Justin Turner

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Justin Turner
Justin Turner.jpg
Los Angeles Dodgers – No. 10
Third baseman
Born: (1984-11-23) November 23, 1984 (age 34)
Long Beach, California
Bats: Right Throws: Right
MLB debut
September 9, 2009, for the Baltimore Orioles
MLB statistics
(through 2018 season)
Batting average.292
Home runs93
Runs batted in405
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Justin Matthew Turner (born November 23, 1984) is an American professional baseball third baseman for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He has previously played for the Baltimore Orioles and New York Mets. Turner also has experience playing second base, shortstop and first base.[1]

Early life[edit]

Justin Turner was born in Long Beach, California, to John and Betsy Turner. He has one younger sister.[2]

Turner attended Mayfair High School in Lakewood, California, earning three-time All-Suburban first team honors as a shortstop and second baseman. He hit .514 in league play as a senior, earning most valuable player honors en route to a league title. He attended California State University, Fullerton, where he majored in kinesiology and played college baseball for the Titans. He earned freshman All-American honors from Baseball America in 2003 after quickly taking over as the starting second baseman. He was named to the 2003 College World Series all-tournament team as a shortstop. Many CWS fans that year remember him as the player who was hit in the face by a fastball after going 3 for 3 including a HR.[2] The next year, Cal State Fullerton won a two-game final over Texas in the 2004 College World Series.[2]

Turner was selected in the 29th round of the 2005 Major League Baseball Draft by the New York Yankees, but he did not sign. He was selected in the seventh round (204th overall) of the 2006 Major League Baseball Draft by the Cincinnati Reds, receiving a $50,000 bonus upon signing with the organization.[1][3]

Professional career[edit]

Cincinnati Reds[edit]

Turner reported to the Reds' Rookie League affiliate, the Billings Mustangs, where he saw time at all four infield positions and in the outfield, finishing the season with a team-leading .338 batting average and a .921 OPS.[4] He was promoted to Double-A Chattanooga within two years, finishing the 2008 season, at age 23, with a .289 average and a .792 OPS at that level.[4]

Baltimore Orioles[edit]

2009-10[edit]

On December 9, 2008, during the Winter Meetings, Turner was traded along with utility player Ryan Freel and infielder Brandon Waring to the Baltimore Orioles, in return for catcher Ramón Hernández.[5] He was invited to spring training as a non-roster invitee; upon its conclusion, he was assigned to Triple-A Norfolk for the 2009 season. Playing mostly second and third base, he finished the year with a .300 average and a .749 OPS.[4]

The Orioles purchased Turner's contract on September 8, 2009.[3] He made his major league debut that day at Fenway Park, pinch hitting for Melvin Mora and finishing the game at third base.[6] Three days later, he got his first major league hit at Yankee Stadium, a single to center field off Michael Dunn.[7] He finished the season 3-18, having appeared in 12 games, three of them starts (all at third base).[8]

Turner was invited to spring training as a member of the 40-man roster, but was demoted to Norfolk at the end of camp. However, on April 12, 2010, the Orioles placed starting second baseman Brian Roberts on the 15-day disabled list and recalled Turner from Norfolk.[9] On May 21, 2010, Turner was designated for assignment by the Baltimore Orioles.[3] In 17 games with the Orioles, he hit .111 (3 hits in 27 at-bats).[8]

New York Mets[edit]

2010-2013[edit]

Justin Turner batting for the 2011 New York Mets

On May 25, 2010, Turner was claimed off waivers from the Orioles by the New York Mets and optioned to Triple-A Buffalo. On June 16, Turner was called up to the Mets, with Nick Evans being sent down to Buffalo.[10]

After designating Brad Emaus for assignment on April 19, 2011, the Mets called Turner back up.[11] He hit his first major league home run against the Houston Astros on May 15, 2011, off Aneury Rodriguez. A three-run home run, it capped off a 5-RBI day for Turner.[12] On May 21, in a Subway Series game at Yankee Stadium, Turner collected an RBI in his 7th consecutive game, setting a Mets rookie record for most consecutive games with an RBI.[13] With this record and other impressive stats, Turner was named the NL Rookie of the Month for May 2011.[14] He was the first Met to win the award since its creation in 2001.[14]

In 2012, the Mets converted him to an all-around utility infielder but on May 6, 2012, when shortstop Ruben Tejada went on the disabled list Turner began platooning at shortstop with Jordany Valdespin until Tejada returned.

