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Kadhalikka Neramillai

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Kadhalikka Neramillai
Kadhalikka Neramillai poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by C. V. Sridhar
Produced by C. V. Sridhar
Written by C. V. Sridhar
Chitralaya Gopu
Starring T. S. Balaiah
R. Muthuraman
Nagesh
Rajasree
Sachu
Ravichandran
Kanchana
Music by Viswanathan–Ramamoorthy
Cinematography
Edited by N. M. Shankar
Production
company
Distributed by Chitralaya Pictures
Release date
  • 27 February 1964 (1964-02-27)
Running time
159 minutes[1]
Country India
Language Tamil

Kadhalikka Neramillai (English: No Time for Love) is a 1964 Indian Tamil-language romantic comedy film produced and directed by C. V. Sridhar, who also conceived and co-wrote its script with Chitralaya Gopu. The film features an ensemble cast consisting of T. S. Balaiah, R. Muthuraman, Nagesh, Rajasree, Sachu, Ravichandran and Kanchana. The latter two made their debut in Tamil cinema with this film.

The plot of Kadhalikka Neramillai revolves around Viswanathan, an estate owner who hopes to get his daughters Nirmala and Kanchana married to wealthy grooms. However, Nirmala falls in love with Ashok, a poor man who was once employed by Vishwanathan. To earn Viswanathan's approval, Ashok pretends to be the only heir of a rich businessman; he is supported by his friend Vasu, who poses as Ashok's fictional millionaire father Chidambaram. A comedy of errors ensues when Vasu discovers his lover Kanchana is Viswanathan's other daughter.

Principal photography for the film took place mostly in Ooty and in a bungalow near Pollachi. One song sequence was filmed in Marina Beach, Chennai. It was the first full-length comedy film by Sridhar, who was then known for making dramatic films. It was also the first Tamil film to be released in Eastmancolor; previous Indian colour films were made in Gevacolor and Technicolor. The cinematographers were A. Vincent and P. N. Sundaram, and the editor was N. M. Shankar. The film's soundtrack and score were composed by the duo Viswanathan–Ramamoorthy, with lyrics written by poet Kannadasan.

Kadhalikka Neramillai was released on 27 February 1964 and was applauded for its comedy; it was a commercial success, running in theatres for more than 175 days. It has also received wide appreciation from contemporary critics and film personalities. Regarded as a trend-setting comedy, the film has since developed a cult status in Tamil cinema. Its success led to a Telugu remake Preminchi Choodu (1965) and a Hindi remake Pyar Kiye Jaa (1966). The Telugu remake was directed by P. Pullaiah while the Hindi remake was directed by Sridhar. Rajasree reprised her role in both those films.

Plot[edit]

Viswanathan (T. S. Balaiah) is an arrogant, money-minded estate owner who lives in a bungalow called Chinnamalai Estate near Pollachi. His son Chellappa (Nagesh) is an aspiring filmmaker; Chellappa is the antithesis of his father and voices his displeasure at his father's arrogance. Viswanathan also has two daughters; Kanchana (Kanchana) and Nirmala (Rajasree). Kanchana is in love with her college mate Vasu (R. Muthuraman), the son of a rich Chennai-based businessman Sachidanandam (V. S. Raghavan). The sisters return home after completing their education in Chennai. One day while out sightseeing, a battered car driven by their father's young, rebellious estate manager Ashok (Ravichandran) bumps into their car. The sisters quarrel with Ashok and are annoyed by his insolence. At their home, they force Viswanathan to dismiss Ashok. Infuriated, Ashok pitches a tent overlooking their bungalow and begins a strike to get his job back. Nirmala accidentally drops a bucket of water on Ashok's head, hurting him. Feeling guilty, she visits Ashok's tent to apologise and they fall in love.

Viswanathan decides to get his daughters married to wealthy men. Ashok realises that because he is poor he has no chance of becoming a prospective groom. Nirmala loves him but she does not wish to elope with him. He calls up his friend, who happens to be Vasu, to pose as his wealthy father. Vasu arrives at Chinnamalai and agrees to help. He disguises himself as a rich, old man named Chidambaram. When Kanchana is introduced to Vasu in disguise, he is shocked because he believes Ashok loves Kanchana, but discovers to his relief that Ashok is in love with Nirmala.

