Juvenile Law Center

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Juvenile Law Center, founded in 1975, is the oldest non-profit, public interest law firm for children in the United States.[1]

Juvenile Law Center works nationally to shape and use the law on behalf of children in the child welfare and justice systems to promote fairness, prevent harm, ensure access to appropriate services, and create opportunities for success. Juvenile Law Center works to protect and advance children's rights in state and federal courts, legislatures, and executive agencies. Its strategies include litigation, appellate advocacy, submission of amicus curiae (friend-of-the-court) briefs, policy reform, public education, professional education and training, and strategic communications.[1]

Juvenile Law Center's advocacy has contributed to several landmark United States Supreme Court rulings benefiting court-involved youth:

Juvenile Law Center has been recognized for its efforts on behalf of children.[6] Notably, in 2008, Juvenile Law Center became one of only eight organizations in the world to receive the MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.[7]

History[edit]

Juvenile Law Center was founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1975 by four Temple University Beasley School of Law graduates: Robert Schwartz, Marsha Levick, Judith Chomsky, and Philip Margolis. Two founders remain at the organization today—Robert Schwartz as Executive Director and Marsha Levick as Deputy Director and Chief Counsel.[1]

Juvenile Law Center originally operated as a walk-in legal clinic for any youth in Philadelphia with a legal problem. It grew from that walk-in clinic to a statewide organization and has since grown to a national public interest law firm for children, filing its first brief in the United States Supreme Court in 1983.[8][9]

Recently, Juvenile Law Center played a central role in exposing the Luzerne County, Pennsylvania "kids-for-cash" scandal.[10][11]

Juvenile Law Center has expanded its reach to assist advocates and policymakers abroad who likewise aim to secure legal rights and protections for children in their own countries.[12]

Notable cases[edit]

A full list of Juvenile Law Center's litigation can be found on the legal docket on the organization's website.[13]

Finances[edit]

As a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, Juvenile Law Center depends on individuals, corporations, and foundations for financial support. 70% of Juvenile Law Center's revenue comes from foundations, 14%-16% from individuals, corporations, and United Way designated gifts, and the remainder from trainings, publications, speaking events, awards, and dividend investments. Juvenile Law Center receives no local, state, or federal money to operate, nor does it charge for time or services.[14][15]

Receipt of Philanthropic Funds[edit]

70% of Juvenile Law Center's revenue comes from foundations, 14% - 16% from individuals, corporations, and United Way designated gifts, and the remainder from trainings, publications, speaking events, cy pres awards, and dividend investments.[16]

Board of Directors[edit]

Juvenile Law Center's Board includes national leaders in the child welfare and justice fields, as well as notable professionals in other domains, including government, communications, business, media, athletics, and academia.[17]

Board leadership[edit]

  • President: Barry Zubrow
  • Vice President: Michael Ruger, Esq.
  • Secretary: Scott Barsky
  • Treasurer: Deborah R. Willig, Esq.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "About Us - Juvenile Law Center". jlc.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  2. ^ "Roper v. Simmons - Juvenile Law Center". jlc.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  3. ^ "Legal Docket - Juvenile Law Center". jlc.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  4. ^ "J.D.B. v. State of North Carolina - Juvenile Law Center". jlc.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  5. ^ "Miller v. Alabama; Jackson v. Hobbs - Juvenile Law Center". jlc.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  6. ^ "Honors - Juvenile Law Center". jlc.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  7. ^ http://www.macfound.org/site/apps/nlnet/content2.aspx?c=lkLXJ8MQKrH&b=3964259&ct=5119809&notoc=1
  8. ^ "Introducing "Pursuing Justice," Juvenile Law Center's new blog! - Juvenile Law Center". jlc.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  9. ^ "Schall v. Martin - Juvenile Law Center". jlc.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  10. ^ "Luzerne County Kids-for-Cash Scandal - Juvenile Law Center". jlc.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  11. ^ Urbina, Ian (March 27, 2009). "Despite Red Flags about Judges, a Kickback Scheme Flourished". The New York Times. 
  12. ^ http://www.ucc.ie/en/news/fullstory-114701-en.html
  13. ^ "Legal Docket - Juvenile Law Center". jlc.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  14. ^ "Nonprofit Report for Juvenile Law Center". guidestar.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  15. ^ "How We Are Funded - Juvenile Law Center". jlc.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  16. ^ "How We Are Funded". jlc.org. Juvenile Law Center. Retrieved 13 September 2012. 
  17. ^ "Board of Directors - Juvenile Law Center". jlc.org. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 

External links[edit]