After the 2013 season, Turner was non-tendered by the Mets, making him a free agent.[15] In 301 games with the Mets over four seasons, he hit .265.[8]

Los Angeles Dodgers[edit]

Turner with the 2015 Los Angeles Dodgers

Following his release from the Mets, Turner had not yet found a new employer when Los Angeles Dodgers bench coach Tim Wallach saw Turner hitting at a Cal State Fullerton Alumni game.[16] Turner signed a minor league contract with the Dodgers on February 5, 2014,[3] with an invitation to spring training. His contract was purchased by the Dodgers on March 16 and he was added to the Major League roster.[17]

2014[edit]

Turner had a breakout season in 2014, playing 109 games due to his versatility and injuries to both Hanley Ramírez and Juan Uribe. Turner led the team with a .340 batting average, hitting 7 home runs with 43 RBI in 288 at bats.[8] On January 16, 2015, he signed a one-year, $2.5 million contract with the Dodgers, avoiding salary arbitration.[3][18] He became the starting third baseman for much of the 2015 season and hit .294 with a career high 16 homers and 60 RBI.[8]

2015[edit]

In the 2015 National League Division Series against his former team the Mets, Turner led the Dodgers with 10 hits in 19 ABs for a .526 average, with an LDS record 6 of those hits being doubles.[19] After the Dodgers were eliminated from the post-season, he underwent arthroscopic surgery on his left knee.[20] He signed a new one year, $5.1 million, contract with the Dodgers in order to avoid salary arbitration in January 2016.[21]

2016[edit]

In 2016, Turner played in a career-high 151 games, and also had career highs in home runs (27) and RBI (90), while batting .275.[8] He had six hits (including a home run) in 15 at-bats in the 2016 National League Division Series, but struggled in the 2016 National League Championship Series, hitting only .200.[8]

2017[edit]

On December 23, 2016, the Dodgers signed Turner to a four-year contract valued at $64 million.[22] Turner started the 2017 season batting .379 before going on the disabled list with a strained right hamstring, which kept him out of action from May 18 through June 9.[23] On July 6, he won the All-Star Final Vote, earning a spot in the 2017 Major League Baseball All-Star Game with 20.8 million votes, a Final Vote record.[24] Turner finished the season with a .322 batting average, a .415 on-base percentage, 21 home runs, and 71 RBI, finishing third in the NL in batting average and second in on-base percentage.[8] In the 2017 NLDS, he had six hits in 13 at-bats (.462 average), including a home run.[8] Turner and Chris Taylor were selected as the co-MVPs of the 2017 National League Championship Series,[25] where he batted .333 with two home runs and seven RBI.[8] However, in the 2017 World Series, he had only four hits in 25 at-bats, for a .160 average as the Dodgers lost to the Houston Astros in seven games.[8] Turner broke Dusty Baker's franchise record for most RBI in a single post-season when he drove in his 14th run in Game One of the World Series.[26]

2018[edit]

Turner was hit by a pitch on his left wrist during a spring training game on March 19, 2018. He suffered a non-displaced fracture, which did not require surgery but he would have to begin the season on the disabled list.[27] He did not rejoin the Dodgers until May 15.[28] Turner also missed time following the All-Star break, but rebounded in August and September. In 202 at-bats since the All-Star break, Turner hit .356 with a 1.066 OPS, 24 doubles and 9 home runs.. Turner would finish the season with a .312 AVG, hitting 14 home runs and 52 RBIs. Turner's hot streak continued in the 2018 NLDS, where he reached in 9 of 18 plate appearances.