Meanwhile, Chellappa starts a film production house called Oho Productions. Unable to earn anyone's faith in his capabilities, he handles the film-making himself. Chellappa unsuccessfully tries to persuade his father to finance his film; he engages the estate manager's daughter Meenalochni (Sachu) to play the heroine in his film. Chellappa selects Ashok for the film's screenplay and asks Chidambaram to fund it. When the film does not progress as expected, Meenalochni's father forces Chellappa to marry her. Chellappa initially refuses but realising he has no choice, he accepts the offer.

On a short trip, Chidambaram reveals his identity to Vishwanathan's daughters, who agree to play along. Viswanathan, believing Ashok is the only heir of a millionaire, asks Kanchana's consent to marry him. When Kanchana rejects the proposal, Viswanathan asks Nirmala, who happily accepts. Sachidanandam, who is buying a nearby estate, is referred to Viswanathan and arrives in Chinnamalai. They meet and discover that they are childhood friends. Thinking it would be inappropriate to marry off his younger daughter while the elder one is still unmarried, Viswanathan arranges Kanchana's marriage to Vasu, who meets his father is unable to reveal his true identity to prevent getting caught. When Sachidanandam returns to Chennai to make the wedding preparations, he finds that there has been no word from his son, who left for Coimbatore weeks before. Sachidanandam almost cancels the marriage when Vasu makes a telephone call in the nick of time and approves the marriage.

Sachidanandam's car breaks down and he takes shelter in a nearby hut until it is fixed. There, he finds a photograph of Ashok and an elderly school teacher who is Ashok's father. He suspects Ashok of foul play to usurp Viswanathan's riches and files a complaint. Vasu and Ashok are held in custody by the police. As Sachidanandam arrives at the police station, the truth behind the impersonation is revealed and he withdraws his complaint. When his daughters refuse to part with their lovers, Viswanathan realises their love and agrees to their request to get married.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Origin[edit]

C. V. Sridhar and Sadagopan, who was known by his screen name Chitralaya Gopu, had been friends since their tenure at St. Joseph's High School, Chengalpattu.[2] At school both were playwrights; Sridhar wrote stage plays and portrayed the lead roles.[3] Gopu wrote the humour-oriented plays and portrayed comic roles.[3] Later, when Sridhar had the opportunity to direct a film, he asked Gopu to join him and handle the humour content.[4][5] The success of Kalyana Parisu (1959) led to Sridhar establishing his own production house, Chitralaya Pictures.[2][6]

Sridhar used to spend his evenings with Gopu, driving along Marina Beach.[7] Gopu asked Sridhar whether he would like to work on a comedy film. Sridhar, who was known for dramatic films, thought the audience would not accept a comedy from him. He agreed reluctantly upon Gopu's insistence, and decided to produce a full-length comedy and originated the title, Kadhalikka Neramillai, which translates as "No time for love".[8] The entire story and screenplay were conceived on Marina Beach; according to Gopu, "[s]itting in Sridhar’s open Herald, we discussed the script for days on end".[3]

Cast and crew[edit]

P. S. Raman, who went to Chennai in 1963 to join a medical college, was asked to see Sridhar, who was auditioning newcomers for the film.[9] Raman was renamed Ravichandran and introduced in this film,[10] as the character Ashok.[11] Sivakumar had auditioned for the role before it went to Ravichandran.[12] During a flight, Sridhar met an air-hostess named Vasundhara Devi and approached her to play one of the female leads.[6][13] Because she shared her name with Vasundhara Devi, the mother of actress Vyjayanthimala, Sridhar renamed her Kanchana to avoid confusion.[14]

