KKBox

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KKBOX
KKBOX logo.svg
Type of businessPrivate
FoundedOctober 2004; 15 years ago (2004-10)
Headquarters
Country of origin Republic of China (Taiwan)
Founder(s)Chris Lin, et al
CEOChris Lin
IndustryMusic
ServicesMusic streaming
ParentKDDI
(76% common stock)
URLwww.kkbox.com
Users10 million+
Launched2005
Current statusActive
Native client(s) onAndroid, iOS, Windows, macOS, etc

KKBox, stylized as KKBOX, is a music streaming service developed in 2005 by KKBOX Inc., a software company in Taipei, Taiwan. It is a part of Japanese Telecom Group, KDDI. The service mainly targets the music markets of East and Southeast Asia, focusing on regions including: Taiwan, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Japan and Singapore. Working on a freemium basis, both paid and free members can listen to over 20 million tunes on smartphones, TVs, media centers and computers.[1]

As a Taiwan-based music streaming software, KKBOX caters mainly to Mandarin-speaking users by collaborating with record companies in the Taiwanese music industry. KKBOX also has close links with Taiwanese artists, and mainstream Mandopop artists like Jay Chou, Eric Chou and Bii.

Development[edit]

After launching KKBOX in Taiwan, the company expanded the music streaming service to Hong Kong and Macau in 2009, Japan in 2011, Malaysia, and Singapore in 2013.[2] Starting from 2011, KKBOX received investment from KDDI Corporation,[3] a Japanese telecom who occupied 76% of the stocks; HTC Corporation, a smartphone company, and; GIC, a Singaporean fund.

KKBOX has operated on Windows, Windows Media Center, Mac OS X, iOS, Android, Symbian, Bada, partly Java,[4] and since 2015 Apple Watch.[5]

In 2006, the first KKBOX Music Awards ceremony was held in Taiwan. Various artists that have performed and been honored including Eason Chan, Jay Chou, Jolin Tsai, Apink, Sekai No Owari.[6] In January 2017, KKBOX announced the winners of its 12th Annual KKBOX Music Awards.[7]

Controversy over copyright[edit]

In 2007, KKBOX was suspected of reproducing musical works and allowed its members to download them without authorization. The works included 324 songs owned by HCM Music and songwriter Chan Kien Ming. KKBOX's owner and manager were prosecuted by Taipei District Prosecutors Office.[8] In 2009, the court held that the case was considered as a civil dispute and the defendants were acquitted.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Huber, D. M., & Runstein, R. E. (2005). Modern recording techniques (8th ed.). Burlington, MA: Focal Press. p.579
  2. ^ KKBOX https://www.kkbox.com/about/en/about#intro
  3. ^ KDDI to migrate its music service to KKBOX , joining Asia’s largest music network--The Bridge http://thebridge.jp/en/2013/04/kddi-kkbox-music-service
  4. ^ Wherever you go, listen to music with mobile phones or computers--KKBOX https://www.kkbox.com/hk/en/what-is-kkbox/supported-platforms.shtml
  5. ^ "KKBOX打入Apple Watch - 產業.科技". 中時新聞網.
  6. ^ KKBOX Music Awards--KKBOX https://www.kkbox.com/about/en/musicaward
  7. ^ "Hebe, Mayday, JJ Lin among winners of Taiwan's KKBOX awards". AsiaOne. Retrieved 2017-10-16.
  8. ^ KKBOX下載音樂侵權 王永慶外孫被訴-- National Chiao Tung University "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-04-09. Retrieved 2016-03-24.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ 遭控侵權 KKBOX簡民一判無罪--Chinatimes http://news.chinatimes.com/CMoney/News/News-Page-content/0,4993,11050709+122009072200294,00.html Archived 2009-07-26 at the Wayback Machine