KQFM

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For The radio station in Portland, Oregon at 100.3 FM known as KQFM from 1954-1983, see KKRZ.
KQFM
City Hermiston, Oregon
Broadcast area Umatilla and Morrow County, Oregon
Branding The Q
Slogan Today's Hits and Yesterday's Favorites
Frequency 93.7 MHz
First air date September 18, 1978 (as KOHU-FM at 99.3)
Format Adult Contemporary
ERP 5,300 watts
HAAT 94 meters (308 ft)
Class A
Facility ID 27076
Transmitter coordinates 45°51′57″N 119°18′38″W / 45.86583°N 119.31056°W / 45.86583; -119.31056
Callsign meaning K Quality FM
Former callsigns KOHU-FM (1978-1984)
KQFM-FM (1984-1986)[1]
Former frequencies 99.3 MHz (1978-2000)
100.5 MHz (2000-2010)
100.1 MHz (2010-2016)
Affiliations Westwood One
Owner West End Radio, LLC
Sister stations KOHU
Website gohermiston.com

KQFM (93.7 FM, "The Q") is a radio station licensed to serve Hermiston, Oregon, United States. The station, established in 1978, is owned by West End Radio, LLC, which is in turn owned by the Ronald L. Hughes and Gloria Hughes Living Trust.

Programming[edit]

KQFM broadcasts an adult contemporary music format including the satellite-delivered "Adult Contemporary (radio network)" 24-hour live format produced by Westwood One. KQFM had aired the Hits and Favorites radio network provided by ABC Radio Networks and Citadel Media, but the network ceased operations in July 2014, leaving KQFM to affiliate with Westwood One's format. KQFM 100.5 FM recently left its oldies format behind for new programming that features adult contemporary music including hits from the '70s through the '90s, plus current popular music. In addition to its usual music programming, KQFM broadcasts select high school sports events featuring teams from Hermiston High School.

History[edit]

The beginning[edit]

This station began regular operation on September 18, 1978, broadcasting with 3,000 watts of effective radiated power on a frequency of 99.3 MHz.[2] The station was assigned the call sign KOHU-FM by the Federal Communications Commission.[1] Launched as a sister station of KOHU (1360 AM), KOHU-FM broadcast a beautiful music format under the guidance of general manager and chief engineer Harmon Springer and program director Willie Kelly and the ownership of the Hermiston Broadcasting Company.[2]

The station was assigned new call sign KQFM-FM by the FCC on March 1, 1984.[1] Just over two years later, on November 25, 1986, the station changed call signs again, this time to the simpler KQFM.[1]

New ownership[edit]

In February 1997, the Hermiston Broadcasting Company reached an agreement to sell KQFM and AM sister station KOHU to the Capps Broadcast Group through their West End Radio, LLC, subsidiary.[3] The deal was approved by the FCC on April 16, 1997, and the transaction was consummated on May 1, 1997.[4]

Move to 100.5[edit]

In April 2000, KQFM applied to the FCC to change its assigned broadcast frequency from 99.3 MHz to 100.5 MHz.[5] The change was made as part of a multi-station shuffle to accommodate a power increase by KUJ-FM in Burbank, Washington.[6] The station received a new construction permit to authorize the change on August 8, 2000.[5]

In January 2003, the Capps Family, co-owners of KQFM licensee West End Radio, LLC, announced an agreement to transfer control of the company to Ronald L. Hughes and Gloria Hughes. The deal was approved by the FCC on February 14, 2003, and the transaction was consummated on June 4, 2003.[7] This move coincided with the station's flip from oldies to adult contemporary music.[8] In March 2004, Ronald L. Hughes and Gloria Hughes applied to the FCC to transfer the broadcast license for KQFM to the Ronald L. Hughes and Gloria Hughes Living Trust. The transfer was approved by the FCC on April 7, 2004, and the transaction was consummated on April 12, 2004.[9]

Move to 100.1[edit]

In April 2007, KQFM filed another application with the FCC to change its assigned broadcast frequency again, this time from 100.5 MHz to 100.1 MHz.[10] This move is part of a multi-station shuffle involving KQFM and KWRL to allow religious broadcaster KHSS in Walla Walla, Washington, to obtain a "bigger, more powerful" signal at 100.7 MHz.[11] The transmitter site would also be moved very slightly to the west and the antenna raised to 94 meters (308 ft) in height above average terrain. The station received a new construction permit to authorize the change on September 17, 2007.[10] The station began licensed operation on 100.1 MHz on February 17, 2010.

Move to 93.7[edit]

On February 4, 2016 KQFM moved from 100.1 FM to 93.7 FM, swapping frequencies with KRKG-FM Pasco, Washington, which moved from 93.7 FM to 100.1 FM. [12]

Station alumni[edit]

Harmon Springer, then the general manager of KQFM and KOHU, served as the president of the Oregon Association of Broadcasters for the 1987 calendar year.[13]

[edit]

KQFM-FM logo.png (KQFM's logo under previous 100.5 frequency)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Call Sign History". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access Database. Retrieved May 27, 2009. 
  2. ^ a b "Directory of Radio Stations in the United States and Canada". Broadcasting Yearbook 1979. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1979. p. C-181. 
  3. ^ "Business Briefs". East Oregonian. July 20, 2003. Dave Capps and Hughes purchased the Hermiston stations from Harmon Springer and Bob Chopping in 1997. 
  4. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19970226ED)". FCC Media Bureau. May 1, 1997. 
  5. ^ a b "Application Search Details (BPH-20000425ABE)". FCC Media Bureau. August 8, 2000. 
  6. ^ "MM Docket No. 97-246". FCC Allocations Branch. July 17, 1998. 
  7. ^ web Application Search Details (BTC-20030103ACD) Check |url= value (help), FCC Media Bureau, June 4, 2003 
  8. ^ "Briefcase: KQFM 100.5 FM". East Oregonian. January 19, 2003. KQFM 100.5 FM recently left its oldies format behind for new programming that features adult contemporary music including hits from the '70s through the '90s, plus current popular music. 
  9. ^ "Application Search Details (BTC-20040316AJH)". FCC Media Bureau. April 12, 2004. 
  10. ^ a b "Application Search Details (BPH-20070418AAW)". FCC Media Bureau. September 17, 2007. 
  11. ^ "KHSS News: KHSS Signal Upgrade Status". KHSS Radio. Retrieved May 26, 2009. 
  12. ^ Oregon/Washington Stations Complete Frequency Swap
  13. ^ "Past Board of Directors Presidents and Chairs: 1980s". Oregon Association of Broadcasters. Retrieved May 26, 2009. 

External links[edit]