Rajasree, who made her film debut as a child actor in AVM Productions' Naga Devathai (1956) playing the younger version of Jamuna's character, was in her late teenage years and was playing second heroine and sister roles in Telugu films. Gopu phoned and asked her to attend their studio the next day to audition for her role.[15] A song sequence, "Anubhavam Pudhumai", was shot to audition her; the makers were impressed and her name was added to the cast, making it her first film as a lead actress.[16]

Sachu, who began her career as a child actor, played the heroine in films such as Veerathirumagan (1961) and Annai (1962) until Sridhar offered her a comic role.[17][18] Sachu initially refused the offer as she was hesitant on playing a comic role. Sridhar assured her that being a full-fledged comedy film, there were no separate comedians and that she would only be playing a character in one of the three lead pairs.[19] Gopu also persuaded Sachu's grandmother, who used to accompany her to the sets.[20][21] Impressed by the way Sridhar "narrated the story featuring three couples", Sachu accepted the offer.[22] Sachu felt that the film's story was as good as William Wyler's Roman Holiday (1953).[23] In a 2016 interview with The New Indian Express, she recalled, "I was very young and most movies were family-oriented. I couldn’t relate to them. So when [Kadhalikka Neramillai] came by, I readily agreed."[24]

T. S. Balaiah and R. Muthuraman were chosen to play the characters Viswanathan and Vasu respectively.[11] Nagesh, then a struggling actor whose breakthrough role was in Sridhar's Nenjil Or Aalayam (1962),[25] was selected to play Viswanathan's son Chellappa.[26][27] V. S. Raghavan was cast as the father of Muthuraman's character.[28] The screenplay and dialogues were co-written by Sridhar and Gopu.[1] A. Vincent and P. N. Sundaram handled the film's cinematography,[29] while N. M. Shankar was the editor.[30] Art director Ganga,[31] and choreographers Thangappan and Mugur Sundar comprised the rest of the technical crew.[32]

Filming[edit]

Aaliyar Dam, as seen from the Chinnamalai Estate bungalow where a major portion of the film was shot.

Kadhalikka Neramillai was the first Tamil film to be made in Eastmancolor.[33][34] Film critic Baradwaj Rangan believes that with this film, Sridhar became the first Tamil director to "make an all-out comedy in colour".[35] It was produced by Vijaya Vauhini Studios and processed at Gemini Studios' laboratory.[36][37] Principal photography on the film commenced with the song "Anubhavam Pudhumai", which was picturised on Ravichandran and Rajasree. Portions of the song featuring the latter were the first scenes shot. Because the producers had not taken measurements for her costumes, Rajasree was sceptical about whether filming would begin that day. She was given a nightgown as the costume for the song sequence.[15][16] Sachu's costumes were designed by Sridhar himself.[23]

Because the idea for the film came while at the Marina Beach, the opening sequence song "Enna Parvai" picturised on Muthuraman and Kanchana was filmed on the beach promenade with the University of Madras and Presidency College in the background.[5] In the first scene of the film, Sridhar attempted to depict Chennai as a "progressive place: where couples sang duets on the Marina".[38] Most of the film was shot in Ooty.[39] Filming also took place on location at the Aaliyar Guest House, a bungalow near Aaliyar Dam, Coimbatore.[8] During filming, Gopu gave Ravichandran the lyrics of the song "Naalaam Naalaam", which were written like tongue-twisters in chaste Tamil. He claimed they were his own lines and asked him to memorise them. When the director called for the shots, Ravichandran asked for more time because he found it difficult to remember the dialogue. The puzzled director then said, "This isn’t the dialogue. Who gave it to you? This is a social film, a comedy. Gopu must have done it. He’s always pulling a fast one, don’t you know?"[3] During the 50th anniversary of the film in 2014, Rajasree said she had difficulties in providing the right pronunciation of her dialogues for the film.[40]

