Justine Allain Chapman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Justine Allain Chapman
Archdeacon of Boston
ChurchChurch of England
DioceseDiocese of Lincoln
In officeSeptember 2013 to present
PredecessorNew appointment
Orders
Ordination1993 (deacon)
1994 (priest)
Personal details
Birth nameJustine Penelope Heathcote Chapman
Born (1967-06-30) 30 June 1967 (age 53)
NationalityBritish
DenominationAnglicanism
Alma mater

Justine Penelope Heathcote Allain Chapman (née Chapman; born 30 June 1967) is a British Anglican priest, academic, and former teacher. Since 2013, she has served as the Archdeacon of Boston in the Diocese of Lincoln. She was previously a religious studies teacher, a parish priest in the Diocese of Southwark, and then a member of the teaching staff of South East Institute for Theological Education (SEITE).

Early life and education[edit]

Justine Chapman was born on 30 June 1967 in Durham, England.[1] She studied at King's College London, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree and the Associateship of King's College (AKC) in 1988.[2] She remained at King's College to undertake teacher training, and she completed her Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) in 1989.[1] She then spent two years, from 1989 to 1991, as head of religious studies at South Hampstead High School, an all-girls independent school in South Hampstead, London.[1][3]

In 1991, Allain Chapman entered Lincoln Theological College, an Anglican theological college, to train for Holy Orders.[3][2] During this time she also studied theology at the University of Nottingham, and she graduated with a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) degree in 1993.[1] She later continued her studies, and graduated from King's College London with a Doctor of Theology and Ministry (DThMin) degree in 2011.[2]

Ordained ministry[edit]

Allain Chapman was ordained in the Church of England as a deacon in 1993 and as a priest in 1994.[2] From 1993 to 1996, she served her curacy at Christ Church and St Paul, Forest Hill in the Diocese of Southwark.[1][2] She served as Vicar of St Paul's Church, Clapham between 1996 and 2004.[1] She was a member of General Synod of the Church of England from 2000 to 2004, having been elected by the clergy of the Diocese of Southwark as one of their representatives.[4] In 2004, she joined the South East Institute for Theological Education (SEITE) as Director of Mission and Pastoral Studies.[1][2] She was additionally Vice-Principal of the SEITE between 2007 and 2013.[1]

In March 2013, it was announced that Allain Chapman had been appointed as the Archdeacon of Boston in the Diocese of Lincoln; this would bring the number of archdeacons in the diocese to three.[5] She was installed as archdeacon during a service at Lincoln Cathedral on 8 September 2013.[6] In 2015, she was elected a member of General Synod of the Church of England for the Diocese of Lincoln.[7]

Personal life[edit]

In 1990, the then Justine Chapman married Thomas Allain; she added her husband's surname to hers to create a double-barrelled surname (and her husband did likewise); together they have four children.[1]

Selected works[edit]

  • Allain-Chapman, Justine (2012). Resilient pastors: the role of adversity in healing and growth. London: SPCK Publishing. ISBN 978-0281063833.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "ALLAIN CHAPMAN, Ven. Dr Justine Penelope Heathcote". Who's Who 2017. Oxford University Press. November 2016. Retrieved 2 May 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Justine Penelope Heathcote Allain Chapman". Crockford's Clerical Directory (online ed.). Church House Publishing. Retrieved 2 May 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Biographies - Archdeacons". Diocese of Lincoln. Retrieved 2 May 2017.
  4. ^ "Justine Allain Chapman Archdeacon of Boston" (PDF). Diocese of Lincoln (pdf). Retrieved 2 May 2017.
  5. ^ "Appointment of the Archdeacon of Boston". Diocese of Lincoln. 22 March 2013. Retrieved 2 May 2017.
  6. ^ "New Archdeacon installed at Lincoln Cathedral". ITV News. 8 September 2013. Retrieved 2 May 2017.
  7. ^ "General synod". Diocese of Lincoln. Retrieved 25 June 2017.

External links[edit]