KBBD

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KBBD
KBBD.png
CitySpokane, Washington
Broadcast areaSpokane, Washington
Branding103.9 BOB-FM
Slogan"80s, 90s and Whatever"
Frequency103.9 MHz
First air date1988 (as KVXO)
FormatAdult Hits
ERP39,000 watts
HAAT432 meters
ClassC1
Facility ID36488
Callsign meaningBoB (branding)
Former callsignsKXVO (1984-1985, CP)
KVXO (1985-1993)
KNJY (1993-1999)
KWHK (1999-2001)
KYWL (2001-2004)
KBDB-FM (2004-2005)
OwnerMapleton Communications
(Mapleton License of Spokane, LLC)
Sister stationsKDRK, KEYF-FM, KFIO, KGA, KJRB, KZBD
WebcastListen Live
Website1039bobfm.com

KBBD (103.9 FM, "103.9 BOB-FM") is the Spokane, Washington, adult hits music formatted radio station whose slogan is "We Play Whatever". The Mapleton Communications, LLC, station broadcasts at 103.9 MHz with an effective radiated power of 39,000 watts. BOB-FM is known in Spokane as playing the biggest variety of music with the largest playlist.

History[edit]

"BOB-FM" was originally signed on the air in 2004 by Citadel with high acceptance by the Spokane market. It quickly became a low rated station until Mapleton bought it in 2007. In the Summer 2011 Arbitron ratings survey, BOB-FM rated #1 12+.

KBBD was previously known as KYWL ("Wild 103.9"), which played hip hop and R&B and called itself "Spokane's party station".

Before Wild started in 2001, 103.9 played classic rock, and before that, modern rock (when the station was known as "Z-Rock"). Zrock was up against stiff competition of rock 94 1/2. 103.9 started out in the 80s playing and adult contemporary leaning pop format as KVXO.

During the period from approximately 1985-1988, KVXO was known as "Power 104", a Mainstream CHR of the same ilk as "Zoo FM", KZZU, its main format competitor. Notable personalities on "Power 104" included Lee St. Michaels and Rob Fisher (Leroy & the Pepper); Tracie Lee; Jeff Melton; Jim "The Bod" Larsin and Greg "The Blade" Young. Success in the ratings does not always equal revenue success, so "Power 104" went dark on December 24, 1988 as then Program Director Ed Donohue pulled the plug on the transmitter.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 47°36′04″N 117°17′56″W / 47.601°N 117.299°W / 47.601; -117.299