In one scene, Viswanathan asks Chellappa to tell a story, promising to finance his film if he is impressed. Knowing he will not receive any funds, Chellappa decides to scare Viswanathan and narrates a horror story. Nagesh later said this was Gopu's idea; "You know how director Dada [Mirasi] tells a story. Just follow the pattern". Nagesh and Balaiah completed shooting the scene in a single take.[41] According to film historian Mohan V. Raman, this scene was inspired by the way in which Mirasi narrated the basic storyline of his directorial venture Puthiya Paravai (1964) to its lead actor Sivaji Ganesan's brother V. C. Shanmugham who, impressed with the narration, called Sridhar to listen to it.[42] Kanchana recalled filming the scene and said, "I was standing behind, trembling to control my laughter. The moment the scene was over, the entire team began to laugh, so hard, we soon had tears running down our faces."[8] The final length of the film was 4,355.97 metres (14,291.2 ft).[43]

Music[edit]

Kadhalikka Neramillai
Soundtrack album by
Viswanathan–Ramamoorthy
Genre Film soundtrack
Length 31:03
Language Tamil
Label Saregama

The soundtrack album and background score for Kadhalikka Neramillai were composed by Viswanathan–Ramamoorthy (a duo consisting of M. S. Viswanathan and T. K. Ramamoorthy) and the lyrics were written by Kannadasan.[3] The album was released under the label of Saregama.[44]

The song "Anubhavam Pudhumai" is loosely based on a 1940 Spanish song titled "Bésame Mucho".[45] Philips, an autodidact guitarist, played the guitar for "Anubhavam Pudhumai" and "Malarendra Mugamondru".[46] The original soundtrack edition omits the songs "Maadimele" and "Kadhalikka Neramillai", which are included on the track list of Raaga.com; the website omits the song "Viswanathan Velai Vendum" which was included on the original soundtrack edition.[47][48] Viswanathan and his wife were spending a vacation in Yercaud for a week, when Kannadasan, Gopu and Sridhar were waiting for him to begin composing the songs. The day when Viswanathan returned and arrived at Chithralaya office, Kannadasan said, "Ennappa..Viswanathaa...Velai kodu.." (English: Viswanathan give me some work). Sridhar then said that should be the beginning of the song and decided to give Balaiah's character the name Viswanathan.[49]

The music received positive reviews from critics. The song "Enna Parvai" was considered by K. J. Yesudas as his breakthrough song in his career as a playback singer.[40] Playwright-comedian Y. G. Mahendra described the songs as "immortal masterpieces".[50] Anand Venkateswaran of The Hindu wrote, "MSV's music immortalised Sridhar's images in Viswanathan, velai ventum [sic] and the bosomy Anubavam puthumai [sic]."[51] V. Chandramohan of The Hindu Tamil praised the catchy rock and roll tunes in "Maadimele" and said "Anubhavam Pudhumai" and "Enna Paarvai" were meant for all music lovers.[52] A live version of "Nenjathai Alli" was later performed by Unni Menon at an August 2012 ceremony commemorating the 14th year anniversary of Jaya TV.[53]

Original track list[47]
No. Title Singer(s) Length
1. "Unga Ponnaana Kaigal" P. B. Sreenivas 03:26
2. "Enna Paarvai" K. J. Yesudas, P. Susheela 03:21
3. "Malarendra Mugamondru" L. R. Eswari, M. S. Raju 03:20
4. "Viswanathan Velai Vendum" P. B. Sreenivas 04:43
5. "Naalaam Naalaam" P. B. Sreenivas, P. Susheela 03:21
6. "Nenjathai Alli" K. J. Yesudas, L. R. Eswari, P. Susheela 03:44
Raaga track list[48]
No. Title Singer(s) Length
1. "Enna Paarvai" K. J. Yesudas, P. Susheela 03:21
2. "Maadimele" P. B. Sreenivas 03:26
3. "Unga Ponnaana Kaigal" P. B. Sreenivas 03:26
4. "Anubhavam Pudhumai" P. B. Sreenivas, P. Susheela 05:30
5. "Naalaam Naalaam" P. B. Sreenivas, P. Susheela 03:21
6. "Malarendra Mugamondru" L. R. Eswari, M. S. Raju 03:20
7. "Kadhalikka Neramillai" Sirkazhi Govindarajan 04:55
8. "Nenjathai Alli" K. J. Yesudas, L. R. Eswari, P. Susheela 03:44
iTunes track list[54]
No. Title Singer(s) Length
1. "Anubhavam Pudhumai" P. B. Sreenivas, P. Susheela 05:31
2. "Maadimele" P. B. Sreenivas 03:27
3. "Kadhalikka Neramillai" Sirkazhi Govindarajan 05:13
4. "Unga Ponnaana Kaigal" P. B. Sreenivas 03:26
5. "Enna Paarvai" K. J. Yesudas, P. Susheela 03:21
6. "Malarendra Mugamondru" L. R. Eswari, M. S. Raju 03:28
7. "Kadhalikka Neramillai (Comedy Sequences)" Nagesh, T. S. Balaiah 20:24
8. "Anubhavam Pudhumai (Remix)" Leena Pradeep, S. Kedharnath 03:40
9. "Malarendra Mugamondru (Remix)" Sinduri 03:52
10. "Nenjathai Alli" K. J. Yesudas, L. R. Eswari, P. Susheela 03:41
11. "Naalaam Naalaam" P. B. Sreenivas, P. Susheela 03:42

