KIMN

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KIMN
KIMN-FM MIX 100.3 logo.png
CityDenver, Colorado
Broadcast areaDenver metropolitan area
BrandingMix 100
SloganToday's Best Mix
Frequency100.3 MHz (also on HD Radio)
First air dateJuly 9, 1959 (as KLIR-FM)
FormatFM/HD1: Hot AC
HD2: 1980s hits
HD3: Smooth jazz
ERP98,600 watts
(100,000 watts with beam tilt)
HAAT345 meters (1129 ft)
ClassC
Facility ID59597
Transmitter coordinates39°40′19″N 105°13′16″W / 39.672°N 105.221°W / 39.672; -105.221Coordinates: 39°40′19″N 105°13′16″W / 39.672°N 105.221°W / 39.672; -105.221
Callsign meaningK InterMountain Network (formerly on AM 950)
Former callsignsKLIR-FM (1959-1984)
KMJI (1984-1989)
KXLT (1989-1992)
KMJI (1992-1995)
OwnerKroenke Sports & Entertainment
(KSE Radio Ventures, LLC)
Sister stationsKKSE, KKSE-FM, KXKL
WebcastListen Live
Websitemix100.com

KIMN (100.3 MHz, "Mix 100") is a commercial FM radio station in Denver, Colorado. The station is owned by Stan Kroenke's KSE Radio Ventures and airs a Hot AC radio format. Studios and offices are located on Colorado Boulevard in Glendale, and the transmitter site is on Mount Morrison west of Lakewood.

KIMN broadcasts in the HD Radio format with two subchannel stations: HD2 is the "Ultimate ‘80s Mix" featuring 1980s’ hits and HD3 plays Smooth Jazz.[1]

Programming[edit]

The airstaff includes the "Mix Morning Show" featuring Dom Testa, Jeremy Padgett and Kris McLaughlin. Other station DJs include Emily Makinzie, and Steve Marshall. KIMN carries the syndicated countdown show American Top 40, hosted by Ryan Seacrest.

History[edit]

KLIR-FM, KXLT and KMJI[edit]

On July 9, 1959, the station signed on as KLIR-FM.[2] It was the FM counterpart to AM 990 KLIR (now KRKS). It was owned by George Basil Anderson and had an effective radiated power (ERP) of 8,800 watts, a fraction of its current power. KLIR-FM originally simulcast the AM station but later began airing a beautiful music/MOR format.

On June 7, 1984, the station switched to an Adult Contemporary format as KMJI ("Majic 100"), but would later tweak its direction to Soft AC and change its calls to KXLT ("K-Lite 100"). In November 1991, the station returned to the "Majic 100" moniker, and in 1992, the call letters switched back to KMJI.[3] The format evolved to all-'70s hits in June 1994.[4]

KIM 100/Mix 100[edit]

The KIMN call letters were picked up on April 18, 1995, along with the name "KIM 100."[5][6] From the late 1950s to the early ‘80s, KIMN had been a popular Top 40 station on AM 950, so most Denver radio listeners had grown up knowing the call sign.

On March 3, 1997, KIMN returned to AC, while still calling itself "KIM 100."[7] Chancellor Media (a forerunner of today's iHeartMedia), acquired KIMN in September 1999. Also in 1999, the station evolved into a Hot AC format and adopted the "Mix 100" moniker. For the next several years, weekend programming on KIMN featured music entirely from the 1980s. Infinity Broadcasting, a division of CBS Radio, acquired KIMN in August 2000.

In June 2008, KIMN became the Denver affiliate for the syndicated weekday show "On-Air with Ryan Seacrest." The station discontinued the show in February 2009. In March 2009, CBS Radio sold KIMN, along with sister stations KWOF and KXKL-FM, to Wilks Broadcasting.[8]

Move to Top 40[edit]

In the summer of 2014, KIMN updated its moniker to "Mix 100.3", changed its positioning statement from "Denver's Best Music Mix" to "All The Hits", and shifted towards Top 40 (CHR). Despite the format adjustment, KIMN continues to report to both Mediabase and Billboard/BDS's Adult Top 40 charts.

The shift also put the station more in competition with Adult Top 40 rival KALC, owned by Entercom, and iHeartMedia's Top 40/CHR KPTT. In 2016, the station returned to its previous moniker "Mix 100" and a new positioning statement, "Today's Best Mix."

KSE Purchase[edit]

On October 12, 2015, Kroenke Sports Enterprises (KSE), owned by Altitude Sports and Entertainment founder Stan Kroenke, announced it would acquire Wilks Broadcasting's Denver properties: KIMN, Country KWOF, and Classic Hits KXKL-FM. Once the sale was approved by the FCC, KSE was expected to flip one of the three outlets to all-sports. The new FM sports station would likely claim the broadcasting rights to the Denver Nuggets, Colorado Avalanche, and Colorado Rapids from rival FM sports station KKFN, owned by Bonneville International.[9]

The transaction was consummated on December 31, 2015, at a purchase price of $54 million. However, KIMN retained their Adult Top 40 as KWOF made the flip to Sports on September 17, 2018.

KIMN callsign[edit]

The call sign KIMN originally belonged to a Denver AM station located at 950 kHz. From the late 1950s to the early 1980s, KIMN was the dominant Top 40 music station in Denver. The station also highlighted the popular local rock n' roll bands of that era, such as the Astronauts, Daniels, Fogcutters, Moonrakers, Soul Survivors,and others.[10] The station had other nicknames as the Denver Tiger, Boss Radio, and 95 Fabulous KIMN.[11] The station was then owned and operated by Kenneth E. Palmer (1925-1984).[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-11-29. Retrieved 2014-11-14.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ [https://www.americanradiohistory.com/Archive-BC-YB/1960/B%201%20Radio%20Yearbook%201960.pdf Broadcasting Yearbook 1960 page
  3. ^ http://www.americanradiohistory.com/Archive-Billboard/90s/1991/BB-1991-11-16.pdf
  4. ^ http://www.americanradiohistory.com/Archive-RandR/1990s/1994/RR-1994-04-29.pdf
  5. ^ Stark, Phyllis (April 29, 1995). "Vox Jox". Billboard. 107 (17): 92.
  6. ^ http://www.americanradiohistory.com/Archive-RandR/1990s/1995/RR-1995-04-21.pdf
  7. ^ http://www.americanradiohistory.com/Archive-RandR/1990s/1997/RR-1997-03-07.pdf
  8. ^ Broadcasting & Cable Yearbook 2010 page D-116
  9. ^ "Kroenke Sports Acquires Wilks' Denver Stations" from Radio Insight (October 12, 2015)
  10. ^ Bob Groke Denver Bands
  11. ^ The KIMN Tribute Site
  12. ^ KIMN Tribute Photos and History Page

External links[edit]