Kacha (sage)

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Shukracharya and Kacha

Kacha (Sanskrit: कच, Kaca) was an ancient sage and the son of Brihaspati in Hindu mythology. The narrative of Kacha is mentioned in the Mahābhārata, the Matsya Purana and the Agni Purana.[1] He was known for learning Mrita Sanjivini Mantra (a hymn for reviving the dead) and bringing many dead Devas back to life.

As a disciple to Shukracharya[edit]

Kacha was sent by his father Brihaspati to learn the secret of the Mrita Sanjivini mantra from Shukracharya, the guru of the Asuras. The idea was to help the Devas with the knowledge of this secret who were about to lose the war. Brihaspati also advises him to first impress Devayani in order to impress Shukracharya, who was very fond of his daughter. Kacha follows his advise and unknown to him Devayani falls in love with him.

In the meantime the Asuras want to kill Kacha, as he might be dangerous if he learns the Mantra. Every time they kill him, Shukracharya revives him with his art on the insistence of Devayani. The Asuras finally killed him and mixed his remains with alcohol and served it to Shukracharya. Shukracharya unknowingly consumed that, and when he tries to revive Kacha, he realises that Kacha was in his stomach. He teaches Kacha Mantra and tells him to come out. Kacha comes out by tearing his guru's stomach open and brings his life back with the help of Mantra.

Kacha starts his journey back to Deva loka when Devayani expresses her love for him and asks him to marry her. Kacha tells her that she is like a sister to him as she was the daughter of his guru, equivalent to father according to Hindu Dharma. This infuriates Devayani and she curses him that he would not be able to use Mrita Sanjivini Mantra. Kacha curses her that she wouldn't get a husband of strong character.

Kacha teaches the Mantra to his disciples who bring back all the dead suras to life. This bring suras upper hand in great battle between Suras and Asuras.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Pargiter, F.E. (1972). Ancient Indian Historical Tradition, Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, pp.196, 196ff.