Release[edit]

Gopu (pictured in 2015) and Nagesh (pictured in 2005) received major praise for their contributions.

Kadhalikka Neramillai was released on 27 February 1964.[9] Artist Jeyaraj designed the publicity posters.[55] Gopu said Chitralaya released the film because initially no company wanted to screen it; the first showings were at the Casino Theatre in Chennai and later in Madurai. A few weeks after its release, the film caught the attention of theatre distributors, who competed with one another for it.[8] Eventually, it garnered wide critical acclaim and became a commercial success,[56] running for more than 175 days in theatres and becoming a silver jubilee film.[a] On the 175th day celebrations held at N. K. T. Kala Mandapam, Triplicane, Viswanathan and Ramamoorthy were conferred with the title "Mellisai Mannargal", by Kannadasan.[49]

In April 2010, Kadhalikka Neramillai was one of five films screened at the South Indian Film Chamber Theatre for the Dignity Film Festival held in Chennai; the other four were Madhumati (1958), Server Sundaram (1964), Anbe Vaa (1966) and Thillana Mohanambal (1968).[57][58][59]

Critical response[edit]

The film was widely appreciated for the comedy sequences featuring Nagesh.[60] On 15 March 1964, the Tamil magazine Ananda Vikatan praised the filmmaker for having given an innovative comedy that did not bore audiences but entertain them.[61] On On 29 February 1964, The Indian Express noted that the lack of major stars gave the film a feeling of freshness, applauded the performances of the cast members and concluded, "One cannot carry home anything after seeing the picture. But its very purpose is just that: to ease you of all your worries."[62]

In 2006, Malathi Rangarajan of The Hindu wrote, "Even today Kadhalikka Neramillai has you in splits every time you watch it".[41] Following Sridhar's death in 2008, she wrote, " ... who can forget the humour ride Sridhar offered with Kadhalikka Naeramillai? The carnival feel and gaiety, the freshness of the cast, the hill station back drops in Eastman colour and the comedy that every actor projected so well, with Nagesh and T.S. Balaiah at the helm will live as long as Tamil cinema does!"[63] That same year, also from The Hindu, P. R. Viswanathan wrote, "Kadhalikka Neramillai saw Nagesh walking into the hearts of Tamil filmgoers".[64]