Personal life[edit]

Turner married longtime girlfriend Kourtney Pogue in December 2017.[29]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Justin Turner". The Baseball Cube. 2015. Archived from the original on March 18, 2015. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c "2 – Justin Turner". Cal State Fullerton Athletics. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Justin Turner". Baseball Prospectus. 2015. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  4. ^ a b c "Justin Turner Career Stats". Minor League Baseball. 2015. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  5. ^ Fordin, Spencer (December 10, 2008). "Trade starts dominoes falling for O's". MLB.com. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  6. ^ "September 8, 2009, Baltimore Orioles vs. Boston Red Sox". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  7. ^ "September 11, 2009, Baltimore Orioles vs. New York Yankees". Baseball-Reference.com.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Justin Turner". Baseball-Reference.com. 2015. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  9. ^ Melewski, Steve (April 12, 2010). "Roberts to the DL now official". Mid-Atlantic Sports Network. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  10. ^ Rubin, Adam (July 17, 2010). "Mets call up Turner; Reyes sits again". ESPN. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  11. ^ Dierkes, Tim (April 19, 2011). "Mets Designate Brad Emaus For Assignment". MLB Trade Rumors. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  12. ^ Associated Press (May 15, 2011). "METS: Justin Turner hits first career HR in win over Astros". New Haven Register. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  13. ^ "Turner Sets Mets RBI Record In 7-3 Loss To Yankees". New York Mets Report. May 22, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  14. ^ a b "Justin Turner Of The New York Mets Voted Winner Of The Gillette Presents National League Rookie Of The Month Award For May (press release)". MLB.com. June 2, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  15. ^ "Mets Non-Tender Valdespin, Hefner, Atchison, Quintanilla And Turner". CBS Radio New York. December 3, 2013. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  16. ^ "Timing is everything for late blooming Justin Turner". March 17, 2017.
  17. ^ Stephen, Eric (March 16, 2014). "Justin Turner makes team, Dodgers reassign Miguel Olivo". True Blue LA. Retrieved April 23, 2015.
  18. ^ Stephen, Eric (January 16, 2015). "Dodgers avoid arbitration with Justin Turner". True Blue LA. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  19. ^ "2015 MLB postseason stats". MLB.com. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  20. ^ Stephen, Eric (October 20, 2015). "Justin Turner to have left knee surgery on Thursday". Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  21. ^ Stephen, Eric (January 15, 2016). "Justin Turner reportedly signs 1-year, $5.1 million deal, avoids arbitration". SB Nation. Retrieved January 15, 2016.
  22. ^ Staff (December 23, 2016). "Justin Turner, Dodgers finalize $64M, 4-year contract". Associated Press. Retrieved December 23, 2016 – via USA Today.
  23. ^ Stephen, Eric (June 9, 2017). "Dodgers activate Justin Turner from DL". SB Nation. Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  24. ^ Stephen, Eric (July 6, 2017). "All-Star Game 2017: Justin Turner wins Final Vote". SB Nation. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  25. ^ Cassavell, AJ (October 19, 2017). "Turner, Taylor share NLCS MVP honors". mlb.com. Retrieved October 19, 2017.
  26. ^ Stephen, Eric (October 24, 2017). "Justin Turner continues his October to remember". SB Nation. Retrieved November 28, 2017.
  27. ^ "Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner suffers broken left wrist". ESPN. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  28. ^ Stephen, Eric (May 15, 2018). "Dodgers activate Justin Turner & Logan Forsythe from disabled list". SB Nation. Retrieved May 15, 2018.
  29. ^ Thompson, Hunter (January 10, 2018). "Which Dodgers Got Married This Off-Season?". Dodgers Nation. Retrieved March 12, 2018.

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