Kaftoun

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Kaftoun
كفتون
City
Kaftoun 1996s.jpg
Map showing the location of Kaftoun within Lebanon
Map showing the location of Kaftoun within Lebanon
Kaftoun
Location within Lebanon
Coordinates: 34°16′N 35°46′E / 34.267°N 35.767°E / 34.267; 35.767Coordinates: 34°16′N 35°46′E / 34.267°N 35.767°E / 34.267; 35.767
Country  Lebanon
Governorate North Governorate
District Koura District
Time zone UTC+2 (EET)
 • Summer (DST) UTC+3 (EEST)
Dialing code +961
Website http://www.kaftoun.com/

Kaftoun (Arabic: كفتون‎) is a small Lebanese village located along the north bank of the Walnut River, in the Koura District, North Lebanon. The population of the village is approximately three-hundred, spread around seventy-four houses. They are mostly of Greek Orthodox ancestry.[1] The village is famous for the Moussa-Georges family.[2] The name "Kaftoun" in the ancient Aramaic language means "dug from" or "sculpted from" a cliff and also (Kftuna) could means "the domed". Both roots of the word lead us to believe that the village of Kaftoun was named after the domed Theotokos Monastery[3] which is carved in the red rock cliffs by the banks of the Jaouz River.

Kaftoun has three historic churches:[4] Saint Phocas Church (Mar Foka's[5]), the Church of Saint Sergius and Bacchus (Mar Sarkis[6]) 6th century, and the most famed Theotokos Monastery,[7] which houses a two-sided Byzantine icon[8] from the 11th century.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Municipal and ikhtiyariah elections in Northern Lebanon" (PDF). The Monthly. March 2010. p. 23. Archived from the original on 3 June 2016. Retrieved 1 November 2016. 
  2. ^ Kifraya website
  3. ^ Photo Gallery. Kaftoun. Retrieved on October 12, 2011.
  4. ^ Kaftoun Churchs. Kaftoun.com (6 November 2004). Retrieved on October 12, 2011.
  5. ^ Photo Gallery. Kaftoun. Retrieved on October 12, 2011.
  6. ^ Photo Gallery. Kaftoun. Retrieved on October 12, 2011.
  7. ^ The Kaftoun Theotokos Monastery - a jewel of spirituality!. Kaftoun.com (30 March 2005). Retrieved on October 12, 2011.
  8. ^ Kaftoun's Theotokos Archived 2006-04-24 at the Wayback Machine.. Ortmtlb.org.lb. Retrieved on October 12, 2011.

External links[edit]