According to a February 2009 article by The Hindu, Nagesh gave Tamil cinema one of its "memorable vintage comedy scenes" as the intrepid storyteller/film director.[65] The news agency, Press Trust of India, noted that his role as aspiring director Chellappa is still remembered by Tamil filmgoers.[66] Ramya Kannan of The Hindu said, "Kadhalikka Neramillai broke out on celluloid screens in the South, in glorious Eastman Colour, with songs (by Vishwanathan-Ramamoorthy) that were an instant hit".[8] Also from The Hindu, Meera Srinivasan said, "Kadhalikka Neramillai made waves in the industry and remains one of the best-loved comedies in Tamil cinema".[2] Another journalist for The Hindu wrote, "Kaadhalikka Neramillai (1964) turned out to be a superhit, its songs memorable, and some of the scenes featuring T.S.Balaiya and Nagesh... classic comedy".[56] Film critic Naman Ramachandran called it "one of the all-time great comedies of Tamil cinema".[67] Sify wrote, "[Nagesh's] scenes with Baaliah who played his father has terrific comedy timing and great one-liners".[68] In 2008, M. Suganth of The Times of India rated the film four out of five, calling it "a humorous ride from the first reel to the last and it does so without resorting to cheap humour" and concluded, "Despite being made decades ago, the film has a charm and timelessness that are the hallmarks of any classic."[69] The Hindu's N. Kesavan wrote on Sachu's performance, "One cannot forget her role in Kadhalikka Neramillai opposite Nagesh."[70]

Remakes[edit]

In 1965, Kadhalikka Neramillai was remade in Telugu as Preminchi Choodu. The remake was directed by P. Pullaiah, and featured Akkineni Nageswara Rao and Kongara Jaggayya in the lead roles. Kanchana and Rajasree reprised their roles. The following year, the film was remade in Hindi as Pyar Kiye Jaa. This remake was directed by Sridhar, and starred Shashi Kapoor and Kishore Kumar in the lead, while Mehmood Ali portrayed the role played by Nagesh in the original.[71] Rajasree, who again reprised her role, was the only actor to appear in both remakes.[8][16]

In August 2008, The Hindu reported that Manobala would be directing a remake of Kadhalikka Neramillai with R. Madhavan in the lead role.[72] Plans for a contemporary remake drew criticism. In an interview with Rekhs, a celebrity columnist for Behindwoods, Gopu said, "This film even if it is remade today, will not hold a candle to its original".[73] Crazy Mohan said, "Kadhalikka Naeramillai is Tamil Cinema’s Mount Everest of comedy. There’s no other Tenzing [Norgay] in sight so far. I was aghast that some people even considered re-making Kadhalikka Naeramillai. None should attempt it. It is blasphemy".[74] Sharadha Narayanan of The New Indian Express stated in February 2009, "Recently when the news of Kadhalikka Neramillai's remake was announced, every lip had one question that went unanswered: Who can actually do Nagesh’s role at least the way he did, if not better?"[75] An anonymous source close to the production team of Kavalai Vendam (2016) described it as a "modern day version" of Kadhalikka Neramillai to The Times of India.[76]

Legacy[edit]

 ...  [Kadhalikka Neramillai is] Tamil Cinema’s dictionary for humour ... And it has a solid message camouflaged in humour, that if you go in for ostentation and sycophancy you are bound to bite the dust ... No cheap rib-ticklers for Sridhar and Gopu! They could have made many a joke with the false beard Muthuraman sported in the film, but they didn’t. Classy comedy was their forte.

 —Crazy Mohan and his brother Maadhu Balaji in an interview with Malathi Rangarajan on how Kadhalikka Neramillai inspired them.[74]

Since its release, Kadhalikka Neramillai has developed a cult status in Tamil cinema.[6][77] It has been hailed as a trendsetting comedy,[41] and the film is said to kindle a feeling of joie de vivre.[41][74] The film's comedy sequences are regarded as evergreen.[78] The success of their on-screen pairing led Nagesh and Sachu to act together in films such as Motor Sundaram Pillai (1966), Galatta Kalyanam (1968), Sivandha Mann (1969) Sumathi En Sundari (1971) and Urimai Kural (1974).[23] According to The News Today, Kadhalikka Neramillai also popularised the romantic comedy genre.[79]

While the comedy track of 'Oho Productions' featuring Nagesh is considered to be one of Gopu's masterpieces,[4] the Balaiah-Nagesh scene is often termed to be legendary in Tamil cinema.[8] In a film that featured mostly newcomers, Balaiah was the most senior artiste. When the Balaiah-Nagesh pairing was an instant hit, he praised the latter saying, "Watch out! This boy is a scene-stealer".[80] Gopu said, "Chitralaya had a solid technical team ... Thangappan’s choreography in [Kadhalikka Neramillai] is timeless and combined with MSV’s magic, looks modern even today".[3]

