KBEL-FM

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For the AM radio station in Idabel, Oklahoma, United States, see KBEL (AM).
KBEL-FM
KBEL-FM logo.png
City Idabel, Oklahoma
Branding Real Country Variety
Frequency 96.7 MHz
Format Country music
ERP 25,000 watts
HAAT 91 meters (299 ft)
Class C3
Facility ID 14758
Transmitter coordinates 33°52′54″N 94°49′10″W / 33.88167°N 94.81944°W / 33.88167; -94.81944Coordinates: 33°52′54″N 94°49′10″W / 33.88167°N 94.81944°W / 33.88167; -94.81944
Callsign meaning K IdaBEL
Former callsigns KWDG (?-1990)
KBEL-FM (1990-2006)
DKBEL-FM (2006-2007)
Affiliations Fox News Radio,Fox Business Radio,Oklahoma News Network,Agrinet Radio
Owner Rod Liechti
(Brute Force Radio LLC)
Sister stations KBEL
Website Official website

KBEL-FM (96.7 FM, "Real Country Variety") is a radio station broadcasting a country music format.[1] Licensed to Idabel, Oklahoma, United States, the station is currently owned by Rod Liechti through licensee Brute Force Radio LLC and features programming from Fox, ONN, Agrinet Radio and Sooner Sports Properties.[2]

History[edit]

KBEL-FM was originally a 1,000 watt mono FM station taking to the airwaves in 1976. Then after a short time at a minimum power, the station was granted authority to increase power to 3,000. The Idabel stations were originally sister stations of radio stations in Mount Pleasant, Texas which is about 85 miles south of Idabel, Oklahoma.

The station changed its call sign on December 12, 1990, from KWDG then a rock station to KBEL-FM to program country music.[3] On June 22, 1999, then-owner Harold E. Cochran assigned the station's license, along with that of its sister station KBEL, to Box Broadcasting.[4]

The licenses of both KBEL-FM and KBEL were assigned by Box Broadcasting to the current owners, Rod Liechti's Brute Force Radio, LLC. The transaction was consummated on July 30, 2013 for no consideration.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Station Information Profile". Arbitron. Summer 2009. Retrieved July 26, 2009. 
  2. ^ "KBEL-FM Facility Record". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division. Retrieved July 26, 2009. 
  3. ^ "Call Sign History". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division. Retrieved August 1, 2009. 
  4. ^ "Application Search Details". United States Federal Communications Commission, audio division. Retrieved August 1, 2009. 

External links[edit]