suing its clients.
  306. ^ Gardiner, Beth (May 26, 1997). "A Museum's 'Lost World'". The Washington Post. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  307. ^ "Cleveland to Get 'Jurassic' Exhibit". The Plain Dealer. May 14, 1997. Archived from the original on June 4, 2019. Retrieved February 18, 2020 – via NewsLibrary.
  308. ^ "Monster Show The Museum of Natural History Opens a New Dinosaur Exhibit". The Record. May 24, 1997. Archived from the original on June 4, 2019. Retrieved February 18, 2020 – via NewsLibrary.
  309. ^ "Paleontologists May Roar Over Dinosaur Exhibit". Times Union. May 24, 1997. Archived from the original on June 4, 2019. Retrieved February 18, 2020 – via NewsLibrary.
  310. ^ a b "Culture Creature Really 'Digs' COSI's Dinosaur Exhibit". The Columbus Dispatch. March 4, 1998. Archived from the original on June 4, 2019. Retrieved February 18, 2020 – via NewsLibrary.
  311. ^ a b "Bite Me". Cincinnati. July 2001. p. 27. Archived from the original on September 19, 2021. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  312. ^ Kraft, Randy (September 27, 1998). "'Jurrasic Park' Exhibit Gives Life to Prehistoric Characters". The Morning Call. Archived from the original on February 18, 2020. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  313. ^ Roylance, Frank D. (October 1, 1998). "Dinosuar [sic] Invasion! Science Center takes us on a Jurassic lark". The Baltimore Sun. Archived from the original on February 18, 2020. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  314. ^ "Not so 'Lost' Spielberg film dinosaurs coming to county zoo". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. June 1, 1999. Archived from the original on June 4, 2019. Retrieved February 18, 2020 – via NewsLibrary.
  315. ^ Bechard, Harold (January 27, 2002). "Jurassic Hays". The Salina Journal. Archived from the original on February 18, 2020. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  316. ^ Bechard, Harold (January 27, 2002). "Jurassic Hays (page 2)". The Salina Journal. Archived from the original on February 18, 2020. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  317. ^ Kernicky, Kathleen (October 19, 2002). "Dinosaurs Invade Metrozoo". South Florida Sun-Sentinel. Archived from the original on February 18, 2020. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  318. ^ "Universal Launches Jurassic Park Institute". The Journal. December 1, 2001. Archived from the original on August 3, 2020. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  319. ^ ""Jurassic Park Institute" is a dino-mite resource". eSchool News. January 1, 2002. Archived from the original on August 2, 2020. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  320. ^ "Educational dinotainment for youths". The Washington Times. June 9, 2002. Archived from the original on August 3, 2020. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  321. ^ Schmidt, Joe (August 2008). "Business Snapshot: Advanced Animations". Vermont Business Magazine. Archived from the original on September 21, 2008.
  322. ^ "Japanese Corporate Entertainer Seeks Investors for 'Jurassic Park' Exhibit". Knight-Ridder/Tribune Business News. April 16, 2003. Archived from the original on June 4, 2019. Retrieved February 19, 2020 – via NewsLibrary.
  323. ^ Tanabe, Asako (November 20, 2003). "This Japanese Investment Gives New Meaning to 'Glamour' Stock". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on August 3, 2020. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  324. ^ Let's Go Japan 1st Ed. Macmillan. 2003. p. 160. ISBN 978-0-312-32007-2. Archived from the original on September 19, 2021. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  325. ^ Zwiezen, Zack (June 19, 2018). "The Best, Worst, And Weirdest Jurassic Park Games". Kotaku. Archived from the original on November 25, 2019. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  326. ^ Verrier, Richard (April 12, 2006). "Playing With New Themes". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on August 4, 2020. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  327. ^ "Past Thea Award recipients: 1994-2020". Themed Entertainment Association. Archived from the original on January 6, 2020. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  328. ^ "Jurassic World: Melburnians walk with dinosaurs for world premiere exhibit". ABC Online. March 18, 2016. Archived from the original on October 2, 2020. Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  329. ^ Fehily, Toby (March 22, 2016). "Jurassic World at Melbourne Museum tramples line between science and fiction". The Guardian. Archived from the original on February 22, 2020. Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  330. ^ Brundrette, Charlotte (September 29, 2016). "Jurassic World: The Exhibition closes at Melbourne Museum on Sunday". News.com.au. Archived from the original on February 22, 2020. Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  331. ^ Johnson, Steve (March 23, 2017). "Blockbuster 'Jurassic World' exhibition will bring dinosaur park to Field Museum". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on November 11, 2020. Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  332. ^ Johnson, Steve (May 24, 2017). "'Jurassic World' at Field an awesome mix of pop culture, science". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on November 11, 2020. Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  333. ^ Nunzio, Miriam Di (March 24, 2017). "Field Museum to host massive 'Jurassic World' exhibition". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on February 22, 2020. Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  334. ^ Romain, Lindsey (June 16, 2017). "The Field Museum's Jurassic World Exhibit Is Dinosaur Heaven for Kids". Chicago. Archived from the original on February 22, 2020. Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  335. ^ Jackson, Matthew (April 13, 2021). "Jurassic World: The Exhibition roars to life stateside with announcement of North American tour". Syfy Wire. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  336. ^ Caplan, Anna (June 17, 2021). "North Texas is the first stop on a new Jurassic World exhibition's U.S. tour". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  337. ^ Leishman, Rachel (June 26, 2021). "'Jurassic World: The Exhibition' Images and Video Reveal 'Living' Dinosaurs and an Adventure for the Entire Family". Collider. Retrieved October 8, 2021.

External links[edit]