After Tamil cinema's platinum jubilee in 2007,[b] when eight acclaimed directors were asked to list ten films they liked most, Kadhalikka Neramillai was chosen by K. S. Ravikumar.[81] In 2009, Y. G. Mahendra said the film "[...] taught me there is everything to know about comedy—what is timing, what is healthy comedy, what is situational comedy ... It also portrayed love in such a clean and healthy way. And, who can forget the music? I can relate to the songs even today. [...] Kaadhalikka ... is a movie for all seasons.[82] The Times of India named Kadhalikka Neramillai as one out of "the hundreds of funny Tamil films that will tickle your funny bone", stating, "There is no dearth for humour in this 1964 C V Sridhar film."[83]

Choreographer-turned-director Prabhu Deva, whose father Sundaram was the assistant choreographer under Thangappan, named Kadhalikka Neramillai among his five favourite films.[84] Crazy Mohan and comedian Aarthi also listed Kadhalikka Neramillai among their favourite films.[85][86] The film was featured in a list by The Hindu named "Bring on the laughs".[87] During the celebrations of the film's 50th anniversary, Kamal Haasan appreciated Gopu's dialogue in the film while Y. G. Mahendra said, "[Kadhalikka Neramillai] was Wodehouseian humour at its best—unadulterated and pure."[74] Director Vasanth noted in 2016, "when I watched Sridhar’s [Kadhalikka Neramillai] that guarantees three hours of non-stop laughter, I understood what filmmaking is all about. A director par excellence is someone who can handle all subjects and infuse all kinds of emotions in the audience."[88]

In popular culture[edit]

In 1985, choreographer Raghuram directed a film featuring Karthik and Jeevitha in the lead roles.[89] The film was titled Viswanathan Velai Venum after the song of the same name.[90] In 2006, Crazy Mohan wanted to create something similar to Kadhalikka Neramillai. He wrote the story, screenplay and dialogue of the film Jerry, which he described as his "pet project".[85][91] In 2011, director I. Ahmed's then-forthcoming film was initially titled Kadhalikka Neramillai, but this was changed to Endrendrum Punnagai (2013) because the producers could not get the rights to use the former name.[92][93]

Surya, son of writer Balakumaran, named his short film Kadhalikka Neramillai.[94] Independent filmmaker R. Buvana titled her romantic comedy film Kadhalikka Naeramundu ("There is Time for Love").[95] Y. G. Mahendra has a particular affinity for Kadhalikka Neramillai. When he launched his theatre group United Amateur Artists' 55th play, he named it Kadhalikka Neramundu as a tribute to Gopu and Sridhar.[96] The play, a parody of the film, was written by Gopu's son 'Chitralaya' Sriram.[97][98] Footage from Kadhalikka Neramillai is also shown in Kadhalum Kadandhu Pogum (2016).[99] The "horror film" scene picturised on Nagesh and Balaiah was re-used in Mo (2016).[100]

Explanatory notes[edit]

  1. ^ A Silver Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 25th anniversary.
  2. ^ A Platinum Jubilee is a celebration held to mark an anniversary; it usually refers to a 70th or 75th anniversary.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Rajadhyaksha & Willemen 1998, p. 380.
  2. ^ a b c Meera Srinivasan (21 October 2008). "Front Page: Veteran film director Sridhar dead". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 16 March 2014. Retrieved 16 March 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Malathi Rangarajan (10 July 2009). "Looking back with a smile". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 16 March 2014. Retrieved 16 March 2014. 
  4. ^ a b S. R. Ashok Kumar (20 November 2005). "'Chithralaya' Gopu, proprietor of Mannar & Co, Oho Productions". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 16 March 2014. Retrieved 16 March 2014. 
  5. ^ a b Anusha Parthasarathy (23 November 2010). "Memories of Madras: Heaven on earth". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 18 June 2015. Retrieved 16 March 2014. 
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External links[edit]